Aiden M. GCSE Classical Greek tutor, A Level Classical Greek tutor, G...

Aiden M.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Classics (Bachelors) - Cambridge University

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About me

As terms are very short at Cambridge and long holidays mean that I get rusty, learning Greek and Latin thoroughly will benefit both you and me. Languages are designed to be easily learnt and if they are 'dead', I feel there is a greater duty for them to be taught.

 

I am a patient but active teacher. In classes we are often asked to teach linguistic ideas to our peers through a thorough and comprehensive analysis. I am captain of the college football team and lead the training sessions for new players.

 

What will the lessons be like?

 

I'm a bit of a geek when it comes to ancient history and I have a deep interest, which I'd love to convey, in Greek and Roman civilization. An understanding of classical culture will accompany explanations of grammar and revision of vocabulary in my lessons.

 

With grammar, we will try to break down the threads and the rules which make the language easy to understand. Through the understanding of idioms and syntax, translations will become more fluid.

 

With vocabulary, I like to test myself but I want to find out what's best for you and work around your strengths. I find it interesting to break down words; where it comes from and how it might be found in other languages that we know, especially English.

 

Ultimately, the sessions will be interactive and catered to your strengths. I cannot emphasise how welcome your questions are – I shall follow them up for the following sessions if I am bamboozled and my knowledge will grow too.

 

I am also willing to offer advice on applications. I understand how stressful they can be and it is important to get feedback.

 

Get in touch and I'll be more than happy to help!

 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Classical Greek A Level £20 /hr
Latin A Level £20 /hr
Classical Greek GCSE £18 /hr
Latin GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Physics GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
LatinA-LevelA
Further MathsA-LevelA*
MathsA-LevelA*
PhysicsA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Questions Aiden has answered

How is the genitive used in Ancient Greek?

 In broad terms the genitive ‘limits the meaning of substantives, adjectives, and adverbs, less commonly that of verbs’ (Smyth §1289); historically speaking it has absorbed some functions of the lost ablative case and so often denotes separation, where we then find the ideas of comparison, cau...

 In broad terms the genitive ‘limits the meaning of substantives, adjectives, and adverbs, less commonly that of verbs’ (Smyth §1289); historically speaking it has absorbed some functions of the lost ablative case and so often denotes separation, where we then find the ideas of comparison, cause, and source. This is also where we find ‘absolute’ syntax in the genitive absolute since such clauses are felt to be ‘free from’ (< ab + solvo) the main syntax of the sentence (see Smyth §2075 on the origin of the construction). But the genitive can also denote part, quality, material, measure, value, ‘time within which’, etc., all relationships that English might normally express with ‘of’ (which is connected to ἀπό and ab).

 

Theser are the types of genitives that are found in Greek:

 

 The genitive of separation is normally found with a preposition (e.g. ἀπό or ἐκ) or prepositional prefix in Classical Greek, but it can be found with other words that imply separation,

 The genitive of comparison can be used in lieu of a comparative clause introduced by the conjunction ἤ than. Note that if the conjunction ἤ is used then the two words being compared will be in the same case. Naturally comparative forms very frequently introduce a genitive of comparison,

 

 Some simple partitive genitives (note that superlatives are common with this genitive) i.e. the best of the men or one of the children.

 

The genitive of time (within which) denotes a space of time within which some action takes place, e.g. νυκτὸς μέσης ἦλθον: I came in the middle of the night

 

The possessive genitive is self-explanatory

 

With the terms subjective genitive and objective genitive we distinguish between a genitive as the active agent (= ‘subject’) and the recipient (= ‘object’) of the action implied. Where ambiguity arises there is room to recognise such as a stylistic feature.

 

In keeping with many of these uses the genitive follows many adjectives (e.g. αἴτιος, ἄξιος, μεστός and πλήρης) and verbs

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1 year ago

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