Laura M. GCSE Maths tutor

Laura M.

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Degree: Mathematics with Study in Continental Europe (Masters) - Bristol University

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About me

Hi, I'm Laura and I'm a first year Mathematics student at the University of Bristol.

During my A Levels, I tutored Year 11 pupils for their GCSE Mathematics exam and would love to do the same for you. 

In order to help you achieve the best grade you possibly can, I will focus the sessions on what you are struggling with and use your feedback to structure future sessions. 

If you are interested or have any questions, send me a 'WebMail' or book a 'Meet the Tutor Session' with me. 

I look forward to hearing from you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Maths GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
Mathematics A-LevelA
Further MathematicsA-LevelA
GeographyA-LevelB
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

23/10/2014

Currently unavailable: no new students

Questions Laura has answered

How do I find the nth term of a sequence?

For any sequence where there is a common difference (it increases or decreases with the same amount, n, each time) you can find the nth term using the formula:dn+(a-d) "a" is the value of the first term in the sequence "d" is the common difference between the terms To find the nth term you f...

For any sequence where there is a common difference (it increases or decreases with the same amount, n, each time) you can find the nth term using the formula: dn+(a-d)

"a" is the value of the first term in the sequence

"d" is the common difference between the terms

To find the nth term you find the values of "a" and "d" and stick them in the formula, dn+(a-d)

For example: Find the nth term of this sequence: 3,7,11,15

The first term is 3, so a=3

The common difference is 4 (as it increases by 4 each time), so d=4

By using the formula we get, 4n+(3-4), which is equal to 4n-1

We can check this works by subbing in values of n into the formula and you will see that it is correct. 

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2 years ago

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