Maddy W. GCSE English Language tutor, GCSE English Literature tutor, ...

Maddy W.

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Degree: History (Bachelors) - Bristol University

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About me

Hello! My name is Maddy and I'm in my final year studying history at Bristol University. The arts have always been my strong point - particularly English, French and History which I studied at A level. Therefore, I feel confident in offering supportive and engaging sessions in all three of these subjects to students at GCSE level.

Having had a tutor myself for my GCSEs, I understand how valuable these tutoring sessions can be in consolidating knowledge and boosting confidence, particularly when they can be tailored to focus on the student's specific needs.

For historyessay structure is crucial to achieving high grades, as well as formulating arguments and criticial analysis. I have knowledge in an array of historical topics offered in the GCSE syllabus, having studied a broad spectrum of history at school, college and university so far. My sessions will address these skills and the best ways of applying them in the exam.

Similarly, for English, I have some experience in tutoring literature at GCSE Level, helping students at an underachieving school to achieve the top grades they are capable of. This involved exploration of the novel's contextual background, character analysis and essay plans - all of which are crucial in impressing the examiners. 

I also offer sessions in French, supporting the student's grasp of structures, tenses and grammar, or anything other aspects of the language that they might need help with. Listening, reading and writing can all be looked at in these sessions for effective exam preparation.  

Feel free to contact me for any more information or to book a Meet the Tutor session. I really look forward to hearing from you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
English Language GCSE £18 /hr
English Literature GCSE £18 /hr
French GCSE £18 /hr
History GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
HISTORYA-LevelA
ENGLISH LANGUAGEA-LevelA
ENGLISH LITERATUREA-LevelA
FRENCHA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: no new students

Questions Maddy has answered

Why was internment introduced in Northern Ireland in 1971? And what were the consequences?

In 1969, the nationalist IRA had split in two, and a separate paramilitary group was formed. They fought against the unionists and campaigned to remove Northern Ireland from the UK. There was increasing violence of IRA campaigns in early 1971, with a particularly marked increase in intensit...

In 1969, the nationalist IRA had split in two, and a separate paramilitary group was formed. They fought against the unionists and campaigned to remove Northern Ireland from the UK.

There was increasing violence of IRA campaigns in early 1971, with a particularly marked increase in intensity between July and August. The included campaigns of murder and intimidation, with many members of the public and security forces killed. They refused to cooperate with the government

British prime-minister Brian Faulkner was under increasing pressure from his own party to introduce internment to deal with those people in Northern Ireland believed to be terrorists. He felt that they were creating deeper divisions and antagonism within Northern Ireland and threatening both its economic and social survival. He decided that ordinary laws could not deal sufficiently with such terrorists.

Thus internment was imposed: there were mass arrests on 9th August 1971, when 342 men were arrested, and many were moved to holding centres and then to detention centres where they were often subject to physical ill-treatment.

Internment: (arrest and detention, often without trial) was imposed in order to reduce violence, yet arguably ended up having the opposite effect:

Effects:

Violence levels increased, many homes and businesses were destroyed

Unionist support for the policy began to decline

IRA and other nationalist groups gained support as a result of internment

It enabled the IRA to organise, bringing them together inside internment camps and creating a new organizational identity which the movement had previously lacked

The British Government was mistrusted and Faulkner was criticized - perceived as a monster.

One major criticism of internment was that many who were interned were not active republican paramilitaries.  British aggressive interrogation tactics were also criticised – allegations of methods of torture used during internment

Mass anti-internment protest arranged: became known as Bloody Sunday – 30th January 1972 - when the British army opened fire on the crowds of protestors.

Failure of internment eventually led to imposition of Direct Rule in Northern Ireland in March 1972 by Heath’s British government, when they declared their intention to end internment. However, they still proceeded with caution… 

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1 year ago

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