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Bethany H.

Degree: History (Bachelors) - Durham University

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About me

About me:

I am currently in my third year at Durham University, studying History with a French module, having achieved a First in my first two years and three A*s at A level in History, Maths and French. After my A levels I spent a year working as a teacher in a secondary school in Guyana, teaching Maths, English, Reading and IT. I also gave 1-1 and 2-1 lessons to students writing their CXCs (GCSE equivalent) in Maths and at the age of 16 my students progressed from not knowing their 2 times table to inverse matrices and simultaneous equations! I also spent 2 months teaching and tutoring in Nepal. I would love to help you achieve the grades you want: whether it’s a pass or an A*, whether you need to go back to basics or just improve your understanding, I’d be happy to work with you whatever your ability.

About my sessions

During the Meet the Tutor session I will ask you which areas you are struggling with so I can prepare for your first tutorial in order to make it as beneficial as possible for you. We will go through topics as slowly as necessary and you will have a chance to ask as many questions as you want. But my aim for each tutorial is that by the end you will be answering the questions, correctly of course, and hopefully we will have had a few laughs on the way.

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
History A Level £26 /hr
French GCSE £24 /hr
History GCSE £24 /hr
Maths GCSE £24 /hr
Maths 13 Plus £24 /hr
Maths 11 Plus £24 /hr

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationLevelGrade
HistoryA-levelA2A*
MathematicsA-levelA2A*
FrenchA-levelA2A*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

19/05/2014

CRB/DBS Enhanced

21/01/2011

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Ratings and reviews

5from 76 customer reviews

Courtney (Student)

I have had tutoring by Bethany on a weekly basis since about November last year. I was hopeless at maths and had no confidence at all. Bethany went over things as many times as I needed and gave me validation which was great for my confidence and even little homework tasks to complete for next session. She was very friendly and I would absolutely recommend her to anyone, I got my GCSE results today and I passed maths which I didn't think was possible when I began getting tuition. Bethany was a lovely tutor and brilliant and enthusiastic with the subjects that she teaches. Definitely 5 stars!

Courtney (Student) June 4 2017

A brilliant tutor I would recommend Bethany to everyone!

Courtney (Student) May 23 2017

Brilliant tutor, would recommend to anyone!

Courtney (Student) April 15 2017

Brilliant as always
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Questions Bethany has answered

How do you conjugate verbs in the pluperfect tense in French?

To conjugate a verb in the pluperfect tense in French, you need three parts: the subject pronoun (ie. Je, tu il, nous, vous, ils); the imperfect of avoir or être; and the past participle of the verb. It’s important to have a good understanding of the perfect tense before attempting the pluperf...

To conjugate a verb in the pluperfect tense in French, you need three parts: the subject pronoun (ie. Je, tu il, nous, vous, ils); the imperfect of avoir or être; and the past participle of the verb. It’s important to have a good understanding of the perfect tense before attempting the pluperfect tense.

Let’s break it down.

For all the verbs that use avoir in the normal past perfect tense (that’s most verbs), avoir is also used in the pluperfect.

To form avoir in the imperfect, simply add the imperfect endings to av:

J’                                  av                                            ais                                            avais   

Tu                                av                                            ais                                            avais   

Il/elle/on                     av                                            ait                                            avait

Nous                            av                    +                      ions                  =                      avions

Vous                            av                                            iez                                            aviez   

Ils/elles                        av                                            aient                                        avaient

All the other verbs use être, just like in the perfect tense. This includes all reflexive verbs (eg se lever/s’habiller) and the ‘MRS VAN DE TRAMP’ verbs:

Monter

Rester

Sortir                                       Remember verbs formed from these verbs also use être, for

Venir                                       example ‘devenir’ from ‘venir’ or ‘rentrer’ from ‘entrer’

Arriver

Naître

Descendre

Entrer

Tomber

Retourner

Aller

Mourir

Partir                          

To form être in the imperfect, add the imperfect endings to ét:

J’                    ét                                 ais                               étais

Tu                  ét                                 ais                               étais

Il/elle/on         ét                                 ait                                était

Nous              ét               +                ions              =             étions

Vous              ét                                 iez                               étiez

Ils/elles                        ét                                             aient                                        étaient

Once you have the correct form of the imperfect, you just add the past participle of the verb – the same one that is used for the perfect tense.

