Constance M. A Level French tutor, GCSE French tutor, 13 plus  French...

Constance M.

Currently unavailable: for new students

Degree: French & Spanish (Bachelors) - Bristol University

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About me

Education: 

Graduated from the University of Bristol in July 2015, with a first class degree in French & Spanish. 

Completed my secondary education in France (French Baccalaureate), but familiar with the British system of A-levels through the English side of my family and friends. 

About myself: 

A native bilingual French and English speaker. I'm very enthusiastic about languages and think they are extremely important for communication, open-mindedness and so much more! I'm therefore keen to help anyone who needs it develop the same passion, which comes partly through grasping a foreign language. 

Tutoring experience and approach:

As a native French speaker, friends and classmates often turned to me for help and tips about grammar, vocabulary, cultural references and more, which has unofficially trained me to explain things in a clear manner. 

I would approach tutorials in an informal manner, asking the student to choose what they want to work on and working in a way that suits each individual, rather than simply applying the same framework for everyone. 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
French A Level £20 /hr
French GCSE £18 /hr
French 13 Plus £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
French & SpanishBachelors Degree1st class
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for new students

Ratings and reviews

4from 1 customer review

Rory (Student) December 14 2015

great

Questions Constance has answered

Passé composé: how does the agreement of the past participle work?

The passé composé (present perfect) is a frequently used tense to refer to a finished action, event, etc. in the near past. In spoken French, it often replaces the passé simple (past historic).  It is a compound verb form made up of a conjugated auxiliary (être or avoir) and thepast participl...

The passé composé (present perfect) is a frequently used tense to refer to a finished action, event, etc. in the near past. In spoken French, it often replaces the passé simple (past historic). 

It is a compound verb form made up of a conjugated auxiliary (être or avoir) and the past participle of the verb.

Example: Hier, je suis allé à l'école. [first person singular of "être" + past participle of "aller"]. 

The rules of the past participle's agreement vary. The basic ones are as follows: 

With être, the past participle agrees with the subject of the verb.

Examples:

Elles sont parties à Paris. 

Pierre est tombé à vélo. 

With avoir, the past participle agrees with the direct object only if it comes before the verb.  

Examples:

Tu as vu la nouvelle moto de Romain? Il l'a achetée hier. ["la nouvelle moto de Romain" is the direct object; in the first sentence, it is after the verb, no agreement; in the second sentence, the personal pronoun " l' " is the direct object, replacing "la nouvelle moto de Romain"; the past participle "acheté" therefore agrees with it.]

However, the rules change when the verb is reflexive (always used with être). 

When the subject of the verb is also the subject of the action, the past participle agrees with the subject.

Example:

Ils se sont lavés. = They washed themselves.

[Who/what is being washed? --> "Ils". The subject is therefore the recipient of the action, there is agreement.]

When there is a direct object that is the recipient of the action, then the agreement rules are the same as with avoir: the past participle agrees with the direct object if it is placed before the verb, and doesn't agree if it is placed after it.

Example:

Ils se sont lavé les mains. = They washed their hands.

[Who/what is being washed? --> "les mains". "Les mains" is the direct object and is placed after the verb, no agreement.]

Les mains qu'ils se sont lavées. = The hands that they washed.

[Who/what is being washed? --> "les mains". It is the direct object and is placed before the verb, so the past participle agrees with it.]

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1 year ago

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