Nicholas O. GCSE English tutor, 13 plus  English tutor, A Level Engli...

Nicholas O.

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Degree: English Literature (Bachelors) - Durham University

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About me

I am passionate about the study of English Literature and ready to help students of any level achieve their full potential. I am well aware of how to produce top quality work in public examinations and coursework. This awareness is grounded in the fact that I have sat many of the exams my prospective students will be preparing for and fully understand the frustratingly specific demands of mark schemes. 

Having achieved 3 A*s at A-Level in English Literature, Philosophy, and Politics, I joined the English Faculty at Durham University. I am a still at Durham and have just finished my Second Year at the end of which I was awarded an overall First. I have tutoring experience from my time at Durham as I volunteered to tutor an AS Level student in my first year. 

No tutoring task will be too small or big. As well as being willing to help students over a long period of time, I would be delighted to help students on just one essay or just one difficult poem. 

As an English Student, I have very few contact hours at University so am extremely flexible and shouldn't find it too hard to fit students into my schedule. 

Do feel free to book an introductory 'Meet-the-Tutor' session and I very much hope I can help you in the future.  

I hope I can be a fun and engaging tutor. English is such an interesting, exciting subject and I really want that to come accross in my sessions.

 

 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
English A Level £20 /hr
English GCSE £18 /hr
English 13 Plus £18 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
English LiteratureA-LevelA*
Government and PoliticsA-LevelA*
Philosophy and EthicsA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

02/06/2015

CRB/DBS Enhanced

23/07/2015

Currently unavailable: no new students

Questions Nicholas has answered

Explain the difference between synecdoche and metonymy.

Synecdoche and metonymy are two different types of metaphor. Whilst the former is a type of metaphor in which a part stands for the whole (e.g workers being reduced to 'hands' in Dickens's Hard Times), the latter is a type of metaphor where the chosen image is closely related to, but not actua...

Synecdoche and metonymy are two different types of metaphor. Whilst the former is a type of metaphor in which a part stands for the whole (e.g workers being reduced to 'hands' in Dickens's Hard Times), the latter is a type of metaphor where the chosen image is closely related to, but not actually part of, the subject (e.g The Crown standing for The Monarchy or the White House standing for The President). 

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1 year ago

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What is the difference between descriptive and analytical writing? Which is better?

In order to break into the top bands in any GCSE literature essay, a student must write analytically, not descriptively. Rather than merely detailing what has happened in a story, one should strive to explain the significance of moments in the story, comment on the effects of individual lingui...

In order to break into the top bands in any GCSE literature essay, a student must write analytically, not descriptively. Rather than merely detailing what has happened in a story, one should strive to explain the significance of moments in the story, comment on the effects of individual linguistic choices, and draw conclusions. A simple way to ensure one writes analytically not descriptively is to opt to start sentences with the word 'When' and never 'Then'. 

Example" Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

Bad descriptive writing: 

Then Tom arrives at the scene of the accident and, seeing the large crowd, exclaims 'That's good. Wilson'll have a little business at last.' 

Good analytical writing:

When Tom arrives at the scene of the accident his callous, joking exclamation 'That's Good. Wilson'll have a little business at last' demonstrates Fitzgerald's sophisicated use of Nick Carroway as narrator as the line adds a level of dramatic irony. Owing to Fitzgerald's complex narrative stucture, the reader, unlike Tom, is fully aware that Tom's mistress, Myrtle, has just been hideously killed by Gatsby's car. It is ironic that Tom is making fun of the accident because he will be utterly devastated as soon as he realises who it is that died. 

 

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1 year ago

504 views
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