Alice P. GCSE Psychology tutor, GCSE Biology tutor, IB Psychology tut...

Alice P.

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Psychology (Bachelors) - Durham University

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1 completed lesson

About me

Hi, my name is Alice and I am a Durham graduate with a 2.1 in Psychology.  My tutoring sessions aim to make learning enjoyable and motivating, helping you work through anything you don't understand and really bringing up exam confidence and getting you into the right exam mind-set so that you don't lose all the hard work you've put into revising!   I have achieved top grades in GCSE biology, history and psychology, and IB HL biology, history and psychology, achieving a total of 40 IB pointsI am also able to provide additional help in IB Extended Essay projects for psychology, as well as ToK orals & essays.

Hi, my name is Alice and I am a Durham graduate with a 2.1 in Psychology.  My tutoring sessions aim to make learning enjoyable and motivating, helping you work through anything you don't understand and really bringing up exam confidence and getting you into the right exam mind-set so that you don't lose all the hard work you've put into revising!   I have achieved top grades in GCSE biology, history and psychology, and IB HL biology, history and psychology, achieving a total of 40 IB pointsI am also able to provide additional help in IB Extended Essay projects for psychology, as well as ToK orals & essays.

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About my sessions

I believe that learning should be motivating for the student facilitated by tutor support to encourage curiosity and independent thinking. 

In the first session, I will establish an understanding of the student's current situation of study, their goals and their preferred style of tutoring. My sessions will involve breaking long-term academic goals into shorter and achievable ones. This will be achieved through discussion of what topics/material the student would like to focus on for a session or for future sessions, teaching of agreed topics/material, and homework activities/review of school courseword to measure progress. 

I believe that learning should be motivating for the student facilitated by tutor support to encourage curiosity and independent thinking. 

In the first session, I will establish an understanding of the student's current situation of study, their goals and their preferred style of tutoring. My sessions will involve breaking long-term academic goals into shorter and achievable ones. This will be achieved through discussion of what topics/material the student would like to focus on for a session or for future sessions, teaching of agreed topics/material, and homework activities/review of school courseword to measure progress. 

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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17/07/2017

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
English A Literature (Standard level)International Baccalaureate (IB) (SL)7
Maths Studies (Standard level)International Baccalaureate (IB) (SL)6
Chinese Language B (Standard level)International Baccalaureate (IB) (SL)6
Biology (Higher Level)International Baccalaureate (IB) (HL)6
Psychology (Higher Level)International Baccalaureate (IB) (HL)6
History (Higher level)International Baccalaureate (IB) (HL)6

General Availability

Pre 12pm12-5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
BiologyGCSE£18 /hr
PsychologyGCSE£18 /hr
BiologyIB£20 /hr
PsychologyIB£20 /hr

Questions Alice has answered

Describe the characteristics and biological causes of APD (Antisocial Personality Disorder).

Characteristics:

-       Lack of long-term/future planning. Makes poor decisions and is often impulsive

-       Getting aggressive and frequently getting into fights           

-       Breaking the law/ codes of civilised behaviour. Lying, stealing or conning

-       Failing to hold down a job for long, or not paying back money to people

-       Lack of empathy, not feeling guilty about hurting others

Causes:

·         Biological: Damaged amygdala (emotion- recognising and responding to stress and fear in others) or reduction in grey matter (specifically in the PFC)
Raine et al. (2000)
Aim: To test whether APD is caused  by problems with the prefrontal cortex (PFC), an area which helps control an individual’s social behaviour

Method: MRI scan of men with and without APD
Results: APD sufferers had 11% less prefrontal cortex  than  non-APD sufferers
Conclusion: Reduction  in brain grey matter could be responsible for causing APD.

Characteristics:

-       Lack of long-term/future planning. Makes poor decisions and is often impulsive

-       Getting aggressive and frequently getting into fights           

-       Breaking the law/ codes of civilised behaviour. Lying, stealing or conning

-       Failing to hold down a job for long, or not paying back money to people

-       Lack of empathy, not feeling guilty about hurting others

Causes:

·         Biological: Damaged amygdala (emotion- recognising and responding to stress and fear in others) or reduction in grey matter (specifically in the PFC)
Raine et al. (2000)
Aim: To test whether APD is caused  by problems with the prefrontal cortex (PFC), an area which helps control an individual’s social behaviour

Method: MRI scan of men with and without APD
Results: APD sufferers had 11% less prefrontal cortex  than  non-APD sufferers
Conclusion: Reduction  in brain grey matter could be responsible for causing APD.

