Hope D. GCSE Classical Greek tutor, A Level Classical Greek tutor, GC...

Hope D.

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Degree: Classics (Bachelors) - Oxford, Balliol College University

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About me

Hi! I'm Hope and I'm studying Classics at Balliol College, Oxford. Having studied Latin for 10 years and Greek for 7, I know that getting to grips with the languages can be tough at times and I would love to help you through this.

I love Classics, and I think that the more it can be brought alive the easier it becomes to learn. I can tailor sessions to your needs, whether it be talking through tricky translations or going over in more depth difficult constructions, just let me know!

My main goal is to help as many people as possible engage with the Classics. I have two younger brothers who aren't exactly as passionate about Latin and Greek as I am, and having coached them in the subject I know what it is like to work with students who don't share my enthusiasm.

With that being said, if you're looking to advance your knowledge beyond the syllabus I'd love to help! I can even teach introductory prose composition in both languages if you wish.

If you're interested in finding out more, do drop me a WebMail message or book a Meet-the-Tutor session, I look forward to meeting you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Classical Greek A Level £20 /hr
Latin A Level £20 /hr
Classical Greek GCSE £18 /hr
Latin GCSE £18 /hr
Classical Greek 13 Plus £18 /hr
Latin 13 Plus £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
HistoryA-LevelA
Ancient GreekA-LevelA*
LatinA-LevelA*
Maths ASA-LevelA
Further Maths ASA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: no new students

Questions Hope has answered

How is the perfect passive participle formed and used in Latin?

The perfect passive participle is found in the fourth column of principal parts tables. It is formed differently in each conjugation: First: -atus (amatus) Second: -itus/irregular (monitus) Third: mostly irregular Fourth: -itus (auditus) Those parts that are irregular must be learned throug...

The perfect passive participle is found in the fourth column of principal parts tables. It is formed differently in each conjugation:

First: -atus (amatus)

Second: -itus/irregular (monitus)

Third: mostly irregular

Fourth: -itus (auditus)

Those parts that are irregular must be learned through principal parts tables. All parts are declined like a 1st/2nd declension adjective.

When translating a perfect passive participle, we must bear in mind its tense and voice. It is a prior action and passive. Therefore it is translated literally as 'having been'.

The participle always agrees in case, gender and number with the noun it is describing.

Eg.

urbem captam incenderunt - they burned the having-been-captured city

Or:

they burned the city that had been captured

Or better:

they captured and burned the city

The PPP can also be used as part of an ablative absolute.

The ablative absolute usually has a noun and participle agreeing in number and gender in the ablative case.

It is translated literally as 'with the NOUN having been VERB-ed,...'

Eg. urbe capta, rex discessit.

With the city having been captured, the king left.

This can be improved in a number of ways depending on the sense:

After he captured the city, the king...

When/since he captured the city, the king...

Having captured the city, the king...

In order to determine the best translation of an ablative absolute, you must look to the context within the sentence/passage.

 

 

 

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1 year ago

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