Amy H.

Amy H.

£30 - £32 /hr

Medicine BMBS (Bachelors) - Exeter University

5.0
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.

64 reviews

Trusted by schools

This tutor is also part of our Schools Programme. They are trusted by teachers to deliver high-quality 1:1 tuition that complements the school curriculum.

269 completed lessons

About me

I am a 3rd year medical student at Exeter University. I love medicine, from the biochemical aspect all the way to the social aspect, and I am a naturally friendly, motivated figure. I tutor first years and A level/GCSE students in subject specific knowledge and med-school entry/admissions tests through my volunteering roles and as a university Student Ambassador. A reason I love my course is because it has offered me the opportunity to learn so much through discussion and debate and I believe together we can make an interesting and dynamic space for discussion and learning using this principle, and we can commit to a journey together to achieve your goals. I have many responsibilities within university life, including organising and participating in many volunteering activities, many of which relate to teaching. This makes me a well-trained and very eager individual, who can't wait to start working with you to encourage you to ace those exams. As a volunteering project, I co-founded a support group for those struggling with their mental health and have been trained by the national charity Student Minds to provide this, making me aware of the stress that exams can put on a person. Therefore, sessions that I provide will not only be informative and useful, but hopefully fun and inspiring, so we can work together to be the best that we can be. 

I am a 3rd year medical student at Exeter University. I love medicine, from the biochemical aspect all the way to the social aspect, and I am a naturally friendly, motivated figure. I tutor first years and A level/GCSE students in subject specific knowledge and med-school entry/admissions tests through my volunteering roles and as a university Student Ambassador. A reason I love my course is because it has offered me the opportunity to learn so much through discussion and debate and I believe together we can make an interesting and dynamic space for discussion and learning using this principle, and we can commit to a journey together to achieve your goals. I have many responsibilities within university life, including organising and participating in many volunteering activities, many of which relate to teaching. This makes me a well-trained and very eager individual, who can't wait to start working with you to encourage you to ace those exams. As a volunteering project, I co-founded a support group for those struggling with their mental health and have been trained by the national charity Student Minds to provide this, making me aware of the stress that exams can put on a person. Therefore, sessions that I provide will not only be informative and useful, but hopefully fun and inspiring, so we can work together to be the best that we can be. 

Show more

About my sessions

I think discussion is a key to learning. Within my medical school, we use a problem-based learning approach; we start with a problem case, and ask/answer questions about it to cover our curriculum. We can do this with your curriculum too, by taking concepts, expanding and dissecting them and helping you build your knowledge through communication. I believe that learning should be fun; as a flexible and engaged tutor I try my best to encourage this by using interesting, tactile mediums. These could include drawing, flashcard making, or even clay modelling. We can create something together and we can work not only towards achieving the best grades but learning how best you learn to prepare you for your next steps through life. Our session will start with a question. We can pose ideas that relate to it to activate our prior learning and then progress together by creating something, so you can learn as you build a useful revision resource. I also use “question boxes”, in which questions you have about the topic can be answered by us together as a plenary. This reminds us how the topics we study all link together, and even when we may feel lost in a subject, our current understanding can be a great foundation on which to build. To measure progress, we can look at practice questions together in a session and discuss your answers, where you would get marks and how we can improve, while also celebrating the progress we have made.

I think discussion is a key to learning. Within my medical school, we use a problem-based learning approach; we start with a problem case, and ask/answer questions about it to cover our curriculum. We can do this with your curriculum too, by taking concepts, expanding and dissecting them and helping you build your knowledge through communication. I believe that learning should be fun; as a flexible and engaged tutor I try my best to encourage this by using interesting, tactile mediums. These could include drawing, flashcard making, or even clay modelling. We can create something together and we can work not only towards achieving the best grades but learning how best you learn to prepare you for your next steps through life. Our session will start with a question. We can pose ideas that relate to it to activate our prior learning and then progress together by creating something, so you can learn as you build a useful revision resource. I also use “question boxes”, in which questions you have about the topic can be answered by us together as a plenary. This reminds us how the topics we study all link together, and even when we may feel lost in a subject, our current understanding can be a great foundation on which to build. To measure progress, we can look at practice questions together in a session and discuss your answers, where you would get marks and how we can improve, while also celebrating the progress we have made.

