Penny P. GCSE German tutor, A Level French tutor, A Level German tuto...

Penny P.

£20 - £22 /hr

Currently unavailable: for new students

Studying: Modern Languages (Bachelors) - Exeter University

5.0
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21 reviews| 35 completed tutorials

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About me

Hi Everyone! I'm Penny and I tutor French and German GCSE and A-Level. I'm currently in my 4th year at Exeter university, fresh from my year abroad where I was teaching English at a secondard school in Cologne.  I am working to finish my BA in French, German and TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages). Having sat through these exams myself, I'm up to date with the latest specifications of GCSEs and A-Levels in both AQA and Edexcel exam boards, and know what the examiners are looking for. I have 10 years of experience learning languages and 2 years of practical teaching experience through my TESOL studies, and 9 months teaching experience in a school. I'm a positive, friendly and patient tutor focused on getting you or your child the best grades. I have been lucky enough to have had the opportunity to spend a significant amount of time in France and Germany, travelling, working and volunteering. This means I can guarantee you a high level understanding of French and German, going above and beyond what you learn in school. My sessions can be fully customised to your needs. I aim to focus on all aspects of the language; whether it be Reading, Writing, Listening or Oral, I’ll help you every step of the way towards the exam! Our sessions will always be fun and relaxed and not boring or stressful! My timetable is very flexible, so don't be afraid to request a certain time.  If you are interested, please click on the ‘Meet the Tutor’ button for a free chat to get to know me and my tutoring skills a little better!Hi Everyone! I'm Penny and I tutor French and German GCSE and A-Level. I'm currently in my 4th year at Exeter university, fresh from my year abroad where I was teaching English at a secondard school in Cologne.  I am working to finish my BA in French, German and TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages). Having sat through these exams myself, I'm up to date with the latest specifications of GCSEs and A-Levels in both AQA and Edexcel exam boards, and know what the examiners are looking for. I have 10 years of experience learning languages and 2 years of practical teaching experience through my TESOL studies, and 9 months teaching experience in a school. I'm a positive, friendly and patient tutor focused on getting you or your child the best grades. I have been lucky enough to have had the opportunity to spend a significant amount of time in France and Germany, travelling, working and volunteering. This means I can guarantee you a high level understanding of French and German, going above and beyond what you learn in school. My sessions can be fully customised to your needs. I aim to focus on all aspects of the language; whether it be Reading, Writing, Listening or Oral, I’ll help you every step of the way towards the exam! Our sessions will always be fun and relaxed and not boring or stressful! My timetable is very flexible, so don't be afraid to request a certain time.  If you are interested, please click on the ‘Meet the Tutor’ button for a free chat to get to know me and my tutoring skills a little better!

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18/03/2017

Ratings & Reviews

5from 21 customer reviews
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Kirsty (Parent)

May 15 2017

great help before exams

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Kirsty (Parent)

February 22 2017

Helped me a lot with remembering basic grammar that i was originally struggling with in the German language.

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Luke (Student)

January 17 2017

Very good!

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Jenny (Parent)

March 31 2016

Very useful session

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
FrenchA-level (A2)A
GermanA-level (A2)A
Graphic DesignA-level (A2)A
French and German with TESOLDegree (Bachelors)1

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
FrenchA Level£22 /hr
GermanA Level£22 /hr
FrenchGCSE£20 /hr
GermanGCSE£20 /hr

Questions Penny has answered

How do I form the passive voice?

Contrary to popular belief, the passive is a 'voice' not a tense, but it can be used in different tenses - the present, past or future for example. 

Confusing huh? So when should you use the passive voice? 

It is used much less than the passive voice in English, nonetheless it is used. The passive is used when the subject doing the verb is irrelevant, and the focus is placed on the object of the verb - for example:

Active: Ich singe das Lied 
            I am singing the song

Passive: Das Lied wird von mir gesungen
               The song is being sung by me

So how do you form the passive voice? 

1.       To form the passive, German uses werden (to become) + the past participle, while English uses "to be."

2.       The word "song" (das Lied) in the ACTIVE sentence is an object being acted upon ( In the PASSIVE sentence the former object (Lied) becomes the subject, while the former subject (I, ich) is now the agent (by me/von mir).

3.       Only transitive verbs (those that take a direct object) can be made passive. The direct object (accusative case) in the active voice becomes the subject (nominative case) in the passive voice.

A passive voice sentence may or may not include the "agent" (by whom something was done). If the agent (by me, by John) is a person, it is expressed in German with avon-phrase: von John (by John). If the agent is not a person, then a durch-phrase is used:durch den Wind (by the wind)

 

 

Here are some examples of the passive voice being used in different tenses:

 

Perfect: Das Lied wurde gesungen

             The song was sung

(Subject + imperfect of werden + past participle)

 

Pluperfect: Das Lied ist gesungen worden
                  The song has been sung

(Subject + perfect tense of werden + past participle)

 

Present: Das Lied wird gesungen

                The song is being sung

(Subject + present tense werden + past participle)

 

Future: Das Lied wird gesungen werden
             The song will be sung

(Subject + future tense of werden + past participle) 

Contrary to popular belief, the passive is a 'voice' not a tense, but it can be used in different tenses - the present, past or future for example. 

Confusing huh? So when should you use the passive voice? 

It is used much less than the passive voice in English, nonetheless it is used. The passive is used when the subject doing the verb is irrelevant, and the focus is placed on the object of the verb - for example:

Active: Ich singe das Lied 
            I am singing the song

Passive: Das Lied wird von mir gesungen
               The song is being sung by me

So how do you form the passive voice? 

1.       To form the passive, German uses werden (to become) + the past participle, while English uses "to be."

2.       The word "song" (das Lied) in the ACTIVE sentence is an object being acted upon ( In the PASSIVE sentence the former object (Lied) becomes the subject, while the former subject (I, ich) is now the agent (by me/von mir).

3.       Only transitive verbs (those that take a direct object) can be made passive. The direct object (accusative case) in the active voice becomes the subject (nominative case) in the passive voice.

A passive voice sentence may or may not include the "agent" (by whom something was done). If the agent (by me, by John) is a person, it is expressed in German with avon-phrase: von John (by John). If the agent is not a person, then a durch-phrase is used:durch den Wind (by the wind)

 

 

Here are some examples of the passive voice being used in different tenses:

 

Perfect: Das Lied wurde gesungen

             The song was sung

(Subject + imperfect of werden + past participle)

 

Pluperfect: Das Lied ist gesungen worden
                  The song has been sung

(Subject + perfect tense of werden + past participle)

 

Present: Das Lied wird gesungen

                The song is being sung

(Subject + present tense werden + past participle)

 

Future: Das Lied wird gesungen werden
             The song will be sung

(Subject + future tense of werden + past participle) 

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