Emily C.

Emily C.

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English Literature (Bachelors) - Newcastle University

18 completed lessons

About me

I am an enthusiastic English Literature student at Newcastle University because there is nothing more fascinating to me than delving into a good piece of literature, whether that be a novel, a poem or a play! I also love Psychology as I find learning about the functions of the mind extremely interesting, alongside the subject aiding my critical thinking. Philosophy and Ethics was also a fantastic subject to study as there is so much to learn! The infinite feeling to the subject therefore intrigued me and it tied in well with studying Psychology and English. Admittedly I have had ups and downs with exams throughout my education, but I have come out the other side and ended up where I want to be, so I would love to help others do the same! I also had some trouble with applying to University with my personal statement, so this motivates me to help others who may be going through the same. At University I write for the student newspaper, The Courier, as this not only aids my writing skill and style, but it is fun for me and has a social aspect to it. I am also in the yoga society at University as this helps me relax and again has a social aspect to it - like pretty much everything at University! I currently run 2 to 3 times a week with an aim to complete the Great North Run in 2019 to start my final year of University with a bang.

I am an enthusiastic English Literature student at Newcastle University because there is nothing more fascinating to me than delving into a good piece of literature, whether that be a novel, a poem or a play! I also love Psychology as I find learning about the functions of the mind extremely interesting, alongside the subject aiding my critical thinking. Philosophy and Ethics was also a fantastic subject to study as there is so much to learn! The infinite feeling to the subject therefore intrigued me and it tied in well with studying Psychology and English. Admittedly I have had ups and downs with exams throughout my education, but I have come out the other side and ended up where I want to be, so I would love to help others do the same! I also had some trouble with applying to University with my personal statement, so this motivates me to help others who may be going through the same. At University I write for the student newspaper, The Courier, as this not only aids my writing skill and style, but it is fun for me and has a social aspect to it. I am also in the yoga society at University as this helps me relax and again has a social aspect to it - like pretty much everything at University! I currently run 2 to 3 times a week with an aim to complete the Great North Run in 2019 to start my final year of University with a bang.

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About my sessions

I will help students improve by getting to know them and their preferred study techniques. Personally, I liked writing colourful notes, learning them and practising exam questions. However such techniques aren’t for everyone, so looking at other techniques (like flashcards and bubble maps) and exploring diversity within education is crucial. It is key for the student to provide me with their goals too. These goals must be realistic, however with a tutor, you can push yourself to achieve higher than expected, so they are changeable! These goals and working with the student will allow me to identify strengths and weaknesses. Working on weaknesses is paramount to academic success, however, strengths can’t be neglected so I would also expect the student to show off their pre-existing skills to me! I will also ensure that the student is individually catered to in the content and structure of the lesson, as as I mentioned earlier, the diversity in education is huge so it is important to address individual needs. I would also like to stress that communication is vital. If you like something, found something difficult or enjoyed something, I would love to know! This will help me improve your sessions and get to know you, as well as benefit your education and maximise your potential. Lastly, it is important for my students to have a healthy body and mind alongside their studies so hearing what they do outside of study would be great.

I will help students improve by getting to know them and their preferred study techniques. Personally, I liked writing colourful notes, learning them and practising exam questions. However such techniques aren’t for everyone, so looking at other techniques (like flashcards and bubble maps) and exploring diversity within education is crucial. It is key for the student to provide me with their goals too. These goals must be realistic, however with a tutor, you can push yourself to achieve higher than expected, so they are changeable! These goals and working with the student will allow me to identify strengths and weaknesses. Working on weaknesses is paramount to academic success, however, strengths can’t be neglected so I would also expect the student to show off their pre-existing skills to me! I will also ensure that the student is individually catered to in the content and structure of the lesson, as as I mentioned earlier, the diversity in education is huge so it is important to address individual needs. I would also like to stress that communication is vital. If you like something, found something difficult or enjoyed something, I would love to know! This will help me improve your sessions and get to know you, as well as benefit your education and maximise your potential. Lastly, it is important for my students to have a healthy body and mind alongside their studies so hearing what they do outside of study would be great.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Ratings & Reviews

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7 reviews
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LW

Lauren Student

15 Mar

Cant recommend Emily enough. After going through my essay last week and going from a low pass to at least a C has given me so much confidence!

LW

Lauren Student

28 Feb

So helpful. Loved my first lesson with Emily! She definitley knows her content and has great revision techniques! :)

JW

Jane Parent from Nuneaton

9 Mar

LW

Lauren Student

7 Mar

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
English LiteratureA-level (A2)B
PsychologyA-level (A2)A*
Philosophy and EthicsA-level (A2)A

General Availability

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Pre 12pm
12 - 5pm
After 5pm

Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrice
English LiteratureA Level£24 /hr
Philosophy and EthicsA Level£24 /hr
PsychologyA Level£24 /hr
English LiteratureGCSE£20 /hr
Philosophy and EthicsGCSE£20 /hr
PsychologyGCSE£20 /hr
Personal StatementsMentoring£24 /hr

Questions Emily has answered

Explain the different challenges to religious experience.

