Amna  A. 13 plus  Physics tutor, 13 plus  Biology tutor, A Level Math...

Amna A.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Biomedical Engineering (Masters) - Imperial College London University

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About me

Hi, I'm Amna and I study Biomedical Engineering at Imperial College London. In my course, we cover stuff from all areas in Maths, Physics, Chemistry and Biology! I have studied science since GCSE at which I got 9A*'s and I managed to get 4 A*'s at A level as well. So I assure you that you are in good hands. 

MOVING ON from the boring stuff:

 Essentially I love Science - and I want to share my enthusiasm and passion in the field with you so that you can not only get stellar grades but also have a fantastic time whilst doing it! When I study myself, I really like to manuevre through the clutter and break concepts down to the very basics. I use a lot of diagrams, illustrations and labels to make things flow logically without losing important details. I intend to use these tactics along with frequent question and answer sessions to make sure that you understand each and every single thing and you have a good base! 

I like to think that I am easy to approach and talk to. I am here for you throughout the entire learning process, it is not just your journey - it is ours. So feel free to ask me as many questions, no matter how silly they are, at any point because my utmost priority is to make sure that you are comfortable and happy with what you are learning!  I have coached various junior debate and sport teams, and tutored other friends quite a bit when I was in school - so I have a fair amount of experience as well. 

I am really excited to work with you :) 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Biology A Level £22 /hr
Maths A Level £22 /hr
Physics A Level £22 /hr
Maths 13 Plus £20 /hr
Science 13 Plus £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathematicsA-LevelA*
PhysicsA-LevelA*
Chemistry A-LevelA*
Biology A-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Ratings and reviews

4from 2 customer reviews

Tyrese (Student) October 10 2015

Enjoyable. took time to explain and made sure I got it

Philipsia (Parent) October 10 2015

Tyrese really enjoyed the session and was very happy with the delivery.

Questions Amna has answered

Why is our genetic code degenerate?

To answer this question, it is first important to understand the meaning of the word degenerate. So being an A level Biology student, you must know that genes code for amino acids. (these are the basic components of protiens) Now, each amino acid is coded for by a triad sequence of bases , na...

To answer this question, it is first important to understand the meaning of the word degenerate.

So being an A level Biology student, you must know that genes code for amino acids. (these are the basic components of protiens)

Now, each amino acid is coded for by a triad sequence of bases , namely Adenine, Cystine, Thyamine and Guanine (Thyamine is replaced by Uracil in RNA, if we are referring to codons instead of anticodons). These bases are referred to by the capitalised form of their first letter i.e. A,C,T,G,U. Hence, an amino acid is coded for by an codon with the sequence: AUG, or GUA, or GGA (Any combination really of A,G,C,U) 

There are 20 amino acids that need to be coded for in humans. Therefore there should be 20 sets of triplet sequences, however because of simple maths ( that I will show shortly) , there are actually 64 combinations/triad codes available which means that some amino acids have a repetitive code i.e. the code is degenerate. For example, the amino acid Cystiene is coded for by the codons UGU AND UGC. Some amino acids have up to six combinations for just themselves.

So here is the maths: 

We have four bases available: A , G , C and U 

And we have to code for 20 Amino acids. 

If each Amino acid was coded for by 2 bases, we would only have 16 possible combinations, which is four short of how many we need: 4 x 4 = 16

_ _ 

(Four options in the first blank, four options in the second blank as the code can be repeated and be in any arrangement, there fore it is 4 x 4 ) 

Now the next option is to have three bases code for each amino acid : 

_ _ _ 

So four options in the first, four options in the second and four options in the third. Therefore 4 x 4 x 4 or 4which is 64 ! Thats how many we have -which is more than the 20 we need and hence the code is degenerate!

Obviously four bases coding for an amino acid would mean 44 and so on... many many more than we actually need!

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1 year ago

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