Examples: aider – aidé

                  faire – fait

                  boire – bu

So, let’s put it together. Imagine you want to say I had eaten. ‘Manger’ means ‘to eat’ so you are working with that verb and because it’s ‘I’ you use the subject pronoun ‘je’. In the perfect tense, ‘manger’ uses ‘avoir’ so that’s the verb you use here, put into the imperfect tense, conjugated in the first person ‘I’ form. Putting it together we have:

Subject pronoun                   Avoir in imperfect                             Past participle of                                                                                                                   manger

J’                                              avais                                                    mangé                        

Another example: She had gone. ‘Aller’ means ‘to go’ and you are using ‘elle’ for ‘she’. Aller is a MRS VAN DE TRAMP verb so you use être instead of avoir.

Subject pronoun                   Etre in imperfect                               Past participle of aller

Elle                                          était                                                     allée

Careful here – remember how in the perfect tense you need to add an ‘e’ to the past participle for females and an ‘s’ if there’s more than one person? The same goes for the pluperfect tense – that’s why there’s an extra ‘e’ on the past participle of aller.

One more example – a tricky one! They (male) had gone to bed. The verb ‘se coucher’ is used to say ‘to go to bed’ – it’s a reflexive! So this time, just like in the perfect tense, we need to include the reflexive part of the verb (me, te, se, nous, vous, se), and it goes in front of the ‘être’ that’s been put in the imperfect tense. So, you are using ‘ils’ for they and être, as with all reflexives.

Subject pronoun       Reflexive bit   Etre in imperfect       Past participle of coucher

Ils                                 s’                      étaient                         couchés

And don’t forget that extra ‘s’ on couché to show more than one person.

So, just remember those three parts – subject pronoun, imperfect of avoir or être, past participle – and, as long as you conjugate them correctly, you can’t go wrong!

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2 years ago

1473 views

How do you substitute a number into an algebraic expression?

To substitute a number into an algebraic expression, all you need to do is re-write the expression in exactly the same way, except replacing the variable (letter) with the number. It always makes it clearer to put the number in brackets too. Then you can simplify your new expression and you ha...

To substitute a number into an algebraic expression, all you need to do is re-write the expression in exactly the same way, except replacing the variable (letter) with the number. It always makes it clearer to put the number in brackets too. Then you can simplify your new expression and you have your answer!

Let's have a look at an example.

3x+7 where x = 5

So here, x is the variable and you are substituting in the number 5. All you do is write back the expression but with 5 instead of x. And don’t forget those brackets!

3(5) + 7

Now to simplify, just multiply out the brackets and add the 7:

3 x 5 + 7

= 15 + 7

= 22

And that’s your answer!

How about a harder example:

2y2 – 3y + 4 where y = 2

You do this one in exactly the same way, but this time the variable is y and the number is 2. So, write back the expression with 2 (in brackets!) instead of y:

2(2)2 – 3(2) + 4

And simplify… remember, always do the brackets first:

2 x 22 – 3 x 2 + 4

= 2 x 4 – 3 x 2 + 4

Multiplication always comes before addition and subtraction:

= 8 – 6 + 4

= 6

One more example, this time with two variables.

4x2 – y2 + 2xy where x = - 3 and y = 4

You have to be a bit more careful with this one – make sure you include the negative sign in the brackets when you replace x with (-3) and instead of y, write 4.

4(-3)2 – (4)2 + 2(-3)(4)

Start simplifying…

= 4 x (-3)2 – (4)2 + 2 x -3 x 4

Remember when you square a negative number you get a positive solution:

= 4 x 9 – 16 + 2 x -3 x 4

= 36 – 16 + (-24)

= - 4

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2 years ago

911 views
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