Nathan O. GCSE Maths tutor, A Level Maths tutor, IB Maths tutor, GCSE...

Nathan O.

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Computer Science (Bachelors) - Manchester University

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About me

Hi, I'm Nathan Oldfield and I'm here to help you get the best grades you can get!

I'm a 22 year old Computer Science undergraduate at the University of Manchester. I greatly enjoy working to solve problems with logic and mathematics. Through my tutoring I aim not only to help you with material that you're struggling with - but also help you develop the confidence and logical resources to tackle any new and unfamiliar problems which you may face in your studies.

My most recent academic qualification is the integrated foundation year at the University of Manchester where I studied A-level physics and mathematics - I passed the year with an overall average of 84%.

I have a large bank of experience with tutoring, having spent 2 years teaching free guitar and bass guitar lessons as part of my International Baccalaureate. 

Thanks for reading, I look forward to hearing from you!

Hi, I'm Nathan Oldfield and I'm here to help you get the best grades you can get!

I'm a 22 year old Computer Science undergraduate at the University of Manchester. I greatly enjoy working to solve problems with logic and mathematics. Through my tutoring I aim not only to help you with material that you're struggling with - but also help you develop the confidence and logical resources to tackle any new and unfamiliar problems which you may face in your studies.

My most recent academic qualification is the integrated foundation year at the University of Manchester where I studied A-level physics and mathematics - I passed the year with an overall average of 84%.

I have a large bank of experience with tutoring, having spent 2 years teaching free guitar and bass guitar lessons as part of my International Baccalaureate. 

Thanks for reading, I look forward to hearing from you!

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We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
MathsA-level (A2)A
PhysicsA-level (A2)A

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
MathsA Level£20 /hr
MathsGCSE£18 /hr
PhysicsGCSE£18 /hr
MathsIB£20 /hr

Questions Nathan has answered

How can I know whether to multiply or add probabilities?

We can only add probabilities when the events are alternatives. For example, let's say we want to calculate the probability that we achieve an A or a B or a C in a given exam. We cannot achieve an A and B for the same exam, so these events are indeed alternatives.

So let's say there's a 1/10 chance of getting an A, a 3/10 chance of getting a B and 4/10 chance of getting a C. The chance that we get either an A, B or C would be the sum of the individual probabilities: (1/10 + 3/10 + 4/10), so 8/10. 

Think about the problem numerically. We know that all probabilities lie in the range from 0 to 1. Addition of such numbers will lead to an increased probability value. Multiplication of such numbers will lead to a decreased probability value. In this case, we'd expect the probability of attaining A or B or C to be greater than the probability of simply attaining an A. And yes, we have an 8/10 chance of attaining an A,B or C and only a 1/10 chance of attaining an A - this is what we'd expect. 

We multiply probabilites when we want events to occur simultaneously, or consecutively. Let's say we're going to sit the same exam twice. We want to find the probability of attaining a C first time and an A on the re-sit. Before we dive in let's think about the expected probability value: getting a C AND THEN an A is a very unique scenario, and as such we'd expect quite a low probability in relation to the probabilities of individual events. This hints to us that multiplication could be the correct method.

So in this case, yes, we can say that the probability of getting a C and then an A is (4/10 * 1/10), so 1/25. 

We can only add probabilities when the events are alternatives. For example, let's say we want to calculate the probability that we achieve an A or a B or a C in a given exam. We cannot achieve an A and B for the same exam, so these events are indeed alternatives.

So let's say there's a 1/10 chance of getting an A, a 3/10 chance of getting a B and 4/10 chance of getting a C. The chance that we get either an A, B or C would be the sum of the individual probabilities: (1/10 + 3/10 + 4/10), so 8/10. 

Think about the problem numerically. We know that all probabilities lie in the range from 0 to 1. Addition of such numbers will lead to an increased probability value. Multiplication of such numbers will lead to a decreased probability value. In this case, we'd expect the probability of attaining A or B or C to be greater than the probability of simply attaining an A. And yes, we have an 8/10 chance of attaining an A,B or C and only a 1/10 chance of attaining an A - this is what we'd expect. 

We multiply probabilites when we want events to occur simultaneously, or consecutively. Let's say we're going to sit the same exam twice. We want to find the probability of attaining a C first time and an A on the re-sit. Before we dive in let's think about the expected probability value: getting a C AND THEN an A is a very unique scenario, and as such we'd expect quite a low probability in relation to the probabilities of individual events. This hints to us that multiplication could be the correct method.

So in this case, yes, we can say that the probability of getting a C and then an A is (4/10 * 1/10), so 1/25. 

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3 years ago

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