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Gyen ming A.

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Degree: Physics Msci (Masters) - University College London University

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About me

Third year Physicist from University College London, ready to tutor Physics and Maths GCSE, A level, and Further A level. 

Hi, I'm Gyen Ming and I'm studying Physics at UCL. I'm looking toward doing a PhD in energy research, hopefully leading to work in nuclear fusion at ITER. 

I have a particular passion for tutoring GCSE and A level maths; the maths skills I learnt in school are the bread and butter of my every day work, and so I like to tie the abstract concepts in the textbook into how it's used in the real world. I've found it's much easier to remember something if you know why it's important! 

What do I tutor?

I've had experience tutoring maths from KS3 right up to Further Maths A level, and specialise in helping students over Summer to either catch up on last year's material, ready for possible retakes, or to get students that are looking toward Russel Group university applications ahead of the syllabus (this is especially essential for those considering Maths or Physics at Oxbridge!). With maths A level, I can tutor all core and further pure modules, mechanics up to M4, and statistics up to S2. 

I'm also prepared to tutor Physics at GCSE and A level if requested. 

I can also help with other aspects of university applications, such as going through personal statements

In sessions, we'll work through the relevant syllabus while also focusing on good maths technique with clean and logical working out, as I've found that improving fundamentals and eliminating silly mistakes are the best ways to easily improve grades. For A level students working toward university applications, we will work to add more ideas and concepts above and beyond the syllabus, helping you to stand out in interviews and be fully prepared for university level problem solving. 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Further Mathematics A Level £30 /hr
Maths A Level £30 /hr
Physics A Level £30 /hr
Maths GCSE £30 /hr
Physics GCSE £30 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
Further Mathematics A-LevelA*
Mathematics A-LevelA
PhysicsA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for new students

Ratings and reviews

4.8from 4 customer reviews

Alysen (Parent) December 15 2015

Your input yesterday was much appreciated. You put a positive spin on the subject that Charlie was resisting hard! We are very grateful and hope we can nudge him along in the right direction.

Alysen (Parent) October 13 2015

Really well done, very professional, helped me understand area's that have been badly explained in the past.

Alysen (Parent) April 15 2016

Najma (Parent) March 23 2016

See all reviews

Questions Gyen ming has answered

How do I sketch the locus of |z - 5-3i | = 3 on an Argand Diagram?

First, we use the idea that a complex number z can be written in terms of its real and imaginary parts, i.e. z = x+iy, to write our expression as:   | x+ iy -5 - 3i | = 3 Next, we can group the real and imaginary parts of the above expression, giving us: | (x-5) + i(y -3) | = 3   Now that...

First, we use the idea that a complex number z can be written in terms of its real and imaginary parts, i.e. z = x+iy, to write our expression as:

 

| x+ iy -5 - 3i | = 3

Next, we can group the real and imaginary parts of the above expression, giving us:

| (x-5) + i(y -3) | = 3

 

Now that the expression is in the form a+ib, we can use that the modulus of a complex number is the square root of (a2 + b2), to write our expression as:

[ (x-5)2 + (y-3)]1/2 = 3

 

Finally, by squaring both sides of the equation, we get:

 

(x-5)2 + (y-3) = 32

 

This sort of expression should look familiar to you; it's the standard equation for a circle!  So our final plot on our Argand diagram is of a circle center (5,3) with a radius of 3. By extending the ideas we've considered in this example, it follows that the expression |z- z1| = r represents a circle centered at z1 = x1 + iy1, with a radius r

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2 years ago

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