Jack T. GCSE Chemistry tutor, A Level Chemistry tutor

Jack T.

Currently unavailable: for new students

Degree: Chemistry (Bachelors) - Leeds University

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About me

About Me:

Hello, I'm Jack and I am a chemistry student at the University of Leeds. I have always loved science, in particular chemistry. I like knowing why things happen on a molecular level, for example, why does bread brown during toasting? But I also understand how difficult chemistry can be, it has a language of its own.

I am very patient as I am the oldest of eight children. I have volunteered in a lower school for 5 years, so I have a lot of experience teaching with people as young as 5 years old. I have also tutored local GCSE and A-Level students before. I have A* in all my science GCSE's and 5 A grades as well. 

The Sessions:

During the sessions, you will be in charge of what we cover. In science understanding the basic principles are essential. Once you understand them, you should be able to apply that knowledge and answer any question that is thrown at you during the exam. We will spend as much time as you need on a topic to make sure that this is case.

I will use as many different ways to explain a concept as I can, such as diagrams, drawings, words, metaphors and mnemonics. Hopefully by using these techniques you will quickly become confident enough to explain the concept to me.

I hope the sessions will be fun! A lot of knowledge can be gained in 55 minutes especially if it is made engaging. Science is brilliant and I am determined to change your opinion if you think otherwise!

What next?

If you have any questions, send me a 'WebMail' or book a 'Meet the Tutor Session' you can do both through the website. Please include your exam board, and the topics you need help with. Any question you have can also be answered in the "Meet the Tutor" session.

I look forward to meeting you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Chemistry A Level £20 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
ChemistryA-LevelA
BiologyA-LevelB
MathsA-LevelC
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for new students

Questions Jack has answered

A metal oxide has a relative formula mass (Mr ) of 81. The formula of this metal oxide is MO. Given that the relative atomic mass (Ar ) of oxygen is 16, what is the metal in the metal oxide?

The formula of the metal oxide is MO, which means there is only one oxygen atom bonded to the metal. The Mr of a compound is the sum of Ar of the elements that make up the compound. So, from this we can construct a equation. Mr of MO = Ar of oxygen + Ar of metal 81 = 16 + Ar of metal We can ...

The formula of the metal oxide is MO, which means there is only one oxygen atom bonded to the metal. The Mr of a compound is the sum of Ar of the elements that make up the compound. So, from this we can construct a equation.

Mr of MO = Ar of oxygen + Ar of metal

81 = 16 + Ar of metal

We can then rearrange the equation to give the Ar of the metal.

Ar of metal = 81 - 16

Ar of metal = 65

By looking at a periodic table we can see that the metal that has an Ar of 65 is Zinc. 

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1 year ago

1563 views

A walker falls through thin ice into very cold water. What does the body do to stop the core body temperature from falling too quickly?

The walker's body will do three things to help slow the decrease in core body temperature. The first is the walker will begin to shiver. Shivering is the spasming of muscles, the muscles as they work generate heat, through respiration, this heat helps to reduce the rate of temperature decrease...

The walker's body will do three things to help slow the decrease in core body temperature. The first is the walker will begin to shiver. Shivering is the spasming of muscles, the muscles as they work generate heat, through respiration, this heat helps to reduce the rate of temperature decrease.

Secondly the muscles at the root of the hairs on the arms and legs of the walker will contract, causing the hairs to stand on end. This is known as goosebumps. The hair will then trap a thin layer of insulating air, helping to slow the heat loss to the environment.

Thirdly the blood vessels in the extremities of the body, such as the hands and feet, will constrict. This is known as vasoconstriction, and this means that less blood is near the skin and so there is less heat loss to the environment.

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1 year ago

599 views

Without a catalyst, an alkene will react with bromine while benzene will not. Why is this?

The pi-bonds in benzene are delocalised over the entire ring, while in an alkene the pi-bonds are only delocalised over two carbon atoms. This means that benzene has a lower charge denisity than an alkene so benzene doesn't particularly polarise the bromine molecule. So no electrophilic additi...

The pi-bonds in benzene are delocalised over the entire ring, while in an alkene the pi-bonds are only delocalised over two carbon atoms. This means that benzene has a lower charge denisity than an alkene so benzene doesn't particularly polarise the bromine molecule. So no electrophilic addition between the bromine and benzene will take place.

The larger charge denisty of the alkene will mean that as the bromine molecule approaches the alkene it is polarised, the alkene can then donate its electrons to the positive bromide ion.

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1 year ago

329 views
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