PremiumHan Jim Z. A Level Further Mathematics  tutor, A Level Maths tutor, G...

Han Jim Z.

Currently unavailable: for new students

Degree: Maths, Operational Research, Statistics and Economics (Bachelors) - Warwick University

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About me

I started tutoring in the summer before my degree and have since taught in a variety of settings such as peer teaching classes at University and briefly teaching English to 12+ students in China. I also volunteered abroad In Kenya as part of a UK government scheme to teach entrepreneurship skills to local youth. Most recently I have been teaching GCSE and A-Level online and offline after developing a rigorous program for each individual pupil.

I gained Upper Second Class Honours in Maths, Operational Research, Statistics and Economics at Warwick University and took 4 A*/A grades at A level (including Further Maths which I learnt myself during a Gap Year) and ten A*/As at GCSE (including IGCSE Maths taken 1 year early). 

What's unique is that I am also experienced in the private sector having undertaken multiple internships at investment banks in between studying at Warwick University and shortly after graduation in early 2014. So for A Level students already with ambitions of breaking into the City I am able to assist by offering careers guidance as well as CV and Cover Letter advice, having also been the sole Careers and Skills representative for my department at University. With the graduate market becoming ever more saturated, I can offer insight and demonstrated expertise in landing multiple job offers even before graduation! 

These are some of my educational principles: 

- I will keep all stakeholders in the loop; that means showing parents how their child is progressing. I reply to emails as quickly as possible. 
- I think of the whole learning experience as an entire revision period whilst spending time on creating a solid foundation first. 
- I also believe each person has innate strengths and thus will tailor the learning experience to promote faster growth and development. 

Thank you. Jim

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Economics A Level £24 /hr
Further Mathematics A Level £24 /hr
Maths A Level £24 /hr
Economics GCSE £22 /hr
Maths GCSE £22 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
Maths, Operational Research, Statistics and Economics Bachelors DegreeBsc 2:1
Further MathsA-LevelA*
MathsA-LevelA
EconomicsA-LevelA
BiologyA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

25/11/2014

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for new students

Ratings and reviews

0from 1 customer review

Max (Parent) January 5 2016

Very approachable. Good structure to problem solving.

Questions Han Jim has answered

Explain briefly the Normal Distribution

Firstly, understanding how to construct a histogram will make understanding the Normal Distribution aka Gaussian Distribution much easier. It is still an arrangement of a data set in which most values cluster in the middle of the range and the rest taper off symmetrically toward either extre...

Firstly, understanding how to construct a histogram will make understanding the Normal Distribution aka Gaussian Distribution much easier.

It is still an arrangement of a data set in which most values cluster in the middle of the range and the rest taper off symmetrically toward either extreme. The result is a bell-shaped curve which we can describe using two factors: mean and standard deviation. Just like a histogram, the more area there is, the more data points there are. However, the Normal Distribution gives us a probability instead.

The precise shape can vary according to the distribution of the population but the peak is always in the middle and the curve is always symmetrical. In a normal distribution, the mean, mode and median are all the same.

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1 year ago

341 views

What is the Phillips Curve?

The Phillips curve shows the inverse relationship between unemployment and inflation named after British economist AW Phillips. Once inflation and unemployment rates were plotted on a scatter diagram, the data appeared to demonstrate an inverse and stable relationship between inflation and un...

The Phillips curve shows the inverse relationship between unemployment and inflation named after British economist AW Phillips.

Once inflation and unemployment rates were plotted on a scatter diagram, the data appeared to demonstrate an inverse and stable relationship between inflation and unemployment.

 

The curve suggested that changes in the level of unemployment have a direct and predictable effect on the level of price inflation. The accepted explanation during the 1960’s was that a fiscal stimulus, and increase in AD, would trigger the following sequence of responses:

  1. An increase in the demand for labour as government spending generates growth.

  2. The pool of unemployed will fall.

  3. Firms must compete for fewer workers by raising nominal wages.

  4. Workers have greater bargaining power to seek out increases in nominal wages.

  5. Wage costs will rise.

  6. Faced with rising wage costs, firms pass on these cost increases in higher prices.

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2 years ago

343 views
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