Charlotte R. GCSE Arabic tutor, A Level Arabic tutor, GCSE English tu...

Charlotte R.

Currently unavailable: until 14/12/2015

Degree: Oriental Studies: Arabic (Bachelors) - Oxford, St John's College University

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About me

About Me:

I am currently studying Arabic and Oriental Studies at Oxford University. I have just arrived back in the UK from my year abroad studying at IFPO in Amman, Jordan and am looking forward to entering my 3rd year of study at Oxford in October. 

Until now over half the tuition I have received in Arabic has been in Arabic speaking countries and under native speaking teachers: in Muscat, Oman as well as in Jordan. The rest of my study has been as part of the very intensive Arabic programme in the Oriental Institute at Oxford, so I am comfortable using the language in an everyday, conversational context, as well as in a slightly more advanced and academic context. 

Tutoring sessions:

Language: I have experienced first hand how Arabic can be a tricky language to get to grips with in the beginning but I am living proof that it's not as impossible as some would like to make out! I will tailor clear and concise explanations of grammatical and linguisting concepts to make it as interesting and easy as possible for you to remember. Depending upon your style of learning and the areas you wish to focus on I will help you with interesting and varied activities to work on reading, writing, speaking and listening skills and incorporate the use of spoken Arabic as much as possible to really help you find your feet in the language. Above all I want our sessions to be as fun and intuitive as possible as I find that is the key to being  able to use the language in a confident and well rounded way! 

Literature: I studied English Literature at A Level and a key component of my course at Oxford is the study of Classical and Modern Arabic Literature, often from a comparative perspective. I am familiar and comfortable with the concepts and principles of literary study and will help guide you through the process of writing essays, exams and coursework to express your ideas and knowledge in the best way possible. Literature is one of my first loves and I am keen to share that enthusiam!

Arabic Language and Literature can be a challenging field of study but it can also be incredibly rewarding. I would love to help you through those tricky stages to really get the most out of your study and realise your potential! 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Arabic A Level £20 /hr
English Literature A Level £20 /hr
Arabic GCSE £18 /hr
English GCSE £18 /hr
English Literature GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
SpanishA-LevelA
ArtA-LevelA*
English LiteratureA-LevelA
History AS LevelA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

26/09/2012

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: until

14/12/2015

Questions Charlotte has answered

How do future tense verbs work in Arabic?

The future tense is very easy to form and use in Arabic. Simply take the appropriate form of the verb in the present tense: أفعل I do تفعل You (masculine singular) do تفعلين You (feminine singular) do يفعل He does تفعل She does نفعل We do تفعلون You (masculine or mixed group plural) do تفعلنّ Y...

The future tense is very easy to form and use in Arabic. Simply take the appropriate form of the verb in the present tense:

أفعل I do
تفعل You (masculine singular) do
تفعلين You (feminine singular) do
يفعل He does
تفعل She does
نفعل We do
تفعلون You (masculine or mixed group plural) do
تفعلنّ You (feminine plural) do
يفعلون They (masculine or mixed group plural) do
يفعلنّ They (feminine plural) do 

And then add the prefix "will." To do so you can use سوف which is written as a separate word; or س which is attached to the start of the verb. For example:

سوف أفعل I will do

سأفعل I will do

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1 year ago

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How do past tense verbs work in Arabic?

Past tense verbs work exactly like present tense verbs only with a different set of modifications to show the subject of the verb:   فعلتُ I did فعلتَ You (masculine singular) did فعلتِYou (feminine singular) did فعل He did فعلَت She did فعلنا We did فعلتم You (masculine or mixed group plural) ...

Past tense verbs work exactly like present tense verbs only with a different set of modifications to show the subject of the verb:
 

فعلتُ I did
فعلتَ You (masculine singular) did
فعلتِYou (feminine singular) did
فعل He did
فعلَت She did
فعلنا We did
فعلتم You (masculine or mixed group plural) did
فعلتنّ You (feminine plural) did
فعلوا They (masculine or mixed group plural) did
فعلنّ They (feminine plural) did

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1 year ago

281 views

How do present tense verbs work in Arabic

There are a few simple rules for using present tense verbs correctly in Arabic.  1. The verb needs to be modified to show who is doing the action, this is done using specific prefixes and suffixes to the basic form of the verb. يفعل (he does) is used as the basic model of present tense verb f...

There are a few simple rules for using present tense verbs correctly in Arabic. 

1. The verb needs to be modified to show who is doing the action, this is done using specific prefixes and suffixes to the basic form of the verb. يفعل (he does) is used as the basic model of present tense verb forms in Arabic.
أفعل I do
تفعل You (masculine singular) do
تفعلين You (feminine singular) do
يفعل He does
تفعل She does
نفعل We do
تفعلون You (masculine or mixed group plural) do
تفعلنّ You (feminine plural) do
يفعلون They (masculine or mixed group plural) do
يفعلنّ They (feminine plural) do 

There are also masculine and feminine dual forms (for when two people are doing an action) for the 2nd and 3rd person (you and they) but it is worth learning those alongide the dual forms for nouns and adjectives. 

2. Wherever possible the verb should come at the start of the sentence, or as close to the start as possible. The verb is underlined in this example:
يذهب الولد إلى المدرسة The boy goes to school

3. Whenever the verb comes before the suject (the person doing the action)-which should be most of the time-it will take the singular form in the appropriate gender for the subject, even when the subject is plural. The verb is underlined in the following example: 
يذهب الاولاد إلى المدرسة The boys go to school

4. For all non-human plural subjects we use the feminine singular form of the verb, even when the singular form of the noun is masculine. The verb is underlined in the following examples. 
تذهب الكلاب إلي البيت The dogs go to the house (كلب the singular form of dog is masculine)
تذهب السيارات إلي الكراج The cars go to the garage (سيارة the singular form of car is feminine)

- See more at: https://www.mytutorweb.co.uk/tutors/secure/ta-yourexplanations.html#sthash.7YtdkJBJ.dpuf

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1 year ago

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