PremiumJames B. Uni Admissions Test -Medical School Preparation- tutor, Ment...

James B.

Currently unavailable: until 14/11/2016

Degree: Medicine (Bachelors) - Warwick University

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About me

Hi there! My name is James, I’m a second year medical student studying at the University of Warwick.

I have also studied biomedical sciences and have a PhD in Biomaterials from the University of Brighton. I’m an experienced student who understands how hard it can be to digest and memorise complex subjects.

I’ve very recently passed one of the hardest exams I've experienced so far at medical school, I would be happy to share advice on how to learn effectively as well as tutoring you on many subject areas within the sciences at GCSE, A-Level and above.

Any budding medical students looking to apply to medical school, I can help you obtain; UKCAT score, experience and a killer personal statement needed to stride ahead of the competition.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Biology A Level £20 /hr
Human Biology A Level £20 /hr
Biology GCSE £18 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £18 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr
.UKCAT. Uni Admissions Test £25 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
Intracellular biology and biomaterialsDoctoratePass
BiomedicineBachelors Degree1st
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

01/05/2014

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: until

14/11/2016

Ratings and reviews

5from 3 customer reviews

Habib (Student) May 19 2016

Have had a few tutorials but I must say James is up there with the very best of tutors. He is extremely knowledgeable as well as interactive and goes that extra mile for you. He has helped me improve significantly and provided me the opportunity to learn new things which I have no doubt will benefit me. I can not thank him enough. I 100% recommend him to any student.

Mantaaqa (Student) September 17 2016

Lena (Parent) July 4 2016

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Questions James has answered

How do i get relevant experience?

Experience is vital for an application to medical school, they need to know you are certain you want to be a doctor because you have: Observed doctors in action Worked with patients Been exposed to a clinical environment   How do I get experience? This is daunting challenge, but it can be...

Experience is vital for an application to medical school, they need to know you are certain you want to be a doctor because you have:

Observed doctors in action

Worked with patients

Been exposed to a clinical environment

 

How do I get experience?

This is daunting challenge, but it can be achieved with perseverance and by thinking outside the box. Bear in mind you may be competing with other potential medical students at this stage for experience.

Contact your local hospital:

E-mail the relevant administration regarding voluntary work, an email only takes a few minutes but can be ignored.

If you haven’t heard after a few days, call them and ask them about voluntary work with regards to previous email. Be polite but persistent!

Take anything they can offer, a few days or even hours per week.

Contact your local GP

If you have a family doctor who you are relatively familiar with, don’t be afraid to mention your application and ask if you could shadow them for a few hours per week.

Often it will be difficult to contact the doctors directly (Don’t book an appointment just to ask!) Try calling the surgery and asking for an email address, or leave a note via the secretary.

Also bear in mind that while direct shadowing would be ideal, volunteering at the surgery in other ways would provide valuable experience. Providing insight into: How a GP surgery is run, the hours a GP works, the pace, the responsibilities etc.

Family friends

Ask around, does anyone in your family work in a hospital? If so, contact them and explain that you need some experience in a clinical environment.

They don’t necessarily need to be a doctor. A word or e-mail from hospital staff to the voluntary administration can make the difference.

Enlist family to talk about your application to their friends.

Ask your teachers, does your school or college have any direct contacts with hospital volunteer administrations?

Do you know a medical student? Could you shadow them?

Be optimistic!

Talk to people (It’s good practice): People at the gym, people at bus stops, customers at your day job etc.

Opportunities are everywhere and it’s not unknown for doctors to sympathise with friendly students, even if they met under random circumstances.

Good luck!

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1 year ago

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What is a spinal reflex arc?

An unconscious motor response to a sensory stimulus. Sensory stimulus: An external factor that has stimulated and started an impulse (Action potential) in sensory nerves. There are lots of different types of sensory nerves in the skin that respond to external signals such as heat, vibration, ...

An unconscious motor response to a sensory stimulus.

Sensory stimulus: An external factor that has stimulated and started an impulse (Action potential) in sensory nerves.

There are lots of different types of sensory nerves in the skin that respond to external signals such as heat, vibration, pressure.

The sensory nerve is activated (Depolarised).

The action potential transmits the sensory signal to the spinal cord, via afferent sensory nerves

 

Afferent sensory nerve (Afferent = Away from stimulus)

 

The signal is carried to the grey matter of the spinal cord

 

Unconscious motor response (Unconscious = bypassing the brain)

The signal from the sensory nerves is transmitted via synapses to interneurones

Interneurones connect to efferent somatic motor neurones.

The motor neurone sends signal to an effector muscle  which acts to move away from the stimulus.

This completes the spinal reflex arc!

Example: Your hand moving away from something hot.

Your hand moves before your brain can decide to do it voluntarily.

This saves time, removing your hand from the heat source faster than you could normally.

When it comes to burns every millisecond counts!

Note: You know you about the heat/pain as signals from the sensory nerves also travel up to your brain too (In the white matter). This takes a bit longer.

 

 

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1 year ago

447 views
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