PremiumJack M.

Jack M.

£40 /hr

MPhys (Masters) - Oxford, Wadham College University

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393 completed lessons

About me

Hi, I'm Jack, I’m an Oxford graduate (first class masters (MPhys) Sept 2018) with lots of experience tutoring and teaching. I studied Physics, Maths, Further Maths, Chemistry and an Extended Project at A-level achieving top marks across the board as well as passing the Physics Aptitude Test and the Oxford admissions interviews. That's not to say that I found all of that easy or stress free (believe me I didn’t!) so I’d like to pass on my knowledge to students so that I can help them understand the subject, feel confident going into exams and ultimately achieve the grades they deserve. Of course I’m a massive nerd (you have to be if you want to study physics for 4 years) but I appreciate that not everyone is. If physics isn’t your thing and you just want to get the grades then don’t worry. I’m the guy for you. I can give an abridged this-is-everything-you-need-to-know guide to Physics or Maths at any level that’ll help you pass the exam. I’ve also got great tips on revision and exam technique (how to set out work, maximise time in the exam etc.). If, however, you’re interested in physics and maths and are looking to study further or maybe make a mark on the scientific world yourself, I can give a broader, more in depth approach to the subject that won’t just get you acing the exam, it’ll help you write a great personal statement, answer technical questions in interview and get you thinking the right way about physics.

Hi, I'm Jack, I’m an Oxford graduate (first class masters (MPhys) Sept 2018) with lots of experience tutoring and teaching. I studied Physics, Maths, Further Maths, Chemistry and an Extended Project at A-level achieving top marks across the board as well as passing the Physics Aptitude Test and the Oxford admissions interviews. That's not to say that I found all of that easy or stress free (believe me I didn’t!) so I’d like to pass on my knowledge to students so that I can help them understand the subject, feel confident going into exams and ultimately achieve the grades they deserve. Of course I’m a massive nerd (you have to be if you want to study physics for 4 years) but I appreciate that not everyone is. If physics isn’t your thing and you just want to get the grades then don’t worry. I’m the guy for you. I can give an abridged this-is-everything-you-need-to-know guide to Physics or Maths at any level that’ll help you pass the exam. I’ve also got great tips on revision and exam technique (how to set out work, maximise time in the exam etc.). If, however, you’re interested in physics and maths and are looking to study further or maybe make a mark on the scientific world yourself, I can give a broader, more in depth approach to the subject that won’t just get you acing the exam, it’ll help you write a great personal statement, answer technical questions in interview and get you thinking the right way about physics.

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About my sessions

My approach to teaching is very informal. I don’t believe in lecturing students but rather having a chat about what it all really means. I like to encourage my students to ask me questions and in return I ask a lot of questions but there are no silly answers or obvious questions. I go slowly and start from the basics so if there’s anything that’s unclear we’ll sort it out. Equally though, if a student knows what they’re talking about this becomes apparent very quickly and I’m not going to waste anyone’s time teaching things that are already well understood. I like to go through questions mostly from past papers or course books that are written by the exam board. Once I’ve gone through a question, I like to test whether the student has really got it by tweaking the question or asking something related but slightly different (nobody’s going to trick me into doing their homework). When I first meet with a student, I like to make a list of key areas that they’re finding particularly challenging then I can write a plan of how we’d go about fixing any issues they’re having. It’s no use teaching rocket science before first knowing Newton’s laws. I am familiar with OCR, OCR MEI and Edexcel courses in A-level maths and physics and I did the Edexcel IGCSE course in maths and the sciences. However, I am confident I could teach any Maths or Physics GCSE or A-level syllabus.

My approach to teaching is very informal. I don’t believe in lecturing students but rather having a chat about what it all really means. I like to encourage my students to ask me questions and in return I ask a lot of questions but there are no silly answers or obvious questions. I go slowly and start from the basics so if there’s anything that’s unclear we’ll sort it out. Equally though, if a student knows what they’re talking about this becomes apparent very quickly and I’m not going to waste anyone’s time teaching things that are already well understood. I like to go through questions mostly from past papers or course books that are written by the exam board. Once I’ve gone through a question, I like to test whether the student has really got it by tweaking the question or asking something related but slightly different (nobody’s going to trick me into doing their homework). When I first meet with a student, I like to make a list of key areas that they’re finding particularly challenging then I can write a plan of how we’d go about fixing any issues they’re having. It’s no use teaching rocket science before first knowing Newton’s laws. I am familiar with OCR, OCR MEI and Edexcel courses in A-level maths and physics and I did the Edexcel IGCSE course in maths and the sciences. However, I am confident I could teach any Maths or Physics GCSE or A-level syllabus.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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4 Oct, 2018

Ratings & Reviews

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Lorna Parent from Milano

25 Jan

Jack is an outstanding tutor! My son has already made progress and gained confidence after just 4 lessons. Jack has a positive and fun approach and I highly recommend him!

