Victoria C.

Victoria C.

£30 /hr

Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry (Integrated Masters) - Brasenose College, Oxford University

5.0
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18 reviews

Trusted by schools

This tutor is also part of our Schools Programme. They are trusted by teachers to deliver high-quality 1:1 tuition that complements the school curriculum.

63 completed lessons

About me

I am a recent Biochemistry graduate from Oxford (First Class). I am passionate about my subject; in particular about immunology, genetics and cell biology. I enjoy teaching and have a lot of experience tutoring sixth-form and GCSE students in Biology and Chemistry, particularly with AQA and Edexcel exam boards. Whilst at university I was the Access and Admissions rep for my college and so I also have experience helping students prepare for Oxbridge applications (mainly personal statement and interview preparation). I am friendly and dedicated and will try to make the sessions engaging and specific to each student's learning style.

I am a recent Biochemistry graduate from Oxford (First Class). I am passionate about my subject; in particular about immunology, genetics and cell biology. I enjoy teaching and have a lot of experience tutoring sixth-form and GCSE students in Biology and Chemistry, particularly with AQA and Edexcel exam boards. Whilst at university I was the Access and Admissions rep for my college and so I also have experience helping students prepare for Oxbridge applications (mainly personal statement and interview preparation). I am friendly and dedicated and will try to make the sessions engaging and specific to each student's learning style.

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About my sessions

During the introductory meetings I will strive to determine each student's learning styles and what motivates and interests them in their studies. This will allow me to prepare lessons that are more specific and personalised to each individual and what they want to get out of the sessions. I believe the most important aspect in encouraging learning is to make sessions fun and engaging which I will strive to do. To monitor progress I will always allow time for students to ask me questions and to reflect on the last lesson to ensure difficult topics are covered enough before moving on to something new.

During the introductory meetings I will strive to determine each student's learning styles and what motivates and interests them in their studies. This will allow me to prepare lessons that are more specific and personalised to each individual and what they want to get out of the sessions. I believe the most important aspect in encouraging learning is to make sessions fun and engaging which I will strive to do. To monitor progress I will always allow time for students to ask me questions and to reflect on the last lesson to ensure difficult topics are covered enough before moving on to something new.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Enhanced DBS Check

08/03/2016

Ratings & Reviews

5
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18 customer reviews
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SG
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Sophie Parent from London Lesson review 26 Nov, 18:45

26 Nov

Really great!

EW
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Emily Parent from Marlow

4 Nov

Brilliant for my son, he’s felt engaged, challenged and much more confident. Many thanks.

SG
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Sophie Parent from London Lesson review 10 Dec, 18:45

10 Dec

CK
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Carl Parent from Loughborough Lesson review 10 Dec, 17:30

10 Dec

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
MathsA-level (A2)A*
ChemistryA-level (A2)A*
BiologyA-level (A2)A*
PsychologyA-level (AS)A
AnthropologyA-level (AS)A
Critical thinkingA-level (AS)A

General Availability

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Pre 12pm
12 - 5pm
After 5pm

Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
BiologyA Level£30 /hr
ChemistryA Level£30 /hr
BiologyGCSE£30 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£30 /hr
Human BiologyGCSE£30 /hr
MathsGCSE£30 /hr
ScienceGCSE£30 /hr
Oxbridge PreparationMentoring£30 /hr
Personal StatementsMentoring£30 /hr

Questions Victoria has answered

How are T cells activated during the immune response?

The immune response to infection is split into the innate and the adaptive phases. During the innate phase immune cells called phagocytes (which include neutrophils and macrophage cells) ingest pathogens. They then travel to the lymph nodes and display the digested pathogen molecules (called antigens) on their cell surface membranes. T cells in the lymph nodes which have receptors specific to the antigens are activated and these T cells then multiply. The activated T cells are specific to the antigens of the infecting pathogen. The T cells circulate in the body and function during the adaptive phase of the immune response.The immune response to infection is split into the innate and the adaptive phases. During the innate phase immune cells called phagocytes (which include neutrophils and macrophage cells) ingest pathogens. They then travel to the lymph nodes and display the digested pathogen molecules (called antigens) on their cell surface membranes. T cells in the lymph nodes which have receptors specific to the antigens are activated and these T cells then multiply. The activated T cells are specific to the antigens of the infecting pathogen. The T cells circulate in the body and function during the adaptive phase of the immune response.

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3 months ago

67 views

What do activated T cells do during the adaptive immune response?

Activated T cells have receptors that are specific to the antigens of the infecting pathogen (eg a virus), which means that they perform their functions when bound to these antigens. There are two main types of T cell; the cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and the T helper cells (Th1 and Th2 cells).CTLs kill infected cells when their T cell receptors (TCRs) are bound to the antigens. For example, if one of your cells is infected with a virus, it will present the virus antigens on receptors on its cell surface to bind to the CTL's TCRs. This causes the CTL to kill the infected cell by releasing harmful chemicals and perforins into it.T helper cells have different functions to CTLs. When a specialised antigen presentation cell (such as a macrophage or B cell) ingests extracellular antigens, they present the antigen on their cell surfaces to bind to the T helper cells' TCRs. The T helper cells then release chemicals which aid the immune response. For example Th1 cells secrete chemicals which enhance the CTL killing function and Th2 cells secrete chemicals which help B cells proliferate and produce antibodies.Activated T cells have receptors that are specific to the antigens of the infecting pathogen (eg a virus), which means that they perform their functions when bound to these antigens. There are two main types of T cell; the cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and the T helper cells (Th1 and Th2 cells).CTLs kill infected cells when their T cell receptors (TCRs) are bound to the antigens. For example, if one of your cells is infected with a virus, it will present the virus antigens on receptors on its cell surface to bind to the CTL's TCRs. This causes the CTL to kill the infected cell by releasing harmful chemicals and perforins into it.T helper cells have different functions to CTLs. When a specialised antigen presentation cell (such as a macrophage or B cell) ingests extracellular antigens, they present the antigen on their cell surfaces to bind to the T helper cells' TCRs. The T helper cells then release chemicals which aid the immune response. For example Th1 cells secrete chemicals which enhance the CTL killing function and Th2 cells secrete chemicals which help B cells proliferate and produce antibodies.

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3 months ago

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