Christie M. GCSE Biology tutor, GCSE Chemistry tutor, A Level -Medica...

Christie M.

£22 - £26 /hr

Medicine and surgery (Bachelors) - Newcastle University

4.8
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19 reviews

Trusted by schools

51 completed lessons

Message Christie

About me

- I am a fourth year medical student at Newcastle University. 

- I am a fourth year medical student at Newcastle University. 

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About my sessions

- Learning outcomes stated at the beginning of the tutorial 

- Lesson plan based around what the STUDENT  finds difficult 

- A range of learning methods: diagrams, quizzes, recall, pictures

- Feedback and set tasks at the end of the session to go through the following week

- Learning outcomes stated at the beginning of the tutorial 

- Lesson plan based around what the STUDENT  finds difficult 

- A range of learning methods: diagrams, quizzes, recall, pictures

- Feedback and set tasks at the end of the session to go through the following week

Show more

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Enhanced DBS Check

26/10/2017

Ratings & Reviews

4.8from 19 customer reviews
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Elena (Parent from London)

Very helpful!

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Serena (Student)

Christie was able to explain a concept to me that i had been struggling with all year within 1 hour and made it so easy for me to understand. Going through a past paper question with her helped my put my learning into action. Such a great lesson with a great tutor.

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Zaira (Student)

April 4 2018

Helps me to understand everything really clearly before moving on and also focuses on exam technique. Overall really good tutor!

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Abraham (Parent from Chester)

Christie makes sure we have gone through the basics before doing past paper questions, she has good teaching techniques and knowledge of the subject

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
MathematicsA-level (A2)A
English literature A-level (A2)A
Biology A-level (A2)A*
Chemistry A-level (A2)A*
UkcatUni admission test765

General Availability

Pre 12pm12-5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
BiologyA Level£24 /hr
ChemistryA Level£24 /hr
BiologyGCSE£22 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£22 /hr
English LiteratureGCSE£22 /hr
MathsGCSE£22 /hr
-Personal Statements-Mentoring£24 /hr
.UKCAT.Uni Admissions Test£26 /hr

Questions Christie has answered

How are blood glucose levels regulated in humans?

Blood glucose homeostasis involves maintaining the levels of blood glucose within a very narrow limit around a set point (90mg 100cm-3). This is done via hormonal regulation. On one hand, insulin which is a peptide hormone, is produced by the beta cells of the pancreas (islets of Langerhans). It is released by the pancreatic beta cells when blood glucose levels rise, such as after ingesting a carbohydrate-rich meal. Insulin binds onto cellular receptors. It causes glycogenesis (conversion of glucose to glycogen) in lover and skeletal muscle, the conversion of glucose into fat (triglycerols) within adipose tissue as well as increasing cellular uptake of glucose. These processes reduce blood glucose levels back to set point. 

However, glucagon, a hormone produced by the alpha cells of the pancreas increases blood glucose back to set point when blood glucose levels have dropped such as when a person is exercising. It increases the rate of glycogen breakdown (glycogenolysis), the release of fatty acids from adipose tissue to be used to make glucose (gluconeogenesis) and also increasing the rate of fat break down (lipolysis). This is to provide cellular glucose to be broken down during respiration to produce ATP molecules. 

There are other hormones also released to increase blood glucose such as adrenalin, the ''fight or flight'' hormone produced by the adrenal medulla. It increases glycogenolysis, and fatty acid release. Cortisol, another hormone, produced in the adrenal cortex, causes amino acids (small building blocks of protein) to be released from skeletal muscle and fatty acids to be released from adipose. Amino acids and fatty acids are converted to glucose via gluconeogenesis. 

 

 

 

Blood glucose homeostasis involves maintaining the levels of blood glucose within a very narrow limit around a set point (90mg 100cm-3). This is done via hormonal regulation. On one hand, insulin which is a peptide hormone, is produced by the beta cells of the pancreas (islets of Langerhans). It is released by the pancreatic beta cells when blood glucose levels rise, such as after ingesting a carbohydrate-rich meal. Insulin binds onto cellular receptors. It causes glycogenesis (conversion of glucose to glycogen) in lover and skeletal muscle, the conversion of glucose into fat (triglycerols) within adipose tissue as well as increasing cellular uptake of glucose. These processes reduce blood glucose levels back to set point. 

However, glucagon, a hormone produced by the alpha cells of the pancreas increases blood glucose back to set point when blood glucose levels have dropped such as when a person is exercising. It increases the rate of glycogen breakdown (glycogenolysis), the release of fatty acids from adipose tissue to be used to make glucose (gluconeogenesis) and also increasing the rate of fat break down (lipolysis). This is to provide cellular glucose to be broken down during respiration to produce ATP molecules. 

There are other hormones also released to increase blood glucose such as adrenalin, the ''fight or flight'' hormone produced by the adrenal medulla. It increases glycogenolysis, and fatty acid release. Cortisol, another hormone, produced in the adrenal cortex, causes amino acids (small building blocks of protein) to be released from skeletal muscle and fatty acids to be released from adipose. Amino acids and fatty acids are converted to glucose via gluconeogenesis. 

 

 

 

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3 years ago

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