Lois C. Uni Admissions Test .UKCAT. tutor, Uni Admissions Test -Medic...

Lois C.

Currently unavailable: no new students

Degree: Medicine (Bachelors) - St. George's University

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About me

I’m Lois and I’m a medical student at St George’s. I have experience of tutoring my peers at university and students at secondary school. I have also taught foreign children English, and I love to share my passion and enthusiasm about what I teach.

Biology and Chemistry tuition

I love biology and chemistry, but I remember that I sometimes didn’t feel that way when I was studying for my GCSEs and A Levels!  I hope that you find these tutorials fun and engaging which will enable you to deepen your understanding and really excel.  We will work together to build your confidence as this can be very difficult to do in a large class but is essential for exams.

I will be guided by you and tailor each session to focus on your specific needs, whether that is perfecting exam technique, getting to grips with an especially challenging concept or going through the syllabus to ensure that you have a thorough understanding of everything you need to know. I can work with you to identify how you learn best and develop techniques that you can also use in your personal revision.  

Medical School Applications

I know how stressful and overwhelming applying to medical school can be and I would love to work with you to make the whole process less daunting. I can help with all areas of your application, including writing a personal statement, preparing for the UKCAT and interviews.

I think I can offer a really useful perspective on the whole process as I’ve been through it twice so I’m familiar with where people tend to slip up and, more importantly, how to correct it!

What next?

Please drop me a webmail or organise a ‘meet the tutor session’ so I can get to know you! For science tuition, let me know which level and exam board you are on and if there are any particular topics you need help with.

If you’re applying to medical school, tell me which part you would like help with and if you have any idea of the universities you want to apply to.

I look forward to hearing from you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Biology A Level £20 /hr
Chemistry A Level £20 /hr
Biology GCSE £18 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £18 /hr
-Medical School Preparation- Mentoring £20 /hr
.UKCAT. Uni Admissions Test £25 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
BiologyA-LevelA
Chemistry A-LevelA
English literature A-LevelA
UKCATUni Admissions Test2830
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

31/08/2014

Currently unavailable: no new students

Questions Lois has answered

how is urine produced in the kidney?

The first step of urine formation is ultrafiltration. Blood passes through a network of capillaries in the kidney called the glomerulus. It is filtered into the Bowman’s capsule (the first part of the nephron) through a fine membrane which acts like a sieve. Blood cells and proteins are too bi...

The first step of urine formation is ultrafiltration. Blood passes through a network of capillaries in the kidney called the glomerulus. It is filtered into the Bowman’s capsule (the first part of the nephron) through a fine membrane which acts like a sieve. Blood cells and proteins are too big to pass through the membrane so they remain in the blood, but everything else – water, ions, waste produce (urea) and glucose passes into the nephron. The solution entering the nephron is called the ultrafiltrate.

The next step is selective reabsorption. It is important that waste products (urea) are excreted from the body in urine while substances your body needs – ions, water and glucose – remain in the blood so they can be used. To achieve this, most ions and all glucose is pumped back into the blood from the nephron. This mostly happens in the first part of the nephron, the proximal convoluted tubule. Everything that is not pumped back into the blood moves into the bladder down the ureters as urine and is excreted.

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1 year ago

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