Emily O.

Emily O.

£36 - £38 /hr

Medicine (Bachelors) - New College, Oxford University

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99 completed lessons

About me

I am a first year medical student at Oxford university. I chose to study medicine as, to me, it is the perfect combination of science and learning with human interaction and care. I love tutoring as it encompasses these same key principles which i am passionate about: helping others and teaching science. With a 16 year old brother currently preparing for his GCSEs, I have had experience tutoring and have found that i enjoy helping others learn. I also have experience mentoring from when I was in sixth form, where I volunteered and was trained to help younger students with subjects they found difficult in my spare time. 

I am available to tutor biology or chemistry for both GCSE and A-level students. I am also willing to help any students thinking of applying to study medicine, whether this be with interview tips and preparation or with admissions tests like the UKCAT and BMAT, both of which i have sat myself. 

I am a first year medical student at Oxford university. I chose to study medicine as, to me, it is the perfect combination of science and learning with human interaction and care. I love tutoring as it encompasses these same key principles which i am passionate about: helping others and teaching science. With a 16 year old brother currently preparing for his GCSEs, I have had experience tutoring and have found that i enjoy helping others learn. I also have experience mentoring from when I was in sixth form, where I volunteered and was trained to help younger students with subjects they found difficult in my spare time. 

I am available to tutor biology or chemistry for both GCSE and A-level students. I am also willing to help any students thinking of applying to study medicine, whether this be with interview tips and preparation or with admissions tests like the UKCAT and BMAT, both of which i have sat myself. 

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About my sessions

I think the key to successful tutoring is tailoring the sessions to the individual, ensuring I cover the topics the student finds most challenging and the key concepts that they find most difficult to remember. My aim is to improve a student's confidence in their particular subject so they feel prepared and ready for exams. I know how stressful revision can be, and can help students by giving advice and tips that I have picked up myself. My teaching sessions are interactive, getting the student involved instead of just feeding them information, and encouraging them to have a go at questions even if they are unsure, so we can then go through the topic together in a way that they can understand. I design my tutoring sessions always with the exams in mind, so correlates closely to their syllabus and students leave the session feeling confident that they can answer common exam questions in that relevant area. I think checking a students progress is very important throughout out tutoring sessions; I like to assess their confidence in the areas we have covered, so we can always go back to revist key concepts if necessary. I am passionate about my subjects and want to help students enjoy science too, providing them with tutoring to make difficult topics easier and ways to remember key information without feeling overwhelmed. I aim to help students reach their full potential so their hard work is reflected in their grades.

I think the key to successful tutoring is tailoring the sessions to the individual, ensuring I cover the topics the student finds most challenging and the key concepts that they find most difficult to remember. My aim is to improve a student's confidence in their particular subject so they feel prepared and ready for exams. I know how stressful revision can be, and can help students by giving advice and tips that I have picked up myself. My teaching sessions are interactive, getting the student involved instead of just feeding them information, and encouraging them to have a go at questions even if they are unsure, so we can then go through the topic together in a way that they can understand. I design my tutoring sessions always with the exams in mind, so correlates closely to their syllabus and students leave the session feeling confident that they can answer common exam questions in that relevant area. I think checking a students progress is very important throughout out tutoring sessions; I like to assess their confidence in the areas we have covered, so we can always go back to revist key concepts if necessary. I am passionate about my subjects and want to help students enjoy science too, providing them with tutoring to make difficult topics easier and ways to remember key information without feeling overwhelmed. I aim to help students reach their full potential so their hard work is reflected in their grades.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Enhanced DBS Check

26 Oct, 2017

Ratings & Reviews

5
25 reviews
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EA

Elise Parent from SOUTHWELL

14 Mar

Very Helpful

EA

Elise Parent from SOUTHWELL

10 Feb

Really helpful

AK

Anna Parent from Lancaster

14 Jan

Brilliant Oxbridge medicine preparation and mock interview that ended in an offer!

