Rebecca T.

Rebecca T.

£30 - £32 /hr

English (Bachelors) - St Andrews University

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This tutor is also part of our Schools Programme. They are trusted by teachers to deliver high-quality 1:1 tuition that complements the school curriculum.

145 completed lessons

About me

Hi there !


I graduated with a first class honours degree in English Literature from the University of St Andrews last summer. Since I have completed a graduate diploma in law, and am now studying for the Bar of England and Wales.


At school I obtained straight As in my A Levels in English, History and French and have continued to pursue my passion for these subjects by reading widely. I have been tutoring now for five years and have lots of experience across age groups, exam syllabuses and modules. Over my time tutoring I have worked with children with special learning needs, like dyslexia and autism as well as with incredibly gifted children who have gone on to secure places at the best universities in the country. For the past three years I have taught at international summer schools teaching leadership programmes, critical thinking classes and communication skills. I have maintained contact with many of my tutees from over the years and can provide references on request.


At University I debated at a national and international level and achieved fourth place at the Scottish national championships in the final year of my degree. I encourage development of oral presentation skills alongside more traditional styles of academic presentation in order to boost students' natural confidence and to prepare them for life at University and in the real world.

Hi there !


I graduated with a first class honours degree in English Literature from the University of St Andrews last summer. Since I have completed a graduate diploma in law, and am now studying for the Bar of England and Wales.


At school I obtained straight As in my A Levels in English, History and French and have continued to pursue my passion for these subjects by reading widely. I have been tutoring now for five years and have lots of experience across age groups, exam syllabuses and modules. Over my time tutoring I have worked with children with special learning needs, like dyslexia and autism as well as with incredibly gifted children who have gone on to secure places at the best universities in the country. For the past three years I have taught at international summer schools teaching leadership programmes, critical thinking classes and communication skills. I have maintained contact with many of my tutees from over the years and can provide references on request.


At University I debated at a national and international level and achieved fourth place at the Scottish national championships in the final year of my degree. I encourage development of oral presentation skills alongside more traditional styles of academic presentation in order to boost students' natural confidence and to prepare them for life at University and in the real world.

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About my sessions

I have always approached my lessons as more of a friend than a particularly strict tutor. I am great at building a rapport with my tutees and have stayed in contact with many of them over the years. I believe students learn best when they learn to really love and enjoy a subject, so my lessons focus on building a real appreciation of what makes even the most turgid of exam modules interesting as well as developing exam technique across the year to make sure students are as ready for exams as they possibly can be.


I have a strong appreciation for the pressures on students particularly when they are trying to complete demanding and competitive academic programmes like A Levels and the International Baccleureate. Their time is at a premium, so I ensure that our lessons are always specifically targeted at their weaknesses and aimed at boosting their grade as much as possible. Many of the exam syllabuses taught today at all levels are best thought of as formulas that need to be learnt. Having taught for five years I have learnt the importance of keeping up to date with all syllabus changes; at this stage there is almost no course across the History and English A Level/i-Bac spectrum that I haven't worked with and when I do come across something new I always make the effort to learn the course content myself before I presume to try and teach it.

I have always approached my lessons as more of a friend than a particularly strict tutor. I am great at building a rapport with my tutees and have stayed in contact with many of them over the years. I believe students learn best when they learn to really love and enjoy a subject, so my lessons focus on building a real appreciation of what makes even the most turgid of exam modules interesting as well as developing exam technique across the year to make sure students are as ready for exams as they possibly can be.


I have a strong appreciation for the pressures on students particularly when they are trying to complete demanding and competitive academic programmes like A Levels and the International Baccleureate. Their time is at a premium, so I ensure that our lessons are always specifically targeted at their weaknesses and aimed at boosting their grade as much as possible. Many of the exam syllabuses taught today at all levels are best thought of as formulas that need to be learnt. Having taught for five years I have learnt the importance of keeping up to date with all syllabus changes; at this stage there is almost no course across the History and English A Level/i-Bac spectrum that I haven't worked with and when I do come across something new I always make the effort to learn the course content myself before I presume to try and teach it.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Enhanced DBS Check

8 Oct, 2018

Ratings & Reviews

4.9
26 reviews
5
4
1
3
1
2
0
1
0
BA

Beverley Parent from Halesowen

15 Mar

good

BA

Beverley Parent from Halesowen

8 Mar

really good

BA

Beverley Parent from Halesowen

13 Feb

good

BA

Beverley Parent from Halesowen

8 Feb

good

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
English LiteratureA-level (A2)A
HistoryA-level (A2)A
FrenchA-level (A2)A
PsychologyA-level (A2)A

General Availability

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Pre 12pm
12 - 5pm
After 5pm

Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrice
EnglishA Level£32 /hr
EnglishGCSE£30 /hr
English LanguageGCSE£30 /hr
English LiteratureGCSE£30 /hr
HistoryGCSE£30 /hr
English13 Plus£30 /hr
English11 Plus£30 /hr

Questions Rebecca has answered

How should I approach an unseen poetry question in my exam?