You should approach this question by considering the main 4 challenges to religious experience - psychological explanations, physiological explanations, differences in interpretations and the notion of a religious experience being logically impossible. You could choose 2 and go into great detail using both for and against arguments, however, in my opinion, it would be more beneficial to use all 4 arguments, with less comparative reference as the question says 'explain' rather than 'explore.' Using philosophers for each challenge is key to A2 philosophy as it demonstrates your knowledge of the subject's key scholars. A very brief plan for this essay should look something like this:
P1 - introduction - address the question and provide a clear-cut argument either for or against religious experience. P2 - psychological interpretation - FREUD (challenger) neurosis / childhood insecurities / desire for father figureP3 - physiological interpretation - meditating Buddhist monk study, 'casual operator' and 'holistic operator'P4 - JUNG'S challenge to the challenges - spiritual aspect of us is essential to psychological wholeness, supported by JAMESP5 - differences in interpretation - MARX (challenger) distraction from realityP6 - logically impossible - KANT limited to the empirical world P7 - conclusion - offer your own opinion with who you agree with. Potentially include C.D. BROAD’S analogy of the blind person evolving the capacity to see, but don't introduce a new idea in your conclusion! It depends on what stance you take on your essay - for the challenge or against it.
You should approach this question by considering the main 4 challenges to religious experience - psychological explanations, physiological explanations, differences in interpretations and the notion of a religious experience being logically impossible. You could choose 2 and go into great detail using both for and against arguments, however, in my opinion, it would be more beneficial to use all 4 arguments, with less comparative reference as the question says 'explain' rather than 'explore.' Using philosophers for each challenge is key to A2 philosophy as it demonstrates your knowledge of the subject's key scholars. A very brief plan for this essay should look something like this:
P1 - introduction - address the question and provide a clear-cut argument either for or against religious experience. P2 - psychological interpretation - FREUD (challenger) neurosis / childhood insecurities / desire for father figureP3 - physiological interpretation - meditating Buddhist monk study, 'casual operator' and 'holistic operator'P4 - JUNG'S challenge to the challenges - spiritual aspect of us is essential to psychological wholeness, supported by JAMESP5 - differences in interpretation - MARX (challenger) distraction from realityP6 - logically impossible - KANT limited to the empirical world P7 - conclusion - offer your own opinion with who you agree with. Potentially include C.D. BROAD’S analogy of the blind person evolving the capacity to see, but don't introduce a new idea in your conclusion! It depends on what stance you take on your essay - for the challenge or against it.

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6 months ago

102 views

How does Margaret Atwood present Moira's character in 'The Handmaid's Tale?'

As a feminist and lesbian, Moira is immediately presented as an unconventional, rebellious character as such identifications are in fact illegal in the misogynistic and patriarchal society of Gilead. As a result, Atwood presents Moira as the physical embodiment of rebellion and freedom within the novel. Atwood uses the simile “[she] is like an elevator with open sides” to describe Moira, implying that there is a dangerous side to her character. This creates an aura of risk to Moira’s character, reflecting her reckless attempt to escape the Red Centre because she was “going bats.” Furthermore, elevators give us freedom of movement so it can be argued that Moira is the initiator for freedom in the novel. This presents her as a free-spirit because regardless of the consequences she will do what it takes to make her happy, highlighting her rebellious side.
Atwood also describes Moira “sitting on the edge of [Offred’s] bed, legs crossed, ankle on knee” creating a masculine image of her. This is further emphasised when Atwood describes her “purple overalls,” as overalls are typically associated with masculine professions, such as a plumber or an electrician. The masculine image of Moira presents her as a free woman because it highlights that she has chosen to wear these clothes and act in a masculine way, again connoting that Moira does things to make her happy regardless of the consequences in the oppressive society of Gilead. As Atwood describes her, Moira is a “loose woman” and within the novel she signifies freedom because of this. The description is one of many within the novel that creates a contrast between how women were treated before Gilead, and how they are treated now in Gilead. This gives the reader the opportunity to realise how much women have had taken away from them, resulting in the reader feeling sympathetic for females within the novel.
Atwood also presents Moira as role model within the text, which is highlighted when Offred describes Moira as “[their] fantasy.” This implies that Moira’s actions aren’t a reality for Offred and the other Handmaids which highlights her unorthodox nature, relating back to her “purple overalls” as purple signifies eccentricity and individuality. Atwood uses the metaphor “she was the lava beneath the crust of daily life” to describe Moira, implying that the rising rebellious movement in Gilead is just beneath the surface, ready to “erupt.” The metaphor suggests that the crust can easily be broken, because the lava is just “beneath the crust” thus creating a sense of fragility to the Gilead society. Atwood presents Moira to have the ability to “break the crust”, creating an image of an exploding volcano which suggests that Moira has the potential to be a powerful character, and has the ability to start a movement that would break the structure of Gilead. Furthermore, Offred admits that “[she] feels safe that Moira is here” suggesting that Moira provides a sense of comfort and reassurance for Offred. The fact that Atwood switches to present tense with the use of “here” is significant also, as it implies that Offred’s memory of Moira is the only thing keeping her sane while she is a Handmaid. Due to this, Moira’s character becomes that of a role model within the novel as Offred is admiring her in order to remain calm to survive Gilead’s strict laws and principles that she ought to abide by.
Ultimately, Atwood presents Moira as a free spirit that defies convention so as a result she uses her character to allow the reader to understand and acknowledge that there is always potential for change if you desire it. As a result I feel that through Moira’s character, Atwood portrays the message that we should not suffer in silence and feel the need to submit to authority in dictatorial circumstances. Therefore, Atwood uses Moira’s character to give the novel a sense of hope that Gilead will one day change for the better and that women will no longer be subject to antiquated biblical views.