EA

Elise Parent from SOUTHWELL

24 Nov, 2018

very helpful in covering electrolysis and redox reactions

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
MathsA-level (A2)A*
BiologyA-level (A2)A*
ChemistryA-level (A2)A*
PsychologyA-level (AS)A

General Availability

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Pre 12pm
12 - 5pm
After 5pm

Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrice
BiologyA Level£38 /hr
ChemistryA Level£38 /hr
MathsA Level£38 /hr
BiologyGCSE£36 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£36 /hr
MathsGCSE£36 /hr
Medical School PreparationMentoring£38 /hr
Oxbridge PreparationMentoring£38 /hr
Personal StatementsMentoring£38 /hr
BMAT (BioMedical Admissions)University£38 /hr
UCATUniversity£38 /hr

Questions Emily has answered

Describe the structure of a DNA molecule and explain how this relates to its function.

DNA is made up of two nucleic acid strands joined by hydrogen bonding. Nucleic acids are polymers made up of many nucleotide monomers linked together by phosphodiester bonds. This type of bond is a covalent link between the phosphate at the 5' carbon of the pentose sugar of one nucleotide, and the hydroxyl group at the 3' postion of another nucleotide. This forms a very strong sugar-phosphate backbone which contributes to the stability of DNA. Each polynucleotide strand has a 5' end and a 3' end, and the two run antiparallel (in opposite directions) within DNA. As well as a pentose monosaccharide and negatively charged phosphate group, each nucleotide wihtin the chain has one of the four nitrogenous bases within its structure. These bases can be divided into the pyrimidines, cytosine and thymine and the purines, adenine and guanine. DNA winds into a double helix, with hydrogen bonding between the bases of each strand like the rungs of a ladder. This structure enables DNA to coil so that the long molecule is compact and lots of information can be stored in a small space. The bases within DNA undergo complimentary base pairing with cytosine forming three hydrogen bonds to guanine, and adenine forming two hydrogen bonds to thymine. Complimentary base pairing means that a larger purine always binds to a smaller pyramidine, keeping a constant distance between the two DNA backbones and resulting in parallel polynucleotide chains. The two strands are thus opposite and complimentary to each other, with sequence of the bases allowing DNA to carry coded information used for protein synthesis. Complimentary base pairing also functions to enable accurate DNA replication, as once the two strands are spearated, complimentary base pairing will reproduce an identical copy of the DNA moelcule. The bases are held together by hydrogen bonds, numerous enough to have a strong cumulative effect on the stability of the DNA molecule as a whole, but weak individually so that they can be broken and DNA can be 'unzipped' easily for replication. Finally, the DNA double helix has the strong sugar-phosphate backbone on the outside with the bases on the inside, making the molecule stable and protecting the vital coding bases from damage. DNA is made up of two nucleic acid strands joined by hydrogen bonding. Nucleic acids are polymers made up of many nucleotide monomers linked together by phosphodiester bonds. This type of bond is a covalent link between the phosphate at the 5' carbon of the pentose sugar of one nucleotide, and the hydroxyl group at the 3' postion of another nucleotide. This forms a very strong sugar-phosphate backbone which contributes to the stability of DNA. Each polynucleotide strand has a 5' end and a 3' end, and the two run antiparallel (in opposite directions) within DNA. As well as a pentose monosaccharide and negatively charged phosphate group, each nucleotide wihtin the chain has one of the four nitrogenous bases within its structure. These bases can be divided into the pyrimidines, cytosine and thymine and the purines, adenine and guanine. DNA winds into a double helix, with hydrogen bonding between the bases of each strand like the rungs of a ladder. This structure enables DNA to coil so that the long molecule is compact and lots of information can be stored in a small space. The bases within DNA undergo complimentary base pairing with cytosine forming three hydrogen bonds to guanine, and adenine forming two hydrogen bonds to thymine. Complimentary base pairing means that a larger purine always binds to a smaller pyramidine, keeping a constant distance between the two DNA backbones and resulting in parallel polynucleotide chains. The two strands are thus opposite and complimentary to each other, with sequence of the bases allowing DNA to carry coded information used for protein synthesis. Complimentary base pairing also functions to enable accurate DNA replication, as once the two strands are spearated, complimentary base pairing will reproduce an identical copy of the DNA moelcule. The bases are held together by hydrogen bonds, numerous enough to have a strong cumulative effect on the stability of the DNA molecule as a whole, but weak individually so that they can be broken and DNA can be 'unzipped' easily for replication. Finally, the DNA double helix has the strong sugar-phosphate backbone on the outside with the bases on the inside, making the molecule stable and protecting the vital coding bases from damage. 

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12 months ago

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