First, take a moment to read through the poem and work out what it is quite literally about. It may take a couple of read-throughs to wrap your head around this, but this is nothing worry about, poetry can often be quite dense and hard to get to grips with. The next step is more tricky; try and think about what the poem is metaphorically about. Frequently poems will have a second level of meaning for you to access. It’s working out this level of meaning, and how it is created, which will enable you to obtain the higher marks in your exam. Take La Belle Dame Sans Merci by Keats as an example. Quite literally, a lonely knight is wandering through the countryside when he meets a beautiful woman who seduces him and then leaves him dilapidated. On a deeper level the poem seems to be about the pain of love, the cruelty of women and potentially about his own personal frustrations about his poetic output. Once you’ve established what that secondary meaning is the next stage is to understand how that meaning is being created. For the purposes of your exam it may be useful to memorise a list of common techniques to look for, as in the stress of the moment it can sometimes feel like everything you know about poetry has evaporated, and you’re left staring at a blank piece of verse that you have no way of cracking. A good place to start is form and style. You might not know off the top of your head that Keats is using a typical medieval ballad form, but you should be able to identify the use of quatrains. Check the syllable count of every line to see if you can establish any kind of metre, Keats alters iambic tetrameter and trimeter, but even an acknowledgement that the rhythm is regular and that the last line is always a little shorter will enable you to comment on the deliberately slow pace of the poem – an easy technique to a painful love story. Next think about aspects like rhyme, imagery, enjambment, caesura, tone, dialogue, symbolism, extended metaphors and remember to keep reflect on how these techniques are coming together to give you the impression of meaning that you got on your third or fourth read-through. Once you have a list of ideas try and group them thematically – for example, I might write a paragraph about how Keats uses the environment in the poem, a paragraph on the depiction of the faery and a paragraph on the medieval style (considering ideas of form and rhythm). Remember to keep your introduction and conclusion brief, using that space to simply tie your answer together by explaining what Keats is telling readers so you can focus in your paragraphs on how he does it. First, take a moment to read through the poem and work out what it is quite literally about. It may take a couple of read-throughs to wrap your head around this, but this is nothing worry about, poetry can often be quite dense and hard to get to grips with. The next step is more tricky; try and think about what the poem is metaphorically about. Frequently poems will have a second level of meaning for you to access. It’s working out this level of meaning, and how it is created, which will enable you to obtain the higher marks in your exam. Take La Belle Dame Sans Merci by Keats as an example. Quite literally, a lonely knight is wandering through the countryside when he meets a beautiful woman who seduces him and then leaves him dilapidated. On a deeper level the poem seems to be about the pain of love, the cruelty of women and potentially about his own personal frustrations about his poetic output. Once you’ve established what that secondary meaning is the next stage is to understand how that meaning is being created. For the purposes of your exam it may be useful to memorise a list of common techniques to look for, as in the stress of the moment it can sometimes feel like everything you know about poetry has evaporated, and you’re left staring at a blank piece of verse that you have no way of cracking. A good place to start is form and style. You might not know off the top of your head that Keats is using a typical medieval ballad form, but you should be able to identify the use of quatrains. Check the syllable count of every line to see if you can establish any kind of metre, Keats alters iambic tetrameter and trimeter, but even an acknowledgement that the rhythm is regular and that the last line is always a little shorter will enable you to comment on the deliberately slow pace of the poem – an easy technique to a painful love story. Next think about aspects like rhyme, imagery, enjambment, caesura, tone, dialogue, symbolism, extended metaphors and remember to keep reflect on how these techniques are coming together to give you the impression of meaning that you got on your third or fourth read-through. Once you have a list of ideas try and group them thematically – for example, I might write a paragraph about how Keats uses the environment in the poem, a paragraph on the depiction of the faery and a paragraph on the medieval style (considering ideas of form and rhythm). Remember to keep your introduction and conclusion brief, using that space to simply tie your answer together by explaining what Keats is telling readers so you can focus in your paragraphs on how he does it. 

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9 months ago

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