As a feminist and lesbian, Moira is immediately presented as an unconventional, rebellious character as such identifications are in fact illegal in the misogynistic and patriarchal society of Gilead. As a result, Atwood presents Moira as the physical embodiment of rebellion and freedom within the novel. Atwood uses the simile “[she] is like an elevator with open sides” to describe Moira, implying that there is a dangerous side to her character. This creates an aura of risk to Moira’s character, reflecting her reckless attempt to escape the Red Centre because she was “going bats.” Furthermore, elevators give us freedom of movement so it can be argued that Moira is the initiator for freedom in the novel. This presents her as a free-spirit because regardless of the consequences she will do what it takes to make her happy, highlighting her rebellious side.
Atwood also describes Moira “sitting on the edge of [Offred’s] bed, legs crossed, ankle on knee” creating a masculine image of her. This is further emphasised when Atwood describes her “purple overalls,” as overalls are typically associated with masculine professions, such as a plumber or an electrician. The masculine image of Moira presents her as a free woman because it highlights that she has chosen to wear these clothes and act in a masculine way, again connoting that Moira does things to make her happy regardless of the consequences in the oppressive society of Gilead. As Atwood describes her, Moira is a “loose woman” and within the novel she signifies freedom because of this. The description is one of many within the novel that creates a contrast between how women were treated before Gilead, and how they are treated now in Gilead. This gives the reader the opportunity to realise how much women have had taken away from them, resulting in the reader feeling sympathetic for females within the novel.
Atwood also presents Moira as role model within the text, which is highlighted when Offred describes Moira as “[their] fantasy.” This implies that Moira’s actions aren’t a reality for Offred and the other Handmaids which highlights her unorthodox nature, relating back to her “purple overalls” as purple signifies eccentricity and individuality. Atwood uses the metaphor “she was the lava beneath the crust of daily life” to describe Moira, implying that the rising rebellious movement in Gilead is just beneath the surface, ready to “erupt.” The metaphor suggests that the crust can easily be broken, because the lava is just “beneath the crust” thus creating a sense of fragility to the Gilead society. Atwood presents Moira to have the ability to “break the crust”, creating an image of an exploding volcano which suggests that Moira has the potential to be a powerful character, and has the ability to start a movement that would break the structure of Gilead. Furthermore, Offred admits that “[she] feels safe that Moira is here” suggesting that Moira provides a sense of comfort and reassurance for Offred. The fact that Atwood switches to present tense with the use of “here” is significant also, as it implies that Offred’s memory of Moira is the only thing keeping her sane while she is a Handmaid. Due to this, Moira’s character becomes that of a role model within the novel as Offred is admiring her in order to remain calm to survive Gilead’s strict laws and principles that she ought to abide by.
Ultimately, Atwood presents Moira as a free spirit that defies convention so as a result she uses her character to allow the reader to understand and acknowledge that there is always potential for change if you desire it. As a result I feel that through Moira’s character, Atwood portrays the message that we should not suffer in silence and feel the need to submit to authority in dictatorial circumstances. Therefore, Atwood uses Moira’s character to give the novel a sense of hope that Gilead will one day change for the better and that women will no longer be subject to antiquated biblical views.

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6 months ago

592 views

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