PremiumKrithi R. Mentoring -Medical School Preparation- tutor, Uni Admission...

Krithi R.

Currently unavailable: until 29/05/2016

Degree: Medicine (Bachelors) - Oxford, St Anne's College University

Contact Krithi
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Krithi

About me

About me!

I'm a medical student at Oxford University, and passionate about people and Science. I find the tutoring process very enriching personally, and would love to help you achieve your full potential during exams and university applications!

The sessions

I've developed tried-and-testing methods through informal teaching at school - helping younger students with Science and Maths and mentoring them through the university application process. 

During the sessions, I'll springboard from what you already know onto topics that you find more challenging. I'll make sure you have a core understanding by getting you to engage with the material in a variety of ways (e.g. thought exercises, analogies, pictorial representations). Once we have that sorted, we can move onto application of concepts, which is crucial in Science and Maths! We'll then establish your understanding by doing some past-paper questions, when I can offer advice tailored to your specification and board. 

University applications

There are a lot of misconceptions surrounding university applications, and I'll try my best to make the process as straightforward for you as possible, so that we can concentrate on what really matters - what you want to do at university, and whyWe'll focus on developing and emphasising your strengths and think about what you could do to make yourself a stellar candidate.

 

As a medic who has been there and done that, I can offer tips for university admissions tests such as the UKCAT and BMAT. We can also go through the interview process (including Oxbridge interviews) so that you feel more comfortable when it's your turn :)

I have a lot of experience volunteering abroad and doing extra-curricular activities in the UK, so I'd be able to help you out if you were looking for gap year options

Next steps

You can get in touch by booking a free "Meet the tutor" session through this website - do let me know what level (GCSE or A-Level) and which exam board you're doing, and which topics you find difficult.

I look forward to meeting you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Biology A Level £24 /hr
Chemistry A Level £24 /hr
Biology GCSE £22 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £22 /hr
Maths GCSE £22 /hr
-Medical School Preparation- Mentoring £24 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £24 /hr
.BMAT (BioMedical Admissions) Uni Admissions Test £26 /hr
.UKCAT. Uni Admissions Test £26 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
BiologyA-LevelA*
ChemistryA-LevelA*
MathematicsA-LevelA*
FrenchA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: until

29/05/2016

Ratings and reviews

5from 6 customer reviews

B (Parent) January 24 2016

The mentoring session was brilliant. You gave amazing and extremely useful advice, I never thought anyone could talk so elegantly and knowledgeably. My daughter and I fully understood everything she said as it was very clear. Thank you to my tutor web for having teachers that have extremely high quality teaching methods.

B (Parent) January 17 2016

Top tutor.

Amina (Student) June 29 2015

Krithi is very patient and her lessons are allways fun :)

Amina (Student) June 16 2015

very helpful, it was also a last-minute session, so it was so kind of her to agree to it with me :)
See all reviews

Questions Krithi has answered

What extracurriculars should i do to get into medical school?

Contrary to what it may seem like, there is no "golden" set of extracurriculars that will get you into medical school. The most important things are: 1. To ensure that you have some long-standing activities which you have been doing a while to demonstrate your interest and commitment to a cau...

Contrary to what it may seem like, there is no "golden" set of extracurriculars that will get you into medical school. The most important things are:

1. To ensure that you have some long-standing activities which you have been doing a while to demonstrate your interest and commitment to a cause

2. To actually think about what doing that particular activity offers you. It's so easy to blindly start doing things, but at medical school interviews and in personal statements, it is crucial to emphasise how your extracurricular activities have contributed to and strengthened your desire to become a doctor.

3. To try and go the extra mile with extracurriculars - for example, if you're working in a charity shop, you could offer to help make the layout of the shop more attractive to customers, help to devise a system to organise donated items etc. This extra effort will show that you have problem-solving skills and plenty of enthusiasm!

Some examples of extracurricular activities include:

1. VOLUNTEERING: at the local hospice, a nursing home, a charity shop, volunteering to run facilities at the local hospital (such as the mobile library)

2. LEADING: leading summer camps for children/young people, organising fundraisers

3. OTHER: writing/editing for student newspapers/journals, music, sport, drama, photography, public speaking/debating

The above are just examples, but as long as you care about what you do, it counts. Don't underestimate the importance of non-medical activities - the communication, team-work and problem-solving skills which you observe during clinical work experience can actually be put into practice as a volunteer, fundraiser or student journalist. 

Best of luck!

see more

2 years ago

390 views

What is the difference between competitive and non-competitive enzyme inhibition?

The active site of an enzyme is the place on the enzyme molecule where the substrate (the substance which participates in the reaction catalysed by the enzyme) normally binds.  Competitive inhibitors slow down enzyme action by acting at the active site - they bind to the active site of the en...

The active site of an enzyme is the place on the enzyme molecule where the substrate (the substance which participates in the reaction catalysed by the enzyme) normally binds. 

Competitive inhibitors slow down enzyme action by acting at the active site - they bind to the active site of the enzyme molecule to prevent the substrate binding, so that that the reaction cannot be catalysed by the enzyme. The name "competitive" comes from the idea that the inhibitor "competes" to bind to the active site with the substrate. You can overcome the effect of a competitive inhibitor by simply adding more substrate so that the "competition" tips in favour of the substrate instead of the inhibitor.

Non-competitive inhibitors act at a site other than the active site on the enzyme molecule, so they don't actually "compete" with the substrate to bind to the active site. They act by changing the shape of an enzyme molecule once they bind to it, which also changes the shape of the active site. So, the substrate cannot bind to the active site anymore. You cannot overcome the effect of a non-competitive inhibitor by adding more substrate - the shape of the enzyme is changed permanently and the substrate will not bind to the active site no matter how much is present.

see more

2 years ago

722 views
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Krithi

Still comparing tutors?

How do we connect with a tutor?

Where are they based?

How much does tuition cost?

How do tutorials work?

Cookies:

We use cookies to improve our service. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok