Alex W. GCSE Maths tutor, A Level Maths tutor, Uni Admissions Test Ma...

Alex W.

Currently unavailable: no new students

Degree: Mathematics and Philosophy (Masters) - Oxford, Pembroke College University

Contact Alex
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Alex

About me

Hi, my name's Alex, I've just finished my first year at Oxford University, studying Mathematics and Philosophy, and I'm looking to help you achieve the best you can in your next set of exams - whether they're GCSEs, A levels or admissions tests.

Having had my own tuition for the admissions test required for my university application, I felt inspired to help out students who are now in the same situation as I was. My tutor was superb and I owe a lot to him for his guidance which ultimately allowed me to study at my dream university. I'd be honoured if I could help you to attain your perfect result in an exam you're finding particularly tricky, and I feel that I have the knowledge and track record to allow me to do that.

At college, I offered tuition to a variety of younger students, particularly for GCSE and A level Maths. All of my students came to me with things they found especially difficult, before moving on to general exam practice, and this approach meant that all of my students got exactly what they wanted on results day.

I try to keep a balance between general tuition, answering the student's queries and past paper questions in my lessons in order to keep the sessions interesting. I'd also be willing to help guide students on personal statements and the Oxbridge interview process, with pleasure.

Overall, my first year has really motivated my passion for my degree, and I'd love to pass that on by helping you to succeed in your own exams come summer!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Extended Project Qualification A Level £20 /hr
Further Mathematics A Level £20 /hr
Maths A Level £20 /hr
Philosophy A Level £20 /hr
English Literature GCSE £18 /hr
Further Mathematics GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Philosophy GCSE £18 /hr
.MAT. Uni Admissions Test £25 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathematicsA-LevelA*
Further MathematicsA-LevelA*
English LiteratureA-LevelA
EPQA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: no new students

Questions Alex has answered

How can I integrate e^x sinx?

Such an integral looks difficult to manage; clearly it is a case of integration by parts, but neither part of the product appears to reduce easily into a nicer form. The key here is use the fact that sinx has a cyclic pattern when it is repatedley differentiated. Keeping our orignal integral ...

Such an integral looks difficult to manage; clearly it is a case of integration by parts, but neither part of the product appears to reduce easily into a nicer form.

The key here is use the fact that sinx has a cyclic pattern when it is repatedley differentiated. Keeping our orignal integral on the left hand side, after two applications of integration by parts, where sinx is the term to be differentiated, we obtain a second intance of the integral on the right hand side of the equation. Moving this integral to the left hand side with our original integral and dividing the equation by two, we acquire the required result.

see more

1 year ago

306 views

Why is the "No False Lemmas" approach an inadequate repair to the JTB account of knowledge?

It has been shown that replacing the justification condition in the classical account of knowledge is neither necessary, nor sufficient, to grant a person knowledge.  Consider a person driving through 'Barn Facade country', when he happens to see the only real barn in the vicinity and forms t...

It has been shown that replacing the justification condition in the classical account of knowledge is neither necessary, nor sufficient, to grant a person knowledge. 

Consider a person driving through 'Barn Facade country', when he happens to see the only real barn in the vicinity and forms the true belief that there is a barn in the field. Clearly this passes the 'No False Lemma' approach, but this "knowledge" was obtained in an entirely lucky fashion, so one would be relcutant to truly grant this person knowledge; thus the approach is not sufficient to guarentee knowledge.

Similarly, imagine a person who sees a large crowd from a distance and is told by an onlooker "there a 80 people in that crowd", and consequently the person forms the true belief that there are more than 5 people in the crowd. However, it turns out there is only 79 people in the crowd - the onlooker was mistaken. Here, we would certainly want to grant the person knowledge but 'No False Lemmas' denies this. Hence it is also not necessary for knowledge.

see more

1 year ago

476 views
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Alex

Still comparing tutors?

How do we connect with a tutor?

Where are they based?

How much does tuition cost?

How do tutorials work?

Cookies:

We use cookies to improve our service. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok