Abigail D. A Level Arabic tutor, A Level Spanish tutor, GCSE English ...

Abigail D.

Currently unavailable: until 02/05/2016

Degree: Modern Languages (Spanish and Arabic) (Bachelors) - Durham University

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About me

I am currently in my final year at Durham University studying Modern Languages (Spanish and Arabic). I am passionate about teaching languages in particular, but also in improving students' self confidence in a range of subjects.

I am happy to offer personalised help as a tutor for Spanish, Arabic, English Literature and Biology (the last two of which I studied at A level). Even if you are do not enjoy one of these subjects at first, you can achieve highly by getting the right help and investing your time effectively! It is really rewarding too!

I did a TEFL qualification in 2011 and have gained teaching experience with small classes of adults. I enjoy working with people and seeing progress together, as students meet their personal objectives and their academic targets.

I am happy to give advice sessions on revision techniques, academic goals, and applying for Universities as well, as I know that all of these things can be daunting when you've never done them before.

If you are interested in any of the subjects I offer, I look forward to hearing from you soon!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Arabic A Level £20 /hr
Spanish A Level £20 /hr
Biology GCSE £18 /hr
English Literature GCSE £18 /hr
Spanish GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
SpanishA-LevelA
English LiteratureA-LevelA*
BiologyA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

02/12/2014

Currently unavailable: until

02/05/2016

General Availability

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Please get in touch for more detailed availability

Questions Abigail has answered

How do I conjugate present tense verbs in Arabic?

Arabic verbs change according to pronouns a lot more than English verbs, but luckily they tend to follow regular patterns, so they are not too hard to learn. Here is a simple model to follow using the present, indicative of "to do" (the pronouns are in bold): أنا أفعل أنت تفعل / تفعلين هو ي...

Arabic verbs change according to pronouns a lot more than English verbs, but luckily they tend to follow regular patterns, so they are not too hard to learn. Here is a simple model to follow using the present, indicative of "to do" (the pronouns are in bold):

أنا أفعل

أنت تفعل / تفعلين

هو يفعل / هي تفعل

نحن نفعل

أنتما تفعلان

انتم تفعلون

ّانتنّ تفعلن

هما يفعلان

هم يفعلون

هنّ يفعلنّ

The best way to practise at the beginning is to repeat this model in writing and out loud several times, so that you begin to get used to the pattern. Then start applying it to other verbs, for example, "to speak":

أنا أتكلم

أنت تتكلم / تتكلمين

هو يتكلم / هي تتكلم

نحن نتكلم

أنتما تتكلمان

انتم تتكلمون

انتنّ تتكلمنّ

هما يتكلمان

هم يتكلمون

هنّ يتكلمنّ

Good luck!

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2 years ago

318 views

How do I use the subjunctive in Spanish?

The subjunctive is hard even for native speakers, so don't worry! There are a few handy rules to remember. Use the subjunctive in Spanish: 1. If the action you are describing did not actually happen: "Si hubiera estudiado, hubiera aprobado el examen." (If I had studied, I would have passed th...

The subjunctive is hard even for native speakers, so don't worry! There are a few handy rules to remember. Use the subjunctive in Spanish:

1. If the action you are describing did not actually happen: "Si hubiera estudiado, hubiera aprobado el examen." (If I had studied, I would have passed the exam.)

2. If you talk about actions performed by two different people in a sentence: "Quiero (yo) que hables (tú) sobre tu trabajo." (I want you to talk about your work.)

3. If you give a negative command, i.e. tell someone NOT to do something: "¡No hables conmigo de esa manera!" (Don't talk to me like that!)

4. If you are using certain set phrases expressing desire: "Ojalá venga Jaime a la fiesta." (I hope Jaime comes to the party.)

5. If you are talking about a future action: "Cuando esté en la universidad, seguiré estudiando el español." (When I am in university, I will continue studying Spanish.)

As you can see, the subjunctive is often used in situations where an action is hypothetical, and the above rules cover the majority of situations where we need to use this grammatical "mood". It seems daunting because we don't use the subjunctive in English, but it's not as hard as it seems at first! Try listening out to native speakers and hear when they use it too!

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2 years ago

296 views

How do I write a good essay for my English Literature GCSE?

Essay writing, for coursework but especially for exams, can seem stressful, but there are some simple steps to writing good essay answers every time. Here are some of my top tips: 1. Always start with a plan! Even if you are in an exam, look at your question, make sure you understand it well ...

Essay writing, for coursework but especially for exams, can seem stressful, but there are some simple steps to writing good essay answers every time.

Here are some of my top tips:

1. Always start with a plan! Even if you are in an exam, look at your question, make sure you understand it well and then make a few bullet points about the important things you need to say. This way, you won't run out of ideas half way through or forget any of your great ideas in the rush of the essay.

2. Remember to write an introduction. Give a bit of background that you know (e.g. who wrote the book/poem you are writing about, when/where they wrote it, and who the main characters are). Then state your purpose for the essay (e.g. This essay will show that the theme of death and loss is central to this piece of poetry.)

3. Divide your points up into clear paragraphs. Organise your ideas so that whoever marks your work can see that you have lots of different points to make.

4. End with a conclusion. Always try to summarise your main points and make sure you fully answer the question you have been set in the conclusion. This will show your teachers that you have really understood what they asked and that you deserve the top marks!

Every essay is different, but if you understand the question and follow a good structure like this one, you are sure to do well!

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2 years ago

344 views
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