How to factorise a simple linear equation such as '9Y + 6'

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Using the Example 9Y + 6

 

Factorising means to remove a common factor from both the ‘9Y’ term and the ‘6’ – this common factor will then be placed outside the brackets.

 

For us to complete this question, we must first find the largest number that can divide into both coefficients 9 and 6 – this of course being 3 because 9Y and 6 can be divided by 3 to give whole integer answers.

 

9Y / 3 = 3Y

6/3 = 2

 

So having found our largest common factor, and dividing our coefficients our factorisation becomes: 3(3Y + 2). The bracket represents our division sum answers and the 3 outside our common factor.

 

For practice have a try at these questions:

1)   6X + 12

2)   5Y + 15

3)   2X + 36

4)   4Y – 24 

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