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3 years ago

3033 views

What are some KEY evaluation points for psychological studies?

Generalisability & participant sample: Can the results be generalised and applied to larger settings or populations? Is the participant sample small (less than 20 participants) or large (better generalisability)? What sort of participants were used (gender/race/culture) and can the results be generalised to other populations?

Cultural and individual differences: Does the experiment take into consideration the cultural and individual differences of participants? It could be that experimenters ignore important aspects of an individual’s personality/religion/culture, which may have an impact on the results obtained.

Ethics: Deceit? (Was there any debrief?) Confidentiality (Right to anonymity- problem  in some very famous case studies) Physical or psychological harm? (Especially long-term impact on life post-experiment) Participant consent? Use of animals or children? (Questionable as animals and young children can’t express their emotions or objections)

Demand characteristics: Participants might not know how to behave and
therefore behave in a way they think the researcher wants them to.
This artificial behaviour might make results unreliable.

Ecological validity: Does the task given in the experiment to participants reflect what people actually do in real life?

Experimental setting-
             1) Laboratory: Artificial setting = artificial behaviours/ results
                 However, experimenter can control all variables, causality can be determined & it is replicable
              2) Field experiment: Real-life setting= natural behaviour -> less chance of demand characteristics. However,  experimenter has no control over variables (extraneous variables), therefore hard to replicate to get same results.
 

Generalisability & participant sample: Can the results be generalised and applied to larger settings or populations? Is the participant sample small (less than 20 participants) or large (better generalisability)? What sort of participants were used (gender/race/culture) and can the results be generalised to other populations?

Cultural and individual differences: Does the experiment take into consideration the cultural and individual differences of participants? It could be that experimenters ignore important aspects of an individual’s personality/religion/culture, which may have an impact on the results obtained.

Ethics: Deceit? (Was there any debrief?) Confidentiality (Right to anonymity- problem  in some very famous case studies) Physical or psychological harm? (Especially long-term impact on life post-experiment) Participant consent? Use of animals or children? (Questionable as animals and young children can’t express their emotions or objections)

Demand characteristics: Participants might not know how to behave and
therefore behave in a way they think the researcher wants them to.
This artificial behaviour might make results unreliable.

Ecological validity: Does the task given in the experiment to participants reflect what people actually do in real life?

Experimental setting-
             1) Laboratory: Artificial setting = artificial behaviours/ results
                 However, experimenter can control all variables, causality can be determined & it is replicable
              2) Field experiment: Real-life setting= natural behaviour -> less chance of demand characteristics. However,  experimenter has no control over variables (extraneous variables), therefore hard to replicate to get same results.
 

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3 years ago

8888 views

What are some methods of control in experiments?

Elimination: Removal of the extraneous variable (e.g. noise)

Constancy: Keeping the extraneous variable constant between two or more conditions (e.g. equal levels of noise)

Counter-balancing: Controlling variables that vary over time (e.g. practice or fatigue) by altering the conditions so that the variables have an equal effect on both conditions

Randomisation: Extraneous variables are varied unpredictably (e.g. random number generator)

Single-blind: Range of techniques used to prevent the demand characterstics influencing the results. Participant is not told which condition (control or experimental) they are placed in

Double-blind: Experimenter is kept in ignorance until after the data has been collected so that his/her bias’ and expectations don’t influence the results.

Elimination: Removal of the extraneous variable (e.g. noise)

Constancy: Keeping the extraneous variable constant between two or more conditions (e.g. equal levels of noise)

Counter-balancing: Controlling variables that vary over time (e.g. practice or fatigue) by altering the conditions so that the variables have an equal effect on both conditions

Randomisation: Extraneous variables are varied unpredictably (e.g. random number generator)

Single-blind: Range of techniques used to prevent the demand characterstics influencing the results. Participant is not told which condition (control or experimental) they are placed in

Double-blind: Experimenter is kept in ignorance until after the data has been collected so that his/her bias’ and expectations don’t influence the results.

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3 years ago

1018 views

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