Fergus M.

Fergus M.

£24 - £28 /hr

English Language and Literature (Bachelors) - Oxford, Wadham College University

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126 completed lessons

About me

I have just graduated from Oxford with a 1st in English Language and Literature. My degree covered all of English Literature from 650-the present day in extensive detail. This includes coursework on Conrad and Fitzgerald, Shakespeare’s plays, and Woolf and modernist cinema. As this last demonstrates, English can interlink with quite literally every other subject. As a result of this interdisciplinary potential, I have maintained my interest in History and Philosophy, and can confidently teach both to GCSE standard. 


My love of English dates back to when I was doing my own GCSEs. It was then that I realised that English is not about learning set answers from a textbook. Rather, it is a subject of radical self-discovery and self-expression; anyone can read a book or poem and come up with their own unique and entirely brilliant interpretation, far better than anything you will find in any textbook. I remember the pressures of learning for the exam. Having been through it all myself, I will strive to develop every student’s personal areas of interest to make the study of English as enjoyable and personalised as possible. 

I have just graduated from Oxford with a 1st in English Language and Literature. My degree covered all of English Literature from 650-the present day in extensive detail. This includes coursework on Conrad and Fitzgerald, Shakespeare’s plays, and Woolf and modernist cinema. As this last demonstrates, English can interlink with quite literally every other subject. As a result of this interdisciplinary potential, I have maintained my interest in History and Philosophy, and can confidently teach both to GCSE standard. 


My love of English dates back to when I was doing my own GCSEs. It was then that I realised that English is not about learning set answers from a textbook. Rather, it is a subject of radical self-discovery and self-expression; anyone can read a book or poem and come up with their own unique and entirely brilliant interpretation, far better than anything you will find in any textbook. I remember the pressures of learning for the exam. Having been through it all myself, I will strive to develop every student’s personal areas of interest to make the study of English as enjoyable and personalised as possible. 

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About my sessions

Initially, we will identify individual interests, current levels of proficiency, areas of difficulty, and preferred learning techniques. From all this, together we will structure a programme of learning which is customised to the individual student, at a pace and intensity which is just right for you. This could involve compiling and discussing a bank of quotations together, writing or going over paragraphs to prepare for exams, or simply discussing ideas about a text, from which we can gather revision material.


In each tutorial I will go over an unseen passage of poetry or prose. Not only is this an integral component of any English exam, but it will improve your critical faculties and vocabulary, and increase your confidence at deciphering the meanings of a text. Additionally, I will take each student beyond the set-texts into the contextual world of the books or poems being studied. By introducing carefully selected passages from critical, biographical and historical materials and related texts, I will expand the horizons through which we study English. By these means, every lesson we will be pushing to develop a more sophisticated understanding of the set-texts themselves, giving you a broader insight than many other students. This will take very little time and effort, but can yield invaluable results. Progress will be measured by means the close reading, practice exam-style essays, and evaluative conversations.

Initially, we will identify individual interests, current levels of proficiency, areas of difficulty, and preferred learning techniques. From all this, together we will structure a programme of learning which is customised to the individual student, at a pace and intensity which is just right for you. This could involve compiling and discussing a bank of quotations together, writing or going over paragraphs to prepare for exams, or simply discussing ideas about a text, from which we can gather revision material.


In each tutorial I will go over an unseen passage of poetry or prose. Not only is this an integral component of any English exam, but it will improve your critical faculties and vocabulary, and increase your confidence at deciphering the meanings of a text. Additionally, I will take each student beyond the set-texts into the contextual world of the books or poems being studied. By introducing carefully selected passages from critical, biographical and historical materials and related texts, I will expand the horizons through which we study English. By these means, every lesson we will be pushing to develop a more sophisticated understanding of the set-texts themselves, giving you a broader insight than many other students. This will take very little time and effort, but can yield invaluable results. Progress will be measured by means the close reading, practice exam-style essays, and evaluative conversations.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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25 Sep, 2018

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
English LiteratureA-level (A2)A*
HistoryA-level (A2)A
PhilosophyA-level (A2)A*
Extended Project QualificationA-level (A2)A*

General Availability

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Pre 12pm
12 - 5pm
After 5pm

Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrice
EnglishA Level£28 /hr
English LanguageA Level£28 /hr
English LiteratureA Level£28 /hr
English and World LiteratureA Level£28 /hr
EnglishGCSE£24 /hr
English LanguageGCSE£24 /hr
English LiteratureGCSE£24 /hr
English and World LiteratureGCSE£24 /hr
HistoryGCSE£24 /hr
Philosophy and EthicsGCSE£24 /hr
ELATUniversity£28 /hr
EnglishUniversity£28 /hr

Questions Fergus has answered

What should I do if I get an exam question which I don't have any quotes for?

Firstly, it is important to try to reduce the risk of this happening beforehand by learning as many quotations as possible. A good way to look at it is that no quote you learn will be unhelpful, and every quote you learn might be the key to unlocking a question. With a variety of quotes under your belt, the risk of being caught out on the day is lessened. Just trying to memorise one or two a day is easy at the time but will greatly help when exams come around.Take the following question, which is taken from a genuine A Level English paper a few years ago: "However difficult the process of learning may be, most works of literature move towards inevitably self-discovery." This question is daunting and seems very niche, and very few people will have learnt specifically about the process of self-discovery. Here, you have to sit back and try and break down the different parts of the question. Often isolating key words helps. From the above you could take "difficult[y]", "learning", "movement", "inevitab[ility]" and "self-discovery". You now have 5 ways into the question. You might not think you have any appropriate quotes, but looking at it this way you might realise you do have material about "movement". The following quote is from Great Expectations: "We changed again, and yet again, and it was now too late and too far to go back, and I went on. And the mists had all solemnly risen now, and the world lay spread before me." Here Pip is seemingly talking only about his journey from his house to London. But the idea of "changing" horses and "mists" rising seem to symbolise something else. Think about how Dickens uses the physical journey into a bigger world to represent Pip's trepidation. The quote is about literal "movement", but can be linked back to "difficulty", "inevitability" and eventually "self-discovery". In this way, when confronted with a difficult question, break it down, and think about how the quotations you have learnt might link back to it.Firstly, it is important to try to reduce the risk of this happening beforehand by learning as many quotations as possible. A good way to look at it is that no quote you learn will be unhelpful, and every quote you learn might be the key to unlocking a question. With a variety of quotes under your belt, the risk of being caught out on the day is lessened. Just trying to memorise one or two a day is easy at the time but will greatly help when exams come around.Take the following question, which is taken from a genuine A Level English paper a few years ago: "However difficult the process of learning may be, most works of literature move towards inevitably self-discovery." This question is daunting and seems very niche, and very few people will have learnt specifically about the process of self-discovery. Here, you have to sit back and try and break down the different parts of the question. Often isolating key words helps. From the above you could take "difficult[y]", "learning", "movement", "inevitab[ility]" and "self-discovery". You now have 5 ways into the question. You might not think you have any appropriate quotes, but looking at it this way you might realise you do have material about "movement". The following quote is from Great Expectations: "We changed again, and yet again, and it was now too late and too far to go back, and I went on. And the mists had all solemnly risen now, and the world lay spread before me." Here Pip is seemingly talking only about his journey from his house to London. But the idea of "changing" horses and "mists" rising seem to symbolise something else. Think about how Dickens uses the physical journey into a bigger world to represent Pip's trepidation. The quote is about literal "movement", but can be linked back to "difficulty", "inevitability" and eventually "self-discovery". In this way, when confronted with a difficult question, break it down, and think about how the quotations you have learnt might link back to it.

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5 months ago

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