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How do you differentiate x^2?

You bring the power down to multiply by the existing coefficient of x =1 in this case, and then you reduce the existing power by 1 leaving you with dy/dx= 2x. 

Oliver J. GCSE Maths tutor

2 years ago

Answered by Oliver, a GCSE Maths tutor with MyTutor


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