Show more

Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

DBS Icon

Enhanced DBS Check

20/08/2016

Ratings & Reviews

5
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
64 customer reviews
★ 5
★ 4
1
★ 3
0
★ 2
0
★ 1
0
JT
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.

Joy Student Lesson review 27 Dec '18, 14:30

27 Dec, 2018

very helpful

ZH
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.

Zara Student Lesson review 16 Dec '18, 15:00

16 Dec, 2018

very helpful thank you!

SZ
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.

Shahid Parent from Luton Lesson review 4 Nov '18, 17:00

4 Nov, 2018

my 1st session was very good

JT
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.
Star 1 Created with Sketch.

Jim Parent from London Lesson review 27 Sep '18, 19:00

27 Sep, 2018

Jim

Show more reviews

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
English LiteratureA-level (A2)A*
MathsA-level (A2)A
BiologyA-level (A2)A
ChemistryA-level (A2)A
Extended Project QualificationA-level (A2)A*
UKCATUni admission test3300

General Availability

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Pre 12pm
12 - 5pm
After 5pm

Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
BiologyA Level£30 /hr
BiologyGCSE£30 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£30 /hr
EnglishGCSE£30 /hr
English LiteratureGCSE£30 /hr
MathsGCSE£30 /hr
Medical School PreparationMentoring£30 /hr
Personal StatementsMentoring£30 /hr
BMAT (BioMedical Admissions)University£32 /hr
UCATUniversity£32 /hr

Questions Amy has answered

How does a signal move from one neurone to another and how does this process change for different motor responses?

The transmission of an action potential- the signal- from one neurone to another occurs over the synapse. The structure of a synapse is as follows; there is a presynaptic bulb, a post synaptic bulb and the synaptic cleft between them. The action potential moves along the neurone by depolarisation (sodium influx) and repolarisation (potassium outflux), and is followed by a hyperpolarised refractory period. When that action potential reaches the presynaptic bulb, voltage gated ion channels open as a result of the depolarisation. These allow for the movement of calcium ions into the cell, causing vesicles containing neurotransmitters- most commonly acetylcholine- to be exocytosed into the synaptic cleft. These neurotransmitters bind to receptors on the post synaptic bulb that cause depolarisation in the attached, post synaptic neurone via the influx of sodium. The remaining neurotransmitter in the cleft is broken down by enzymes. Differences in this process can be seen in the different neurotransmitters used. In the motor pathways- also known as efferent, and the ones that initiate a response to stimuli- the somatic pathway (voluntary movement) uses the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, as does the parasympathetic autonomic pathway (responsible for the "rest and digest" response; gut peristalsis, increased urinary output, decreased heart rate). The sympathetic autonomic pathway however uses noradrenaline (this is responsible for the "flight or fight" response; pupil dilation, increased heart and respiratory rate). The transmission of an action potential- the signal- from one neurone to another occurs over the synapse. The structure of a synapse is as follows; there is a presynaptic bulb, a post synaptic bulb and the synaptic cleft between them. The action potential moves along the neurone by depolarisation (sodium influx) and repolarisation (potassium outflux), and is followed by a hyperpolarised refractory period. When that action potential reaches the presynaptic bulb, voltage gated ion channels open as a result of the depolarisation. These allow for the movement of calcium ions into the cell, causing vesicles containing neurotransmitters- most commonly acetylcholine- to be exocytosed into the synaptic cleft. These neurotransmitters bind to receptors on the post synaptic bulb that cause depolarisation in the attached, post synaptic neurone via the influx of sodium. The remaining neurotransmitter in the cleft is broken down by enzymes. Differences in this process can be seen in the different neurotransmitters used. In the motor pathways- also known as efferent, and the ones that initiate a response to stimuli- the somatic pathway (voluntary movement) uses the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, as does the parasympathetic autonomic pathway (responsible for the "rest and digest" response; gut peristalsis, increased urinary output, decreased heart rate). The sympathetic autonomic pathway however uses noradrenaline (this is responsible for the "flight or fight" response; pupil dilation, increased heart and respiratory rate). 

Show more

11 months ago

114 views

Send Amy a message

A Free Video Meeting is a great next step. Just ask Amy below!


Send a message

How do we connect with a tutor?

Where are they based?

How much does tuition cost?

How do Online Lessons work?

mtw:mercury1:status:ok