SR
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Samuel Student

19 Jan

Really knowledgeable and personable. Has a great balance that allows student to really learn

AJ
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Aditya Student

13 Jan

Methodical approach and nice positive attitude left a good first impression. Hoping for many more tutorials!

CW
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Camilla Parent from Berlin

12 Nov, 2018

Great work, very glad to have Jack supporting our daughter.

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
PhysicsA-level (A2)A*
MathsA-level (A2)A*
Further MathematicsA-level (A2)A*
ChemistryA-level (A2)A*
.PAT.Uni admission testPASS

General Availability

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12 - 5pm
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Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
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Tue
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Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrice
MathsA Level£40 /hr
PhysicsA Level£40 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£40 /hr
MathsGCSE£40 /hr
PhysicsGCSE£40 /hr
Maths13 Plus£40 /hr
Oxbridge PreparationMentoring£40 /hr
MATUniversity£40 /hr
PATUniversity£40 /hr
PhysicsUniversity£40 /hr

Questions Jack has answered

A car of mass m is travelling at a speed v around a circular track of radius r banked at an angle θ. (a) What is the centripetal acceleration of the car? (b) What is the normal force acting on the car? (c) If θ = 45°, r = 1 km what is the maximum speed?

(a) The formula for the centripetal acceleration of an object undergoing circular motion at a radius r and speed v is a = v^2/r so as F = ma the centripetal force is F = mv^2/r. [2 marks](b) By drawing a diagram, labelling the forces including weight (W = mg) and the normal force (N) and knowing that these forces must add to the centripetal force (F = mv^2/r) horizontally and must cancel vertically (as the car is not accelerating vertically there can be no net force) we can first show that the weight must balance the vertical component of N. So N cosθ = mg therefore N = mg/ cosθ. [6 marks](c) By balancing the horizontal component of the normal force N sinθ and the centripetal force F = mv^2/r we can show that N sinθ = mv^2/r as N = mg/ cosθ then mg tanθ = mv^2/r cancelling the masses on both sides of the equation we show that v^2 = g r tanθ so the maximum speed is v =  (g r tanθ) as g = 10 m/s^2, r = 1 km = 1000 m and tan45° = 1. The maximum speed v = √ (1000 × 10 × 1) = √ 10000 = 100 m/s. [6 marks]If the car went any faster than 100 m/s the horizontal component of the normal force would not be large enough to keep the car travelling in circular motion so the car would come off the track unless another force besides the normal force was present. One force that can do this is the friction between the tyres and the track which we have neglected.(a) The formula for the centripetal acceleration of an object undergoing circular motion at a radius r and speed v is a = v^2/r so as F = ma the centripetal force is F = mv^2/r. [2 marks](b) By drawing a diagram, labelling the forces including weight (W = mg) and the normal force (N) and knowing that these forces must add to the centripetal force (F = mv^2/r) horizontally and must cancel vertically (as the car is not accelerating vertically there can be no net force) we can first show that the weight must balance the vertical component of N. So N cosθ = mg therefore N = mg/ cosθ. [6 marks](c) By balancing the horizontal component of the normal force N sinθ and the centripetal force F = mv^2/r we can show that N sinθ = mv^2/r as N = mg/ cosθ then mg tanθ = mv^2/r cancelling the masses on both sides of the equation we show that v^2 = g r tanθ so the maximum speed is v =  (g r tanθ) as g = 10 m/s^2, r = 1 km = 1000 m and tan45° = 1. The maximum speed v = √ (1000 × 10 × 1) = √ 10000 = 100 m/s. [6 marks]If the car went any faster than 100 m/s the horizontal component of the normal force would not be large enough to keep the car travelling in circular motion so the car would come off the track unless another force besides the normal force was present. One force that can do this is the friction between the tyres and the track which we have neglected.

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6 months ago

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