Hannah N. A Level History tutor, GCSE History tutor, GCSE English and...

Hannah N.

Currently unavailable: for new students

Degree: History (Bachelors) - St. Andrews Unversity University

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About me

About me:

Hi, I'm Hannah!

I am a third year MA (Hons) History student at the University of St Andrews and absolutely love History, Psychology and Literature.

I remember very clearly how tough GCSE and A-level can be, and would love to give a helping hand to those who need a boost to confidently secure the grades that they want.

I am patient and enthusiastic, and would love to share my passion for these subjects with you!

Experience

I have assisted GCSE History and English students with exam preparation through methods such as board games, essay evaluation and structuring and simply talking through things that are tricky to understand.

I also have experience helping A-level students with their coursework. I have supported them through the development of their coursework question, the sourcing of information, and the structuring of their essays, whilst ensuring that everything that they did was entirely thier own work.

The most wonderful thing about these experiences was when a student suddenly understood a difficult concept, or came up with an interesting idea. Those 'light-bulb' moments are a delight to see!

Your Session with Me

Each session is completely different depending on what you require. The sessions are guided by you.

Whether it is learning how to structure essays for top marks, wow the examiner with terminology, or get you head around a tricky concept, there are so many ways that we can work together.

We will discuss what methods you think may help you, but some that I like to include are games ('board games', spoken games, writing games), engaging discussion, organising ideas in fun and colourful ways, and hands-on essay evaluation.

I hope that we can enjoy the sessions as well as achieve something great!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
History A Level £20 /hr
English Literature GCSE £18 /hr
English and World Literature GCSE £18 /hr
History GCSE £18 /hr
Psychology GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
English literatureA-LevelA
HistoryA-LevelA
PsychologyA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

25/09/2011

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for new students

Ratings and reviews

5from 2 customer reviews

Abby (Parent) August 26 2015

Excellent Tutor !! My children really enjoyed their lessons with Hannah. I have also noticed improvements in their school work after a few lesson.

Bami (Student) August 5 2015

Really helpful and informative tutorial :)

Questions Hannah has answered

How do I revise novels my English Literature GCSE exam?

Firstly, make sure that you understand and can remember the plot of the book. If you have not made summarising notes throughout the year, do not worry. Although your personal notes are better as they are more tailored to you, websites such as Sparknotes are extremely useful for reminding you o...

Firstly, make sure that you understand and can remember the plot of the book. If you have not made summarising notes throughout the year, do not worry. Although your personal notes are better as they are more tailored to you, websites such as Sparknotes are extremely useful for reminding you of the plots of books. From these summaries, make your own, more concise notes to read over- this way you are doing something practical (reading alone is rarely effective revision). Perhaps make flashcards of the key points to keep going over.

Next it is crucial to revise the key themes of the book. Make a list of all of the themes that you can think of- start with the obvious ones and go until you cannot think of anymore, even if the final themes on your list are tenuous.

If on your exam board you have to compare multiple novels, do the above for both books and then see which themes match. Even if you have not used exactly the same words to describe the themes, they may still match. Maybe create a venn diagram to enable you to visualise which themes connect the novels.

It is useful to create a mindmap of each theme to expand on why the themes are important, how they are presented in the plot, stylistic devices and structure of the novels, and (if relevant) how they connect the different novels. This should provide you with lots of ideas to draw upon in an exam.

Next it is important that you learn some key quotes that relate to each theme. Quotes which work for more than one theme are great! Even if your exam is ‘open text’ (you are allowed the book in the exam), it is always useful to know some quotes because flipping through a book looking for a quote soaks up valuable exam time. The process of learning quotes also helps you to gain a deeper understanding of the text.

Even if your themes do not come up in the exam, because you have covered so many in your revision it should not be too difficult to adapt your ideas and your knowledge to the question.

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2 years ago

584 views

How should I approach source questions in the exam?

That depends an awful lot on the question itself. Source questions can seem really scary, especially if you haven’t seen the source before, but there are a few little tricks which make it a lot more manageable. First of all, there are some key ‘buzz words’ that it is really important to look ...

That depends an awful lot on the question itself. Source questions can seem really scary, especially if you haven’t seen the source before, but there are a few little tricks which make it a lot more manageable.

First of all, there are some key ‘buzz words’ that it is really important to look out for.

For example, words and phrases that often crop up included ‘what does this teach us/ suggest about…’, ‘are you surprised by this source….’, ‘how useful is the source...’.

For now, let’s discuss the ‘shortcut’ for remembering how to structure your answers to questions including the phrase ‘what does this teach us/ suggest about…’. Remember: MASK. ‘M’ stands for MESSAGE- what did the author/ creator of this source aim to transmit to the reader/ consumer? ‘A’ stands for AUDIENCE- who is the intended audience for the source? ‘S’ stands for SOURCE- use some evidence from the source. ‘K’ stands for KNOWLEDGE- bring in some of your own knowledge, perhaps to explain why the information in the source is important to our understanding of the topic (without this you will not have fully answered the question).

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2 years ago

413 views

Why can longitudinal studies be problematic?

Longitudinal studies are those which are carried out over a long period of time. Longitudinal studies can be problematic because, over time, participants may drop out. This is an issue because it leaves the experimenter with a reduced sample size, meaning that the results may be less generalis...

Longitudinal studies are those which are carried out over a long period of time. Longitudinal studies can be problematic because, over time, participants may drop out. This is an issue because it leaves the experimenter with a reduced sample size, meaning that the results may be less generalisable to the general target population.

This is called attrition. Throw in this word and the examiner will be impressed.

In an essay, you can use this as a negative evaluation of a particular study.

For example, you could structure the paragraph this way:

-Say that an issue with the study is that it is longitudinal

-Explain what a longitudinal study is

-Give evidence of this (how long was the study?)

-Say that this may leave the study vulnerable to attrition

-Note how many participants were in the study (if you know) and explain that this number may diminish overtime as participants drop out

-Explain the affect that this may have on the results (less generalisable)

It might be good to put such a paragraph as this after a paragraph praising the study for having a large number of participants, or else a paragraph praising the volume of data that can be gained from a longitudinal study.

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2 years ago

361 views
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