Maria Mariana  A. GCSE Music tutor, A Level Music tutor, IB Music tutor

Maria Mariana A.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Music (Bachelors) - Durham University

MyTutor guarantee

Contact Maria Mariana
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Maria Mariana

About me

About Me:

Hi, I’m Mariana! I’m a third year music student at Durham and I’m expecting to graduate with a First Class Honours. I am very patient and sociable. I am very passionate about music and would love to provide support to any GCSE, A Level or IB music students in any way I can! Music is my life and I would love the opportunity to be able to help students with a subject I love.

I have previous experience as a tutor; I have tutored MYP Maths and IB Math Studies SL. Therefore, I am comfortable in giving advice, answering questions and adapting my methods to the needs of the student. I am 100% dedicated to the development of the student’s skills.

The Sessions

You will choose what we cover in each lesson. You will let me know a few days in advance what you would like for us to go through, and I will prepare a thorough tutorial on what you wish to study.

Examples will be a major part of the tutorials. I will always provide the best examples (including score if necessary), so that the student will always be listening to music and associating what they are learning to what they are listening. I am sure this will make the sessions engaging and fun!

IB… HELP?!

The IB is super tough, so I would also be happy to help with any other IB-related queries, as I know exactly how demanding the whole experience can be. So, feel free to ask me anything!

Hope to see you soon!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Music A Level £20 /hr
Music GCSE £18 /hr
Music IB £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
English A Language and LiteratureBaccalaureate6
Geography HLBaccalaureate6
Portuguese B HLBaccalaureate7
Physics SLBaccalaureate6
Music SLBaccalaureate6
Math Studies SLBaccalaureate7
Theory of KnowledgeBaccalaureateB
Extended EssayBaccalaureateA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Questions Maria Mariana has answered

How do we prepare for the questions about the set pieces in our exam?

The best thing you can do is to get to know the main ideas of both set pieces and predict the questions you might get asked. Ask yourself: why did the IB choose these pieces? What do they want me to say about these pieces? Your teacher will most likely provide these answers for you. Take all t...

The best thing you can do is to get to know the main ideas of both set pieces and predict the questions you might get asked. Ask yourself: why did the IB choose these pieces? What do they want me to say about these pieces? Your teacher will most likely provide these answers for you. Take all the concepts, everything your teacher has provided, anything (credible) you have found online, and write practice essays on each possible point. When you get to the exam, you will probably have done at least one of the questions during your revision. This applies to any IB subject.

Also, you need to get as familiar as possible with your set pieces. This might seem obvious, but if it is done well, you can ace this section of the exam. I suggest listening to them LOADS and get so familiar with the score, that in the exam you can remember exactly where/when things occur, without hearing the music physically. Some people can hear the music in their head instantly without having heard the piece before, which is pretty cool. However, some people can’t and that is completely okay. Just listen to the pieces; learn to love, or at least appreciate them. The examiners will be able to see this in your answer, which is a plus.

I would happily help you get comfortable with these pieces and will aim to answer all of your questions. This section of the exam is the one you can prepare for the most, so let’s make sure you get those marks!

see more

1 year ago

266 views

What is a da capo aria?

The da capo aria is a vocal form used primarily in the Baroque Era. It is in ternary form (ABA’). The A section is in the tonic key, and the B section is often in a minor key with the mood frequently being more reflective. In the repeat of the A section (A’), the singer would demonstrate their...

The da capo aria is a vocal form used primarily in the Baroque Era. It is in ternary form (ABA’). The A section is in the tonic key, and the B section is often in a minor key with the mood frequently being more reflective. In the repeat of the A section (A’), the singer would demonstrate their vocal virtuosity by improvising and ornamenting the melodic line; the singer would add trills, acciaccaturas, mordents, appoggiaturas, runs, and jumps all to show off their skill as a singer. In the end of the repeated section, it was customary to add a cadenza.

The sheet music would only include the A section and the B section, with a “Da Capo” or “D. C.” in the end, signaling the singer to go back to the A section and improvise. Sometimes, the composer would realize (write out) the ornamented A section, for example “Rejoice greatly” from Handel’s Messiah, but this is rare.

The da capo aria fell out of fashion in the classical era because the focus shifted from the virtuosity of the performer to the beauty of the music. Singers would perform what was written, with ornaments being specified by the composer and not chosen by the singer.

Examples:

“Rejoice greatly” from Handel’s Messiah

“Da tempeste” from Handel’s Giulio Cesare in Egitto

“Lascia ch’io pianga” from Handel’s Rinaldo

“Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen” from the cantata by Bach

see more

1 year ago

497 views

What is the best approach to analysing an extract?

A listening exam is daunting. There is not a lot of time to analyse an extract, so you need to find the quickest and most efficient way to gain marks. There are many different ways to approach an extract, and you have to find a way that best suits you. I believe the first thing you need to do ...

A listening exam is daunting. There is not a lot of time to analyse an extract, so you need to find the quickest and most efficient way to gain marks. There are many different ways to approach an extract, and you have to find a way that best suits you. I believe the first thing you need to do is pick up on clues as to which musical period the extract belongs to. By doing this, you are already searching for the features the examiners are looking for: context, instrumentation, texture, harmony, melody, function, etc. 

Instead of starting from scratch, you use all you know about each musical period to aid in your analysis. Ask yourself: what is characteristic of that period? For example, let’s look at the first movement of Mozart’s Symphony no. 29 in A major.

Examples of what you can say (not a complete analysis):

Structure

Tempo: Allegro moderato

=> could be the first movement of a symphony

=> so it could be in sonata form 

       -> mention exposition, first subject (tonic), transition (modulation), second subject (subordinate key: usually dominant, could be subdominant, relative major if in the minor key (but irrelevant as it is clearly in a major key))

Harmony: Functional, diatonic

=> Essential for music of the classical era: the musical tension created by the modulation from the tonic to the dominant, and the need to relieve this tension by a return of the tonic

=> clear identifiable cadences (identify the cadences)

Melody

=> clear cut phrases

=> musical focus is on the melody (characteristic of the classical style)

Texture:

What is expected in a classical piece: homophony (melody with accompaniment)

=> starts out homophonic with chorale like accompaniment in the rest of the strings

=> SALIENT: moves to polyphonic/fugato texture. Texture shift could signify a structural shift: first subject to transition.

Context:

=> court music

=> classical period = rise in instrumental music

         -> the emergence and popularity of the symphony

I used important features of the classical era to help me in my analysis. This is particularly useful if you get stuck in the middle of your analysis. If you do this for every musical era, you will always find something to say. 

see more

1 year ago

352 views
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Maria Mariana

Still comparing tutors?

How do we connect with a tutor?

Where are they based?

How much does tuition cost?

How do tutorials work?

Cookies:

We use cookies to improve our service. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok