Zoe C.

Zoe C.

£20 - £25 /hr

Neuroscience (Bachelors) - St Catherine's College, Oxford University

5.0
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10 reviews

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19 completed lessons

About me

Hi, I’m Zoe, and I graduated this year from Oxford with a BA in Neuroscience. I tutor Biology, Chemistry and Maths, as well as help with Oxbridge and university applications. I have experience tutoring younger undergraduates and working with children.

 

I really enjoyed studying neuroscience at university. Many people may think that science subjects are all about facts and rote learning, but I found the opposite. Studying neuroscience gave me the opportunity to combine my love for science with my creative side, through critically reading literature and devising new ideas for research and experiments.

 

I left school with some of the best grades in my year, despite not having the best teachers and teaching most of the course to myself. While difficult at the time, this has given me a lot of knowledge about the most effective way to study for exams to help you achieve your best grades.

 

During my degree, I learned all I could about what Oxford really want from applicants. I want to share this knowledge to give people the same opportunity I had! I can help with personal statements, BMAT and interview practice.

Hi, I’m Zoe, and I graduated this year from Oxford with a BA in Neuroscience. I tutor Biology, Chemistry and Maths, as well as help with Oxbridge and university applications. I have experience tutoring younger undergraduates and working with children.

 

I really enjoyed studying neuroscience at university. Many people may think that science subjects are all about facts and rote learning, but I found the opposite. Studying neuroscience gave me the opportunity to combine my love for science with my creative side, through critically reading literature and devising new ideas for research and experiments.

 

I left school with some of the best grades in my year, despite not having the best teachers and teaching most of the course to myself. While difficult at the time, this has given me a lot of knowledge about the most effective way to study for exams to help you achieve your best grades.

 

During my degree, I learned all I could about what Oxford really want from applicants. I want to share this knowledge to give people the same opportunity I had! I can help with personal statements, BMAT and interview practice.

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About my sessions

I will base sessions around an individual's needs to make sure our time is spent effectively. I actively encourage you to let me know what kind of teaching style works for you or fits your specific needs, but I do have my own teaching style that focuses on 'active recall'.


I believe the best way to learn is by applying your knowledge to a problem. This not only helps you to identify gaps in your knowledge, but also improves your memory for the material you're trying to learn. Studies have shown that ‘active recall’ strategies – which is just anything that requires you to use cognitive effort, or 'brain power', to retrieve information from your memory – are more effective studying techniques than other commonly used methods such as note-taking and passive reading (Dunlosky et al, 2013).


To apply this to a tutorial, I might ask you to complete some questions or a past paper so that we can talk through your answers and identify areas for improvement. If you had any problems understanding a concept, I'd always try to ask you to explain it to me as much as you can, and then lead you in the right direction with a few pointed questions, as this is what will help you actually learn!

I will base sessions around an individual's needs to make sure our time is spent effectively. I actively encourage you to let me know what kind of teaching style works for you or fits your specific needs, but I do have my own teaching style that focuses on 'active recall'.


I believe the best way to learn is by applying your knowledge to a problem. This not only helps you to identify gaps in your knowledge, but also improves your memory for the material you're trying to learn. Studies have shown that ‘active recall’ strategies – which is just anything that requires you to use cognitive effort, or 'brain power', to retrieve information from your memory – are more effective studying techniques than other commonly used methods such as note-taking and passive reading (Dunlosky et al, 2013).


To apply this to a tutorial, I might ask you to complete some questions or a past paper so that we can talk through your answers and identify areas for improvement. If you had any problems understanding a concept, I'd always try to ask you to explain it to me as much as you can, and then lead you in the right direction with a few pointed questions, as this is what will help you actually learn!

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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08/11/2018

Ratings & Reviews

5
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Shumile Student Lesson review 26 Oct, 18:00

26 Oct

for a first lesson, a.m.a.z.i.n.g, I definitely feel more confident for my BMAT exam now

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Shumile Student Lesson review 6 Dec, 18:00

6 Dec

once again I feel a lot more confident with my work and most important of all I understand everything!

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Shumile Student Lesson review 27 Oct, 18:00

27 Oct

a very informative and well-prepared lesson!

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Moroti Student Lesson review 28 Nov, 19:15

28 Nov

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
BiologyA-level (A2)A*
MathsA-level (A2)A*
ChemistryA-level (A2)A
SpanishA-level (A2)A
BMAT (BioMedical Admissions)Uni admission testSECTION 1: 4.9, SECTION 2: 7.1, SECTION 3: 4A
NeuroscienceDegree (Bachelors)2.1

General Availability

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Pre 12pm
12 - 5pm
After 5pm

Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
BiologyA Level£22 /hr
BiologyGCSE£20 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£20 /hr
MathsGCSE£20 /hr
Oxbridge PreparationMentoring£22 /hr
Personal StatementsMentoring£22 /hr
BMAT (BioMedical Admissions)University£25 /hr
BiologyUniversity£25 /hr

Questions Zoe has answered

How does saltatory conduction work?

Most axons in the human nervous system are myelinated, meaning they are enclosed in a myelin sheath, a fatty deposit created and maintained by Schwann cells that acts as an electrical insulator. There are small gaps in the sheath around 1-2 micrometers apart. These gaps are known as the nodes of Ranvier.

Because the myelin sheath prevents the flow of current, and ion channels are only present in high densities in the membrane at the nodes of Ranvier, action potentials are generated only at nodes. During an action potential when Na+ ions rush into the neuron, the intracellular environment at the node becomes more positively charged relative to the next node along the axon. As such, the positive ions within the already-depolarised section of the axon are ‘pushed’ along the electrical gradient towards the more negative environment at the next node. The arrival of positive ions at this node depolarises this section of the axon as well, initiating another action potential. This process is repeated, allowing the action potential to propagate rapidly along the axon, effectively ‘jumping’ between nodes.

This ‘jumping’ mechanism is known as saltatory conduction. It minimises the length of the axon that needs to depolarise in order for an action potential to propagate. This reduces energy used and makes action potentials travel much faster than in unmyelinated axons, which (in most situations) is preferable to minimise the delay between the initiation of the electrical signal and the response of the next neuron or the effector, as many of our axons have to be very long (the motor neuron that travels from your spinal cord all the way down to the muscles in your foot, for example!). However, there are still some unmyelinated axons within the human nervous system. For example, the axons of the pain receptors in your skin that are responsible specifically for that delayed but longer-lasting ‘dull’ pain after you’re hurt are unmyelinated.
Most axons in the human nervous system are myelinated, meaning they are enclosed in a myelin sheath, a fatty deposit created and maintained by Schwann cells that acts as an electrical insulator. There are small gaps in the sheath around 1-2 micrometers apart. These gaps are known as the nodes of Ranvier.

Because the myelin sheath prevents the flow of current, and ion channels are only present in high densities in the membrane at the nodes of Ranvier, action potentials are generated only at nodes. During an action potential when Na+ ions rush into the neuron, the intracellular environment at the node becomes more positively charged relative to the next node along the axon. As such, the positive ions within the already-depolarised section of the axon are ‘pushed’ along the electrical gradient towards the more negative environment at the next node. The arrival of positive ions at this node depolarises this section of the axon as well, initiating another action potential. This process is repeated, allowing the action potential to propagate rapidly along the axon, effectively ‘jumping’ between nodes.

This ‘jumping’ mechanism is known as saltatory conduction. It minimises the length of the axon that needs to depolarise in order for an action potential to propagate. This reduces energy used and makes action potentials travel much faster than in unmyelinated axons, which (in most situations) is preferable to minimise the delay between the initiation of the electrical signal and the response of the next neuron or the effector, as many of our axons have to be very long (the motor neuron that travels from your spinal cord all the way down to the muscles in your foot, for example!). However, there are still some unmyelinated axons within the human nervous system. For example, the axons of the pain receptors in your skin that are responsible specifically for that delayed but longer-lasting ‘dull’ pain after you’re hurt are unmyelinated.

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2 months ago

40 views

On complete combustion in air, a sample of an unknown hydrocarbon yielded 176 grams of CO2 and 108 grams of H2O with no additional products. Which one of the following might be the formula of the hydrocarbon? (Relative atomic masses: H=1, C =12, O =16)

a) CH2
b) CH3
c) CH4
d) C2H4
e) C2H8

The equation for the combustion of the hydrocarbon is: CxHy+ (A + 0.5B)O2 --> A.CO2+ B.H2OMoles = mass/ArMoles of CO2= 176/44 = 4 = A

Moles of H2O = 108/18 = 6 = B

Substitute the moles into the equation: CxHy+ 7O2 --> 4CO+ 6H2O

To balance the equation, there must be 4 carbon atoms and 12 hydrogen atoms on the left side. The formula of the hydrocarbon must either contain 4 carbon and 12 hydrogen atoms, or contain a number of carbon and hydrogen atoms that are factors of 4 and 12, respectively.

Therefore, the options for the formula of the hydrocarbon are: C4H12, C2H6or CH3 Out of those, CH3is the only option given, so the answer is B.
a) CH2
b) CH3
c) CH4
d) C2H4
e) C2H8

The equation for the combustion of the hydrocarbon is: CxHy+ (A + 0.5B)O2 --> A.CO2+ B.H2OMoles = mass/ArMoles of CO2= 176/44 = 4 = A

Moles of H2O = 108/18 = 6 = B

Substitute the moles into the equation: CxHy+ 7O2 --> 4CO+ 6H2O

To balance the equation, there must be 4 carbon atoms and 12 hydrogen atoms on the left side. The formula of the hydrocarbon must either contain 4 carbon and 12 hydrogen atoms, or contain a number of carbon and hydrogen atoms that are factors of 4 and 12, respectively.

Therefore, the options for the formula of the hydrocarbon are: C4H12, C2H6or CH3 Out of those, CH3is the only option given, so the answer is B.

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2 months ago

8 views

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