What is the difference between pro-natalist policies and anti-natalist policies?

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A natalist policy is a scheme or law that a government may adopt in order to control their population. 

This is usually carried out by incentives - money or material goods that are given to families if they have below or above a certain number of children.

An example of a pro-natalist policy, which encourages higher birthrates, is Singapore. Singapore pushed a campaign in 1988 offering 12 weeks maternity leave for mothers of 4+ children, posters and slogans - 'have 3 or more!', and offered larger and larger child benefits for each child a family had.

This was due to a fall in birthrate due to men and women deciding not to have families, and persue a careers instead.

An example of an anti-natalist policy, which encourages families to have fewer children, is the famous 'one-child policy' in China, introduced in 1978-1980. This was encouraged rather forcefully by the Chinese government, forcing women to have abortions if they already had a child. However there were financial benefits for families who kept to the one-child policy.

This was implemented to control the rapidly growing Chinese population.

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