Alex W. Mentoring -Medical School Preparation- tutor, Mentoring -Pers...

Alex W.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Medicine (Bachelors) - Bristol University

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About me

About Me:

I'm Alex and I'm a 4th year medical student at Bristol University.

I live in Cornwall when not at university and spend far too much time at the beach. I managed to get 42 points in my International Baccalaureate with highers in English, Chemistry and Biology. I worked for three years as an RNLI Beach Lifeguard and want to pursue a career in Emergency and Pre-hospital Medicine.

Tutoring

I am currently tutoring in GCSE Biology, Chemistry and Maths. I like to make sessions that are guided by you and focus on understanding concepts. Just let me know what you're struggling with before the session and we can work through it together. It's also really helpful if you make me aware of what board you are sitting and I can make sure the session is right for you. I'm happy to help guide you through doing exam questions. I like to keep things informal and we can always cover extra little things, don't be afraid to ask questions.

At the end of the session I think it's really important to summarise what we've done and try and come up with some things to work on in the next session if it's needed.

Applying for Medical School

I remember the pain of medical school applications well, but got my first choice, first time. I want to help you acheive your goals too. I'm here to try and help you get through with as little stress as possible. 

I have experience guiding year 11 applications to medical school, working on personal statements and talking through trying to get work experience. I have also got lots of experience of teaching lifesaving and surfing on the beaches at home.

I'm very friendly and approachable and want to make sessions that are informal and give practical advice on strengthening your application. I'm also happy to discuss life at medical school. I love it!

What do I do now?

Just send me a "web mail" or sign up for a FREE "meet the tutor" session, and I will be very happy to answer any questions you might have.

I'm looking forward to meeting you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Biology GCSE £18 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
-Medical School Preparation- Mentoring £20 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr
.UKCAT. Uni Admissions Test £25 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
Chemistry HLBaccalaureate7
Biology HLBaccalaureate6
English HLBaccalaureate6
Maths SLBaccalaureate7
French SLBaccalaureate7
History SLBaccalaureate7
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

01/08/2014

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Questions Alex has answered

What is the difference between aerobic respiration and anaerobic respiration?

Respiration is the process by which the body creates energy by breaking down nutrients. This can either happen in the presence of oxygen, or without it. The key difference between the two processes are that aerobic respiration requires oxygen and anaerobic respiration does not.   However th...

Respiration is the process by which the body creates energy by breaking down nutrients. This can either happen in the presence of oxygen, or without it. The key difference between the two processes are that aerobic respiration requires oxygen and anaerobic respiration does not.


 

However there are more differences between the two processes.

Aerobic respiration creates relatively larger amounts of energy by breaking down sugars in the presence of oxygen creating water and carbon dioxide as products. This process is occurring constantly in plants and animals, and occurs in the mitochondria of you and I.

glucose + oxygen -> carbon dioxide + water

C6H12O6 + 6O2 → 6CO2 + 6H2O

Anaerobic respiration creates relatively smaller amounts of energy, but does not need oxygen. The same thing is broken down - glucose - but a different waste product - lactic acid - is made. In exercise when we can’t get enough oxygen to our muscles anaerobic respiration occurs and lactic acid is produced. Glucose is used less efficiently and not completely broken down so less energy is made. Furthermore the lactic acid needs to be oxidised to water and carbon dioxide later and needs oxygen to do this, so you are effectively “borrowing energy” that you will need oxygen for later on - this is referred to as the oxygen debt. Oxygen debt explains why you continue to breathe heavily after having stopped exercise.

glucose -> lactic acid

C6H12O6 → 2C3H6O3

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1 year ago

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Which medical school should I apply to?

Deciding on where to apply is really important; hopefully you are going to be there for at least five years! When trying to decide there are a few important things to look for. However, it is also worth noting that all medical schools have to follow the GMC's "Tomorrow's Doctors" and ALL will ...

Deciding on where to apply is really important; hopefully you are going to be there for at least five years! When trying to decide there are a few important things to look for. However, it is also worth noting that all medical schools have to follow the GMC's "Tomorrow's Doctors" and ALL will meet the standard to become a future doctor.

Admissions Policy:

It is worth looking at what weighting each school gives to parts of your application. If your UKCAT score wasn't great but you've got really strong GCSE's then apply to medical schools that put less weighting on the UKCAT. Make sure that your GCSE and A Level's will meet the basic requirements of the programme you're applying for. A surprising number of applications will miss this and that means instant rejection. If the UKCAT didn't go well then question if the BMAT is worth doing? 

Course Style:

Are you looking forward to a traditional lecture theatre and a good scientific grounding, or are you a more individual and self-driven learner? It is important to figure out how you learn best and apply to schools that will meet this requirement. More and more medical schools are putting clinical "experiences" in the first two years but if you're desperate to get into the clinical setting then apply with this focus. Are you desperate to dissect? Many do full cadaveric dissection, but you might also find that you learn just as easily with prosection. Make sure that you are aware of opportunities to intercalate.

A New Home:

Five years in a new place is a long time, and like it or not your university town becomes a new home. It is important to consider how easily you can get back to your family and friends. Look at how easy the transport is, could you pop home for a weekend? You should also account for living five years in a new place. Some cities are more expensive than others, how much can you afford to spend on accomodation and living? Look at if the university is a city or a campus, each will have a unique flavour and it's important to feel happy in your surroundings. 

Write a list of universities that you feel might be for you and then go to a few open days. You can really get a feel for somewhere by visiting and you also get the chance to ask some important questions about the universities and meet some other aspiring medics as well as current ones. 

Wherever you end up training, most tend to really enjoy their five years and a lot of people will continue living in the same area. It's worth saying that despite differences in location and learning style everyone will come out with a Bachelors in Medicine and Surgery and be ready to walk into the medical world.

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1 year ago

348 views
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