Kieren M.

Kieren M.

£30 - £32 /hr

Physics with Astrophysics (Bachelors) - Glasgow University

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18 completed lessons

About me

I'm currently studying Physics with Astrophysics at the University of Glasgow with an Academic Excellence scholarship. I chose Physics because I love the emphasis on understanding & the simple logic behind the learning: essentially, once you've grasped the basic principles, you have all you need to understand everything else.

This comes through in my teaching: I aim to help my students to understand the core concepts of their subject & encourage them to build their knowledge onto what will be a stable base of understanding. I also always try to give my students something interesting to think about within the subject, so that they remain engaged rather than working purely because they have to. Science does not have to be dry and factual! There is a wealth of interesting material to be learnt, discussed and applied, if it is taught and spoken about in an engaging way.

As well as my passion for Physics, I'm very involved in the arts: while living in London I was a member of the Barbican Youth Panel, I've participated in panels at the Almeida Theatre, & I write for the magazine 'i-D'. Theatre & Literature are my preferred art forms, which of course comes in handy when tutoring English, & giving book recommendations (which I am very liable to do if the student seems interested.)

I am enthusiastic, experienced, & I'll get you to where you need to be!


I'm currently studying Physics with Astrophysics at the University of Glasgow with an Academic Excellence scholarship. I chose Physics because I love the emphasis on understanding & the simple logic behind the learning: essentially, once you've grasped the basic principles, you have all you need to understand everything else.

This comes through in my teaching: I aim to help my students to understand the core concepts of their subject & encourage them to build their knowledge onto what will be a stable base of understanding. I also always try to give my students something interesting to think about within the subject, so that they remain engaged rather than working purely because they have to. Science does not have to be dry and factual! There is a wealth of interesting material to be learnt, discussed and applied, if it is taught and spoken about in an engaging way.

As well as my passion for Physics, I'm very involved in the arts: while living in London I was a member of the Barbican Youth Panel, I've participated in panels at the Almeida Theatre, & I write for the magazine 'i-D'. Theatre & Literature are my preferred art forms, which of course comes in handy when tutoring English, & giving book recommendations (which I am very liable to do if the student seems interested.)

I am enthusiastic, experienced, & I'll get you to where you need to be!


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About my sessions

Ultimately my goal is to provide the student with the help they need to achieve the level of understanding that they want. I've worked with astronomers at the Royal Observatory Greenwich to deliver educational sessions and have tutored students in the Sciences & Maths (& English Lit/Lang!) before, so I am well versed in how to explain difficult ideas in an accessible manner, ensuring that the information is made clear. 

So long as I've covered any questions, I like to work with my students during our meetings. As well as running through theory, we work through exercises, & I give pointers on how the student could better their answers/method of working, rather than just supplying them with the correct answers. I always try to fit in at least one exercise, even if the student has lots of questions. 

I also set exercises to complete between our sessions, which we later go over. I'm happy for students to message me, be that about my work or homework (within reason.) I can also send my students extra resources such as articles/videos, to foster an interest in the subject.

I always ask my students if they are finding any area particularly difficult, or whether they have found any of my explanations unclear, and aim to resolve this as soon as I can.

Ultimately my goal is to provide the student with the help they need to achieve the level of understanding that they want. I've worked with astronomers at the Royal Observatory Greenwich to deliver educational sessions and have tutored students in the Sciences & Maths (& English Lit/Lang!) before, so I am well versed in how to explain difficult ideas in an accessible manner, ensuring that the information is made clear. 

So long as I've covered any questions, I like to work with my students during our meetings. As well as running through theory, we work through exercises, & I give pointers on how the student could better their answers/method of working, rather than just supplying them with the correct answers. I always try to fit in at least one exercise, even if the student has lots of questions. 

I also set exercises to complete between our sessions, which we later go over. I'm happy for students to message me, be that about my work or homework (within reason.) I can also send my students extra resources such as articles/videos, to foster an interest in the subject.

I always ask my students if they are finding any area particularly difficult, or whether they have found any of my explanations unclear, and aim to resolve this as soon as I can.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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5 Feb

Ratings & Reviews

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Shrut Student

7 Mar

Kieren is a very interactive teacher. His way of teaching has proved itself (in my case ,anyway) by teaching what the student or the learner wants to learn. On the first introductory lesson he sort of analyzed what I had interest in and in what way I would like to learn it best. Since then he has used that same method and it surely has worked. I could do anything that Kieren taught from lesson 1 with ease. In a nutshell, I have found Kieren to be an excellent teacher with profound knowledge in what he teaches.

10 Mar

Kieren's reply

Thanks so much Shrut! You've proved yourself to be very eager to gain that knowledge, so it's a pleasure to be able to teach you.

SR

Sam Parent from Dalkeith

5 Mar

Very useful information, helped a lot with areas I struggled in. Even taught some important things we weren't taught in class.

10 Mar

Kieren's reply

Thanks so much for the feedback! Glad the session was useful.

DK

Dilveen Student

Yesterday

DE

Donna Parent from Milan

17 Mar

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
PhysicsA-level (A2)A
ChemistryA-level (A2)A*
MathsA-level (A2)A*
Further MathematicsA-level (A2)B
EPQ DissertationOtherA*

General Availability

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Pre 12pm
12 - 5pm
After 5pm

Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrice
MathsA Level£32 /hr
PhysicsA Level£32 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£30 /hr
English LanguageGCSE£30 /hr
English LiteratureGCSE£30 /hr
Further MathematicsGCSE£30 /hr
MathsGCSE£30 /hr
PhysicsGCSE£30 /hr
Maths13 Plus£30 /hr
Maths11 Plus£30 /hr

Questions Kieren has answered

Where does the formula for gravitational potential come from? Why the minus sign?

We know Newton's Law of Gravitation, which states that the force F between two bodies of masses M and m respectively, separated by distance R, can be given by: F = GMm/R2where G is the gravitational constant. We're looking to get to gravitational potential, denoted by 'V', which is defined as the gravitational potential energy per unit mass of an object as its current point in space. We know that energy = work done = force x perpendicular distance. Using our first eqn, we get: energy = work done = GMm/R, & therefore the magnitude of V for an object of mass m is GM/R. However, we also know that V by definition is the work done in moving our object from 'infinity' (the hypothetical point at which gravity = 0) to its current position in space. Also by definition, we know that the force of gravity is purely attractive, therefore rather than expending energy by moving our object from infinity to its current position, we release energy. Think of 2 magnets, with opposing poles facing each other. If you're holding one magnet away from the other, it takes effort to keep them separated: if you were to let go of one it would move towards the other by itself, i.e. the work done in moving the two magnets towards each other is negative because they pull each other. The same is true for gravitational force, negative work is done in moving our object away from infinity because it's attracted towards other masses. Applying this theory to our eqn derived above, we get: V = -GM/R, as desired.We know Newton's Law of Gravitation, which states that the force F between two bodies of masses M and m respectively, separated by distance R, can be given by: F = GMm/R2where G is the gravitational constant. We're looking to get to gravitational potential, denoted by 'V', which is defined as the gravitational potential energy per unit mass of an object as its current point in space. We know that energy = work done = force x perpendicular distance. Using our first eqn, we get: energy = work done = GMm/R, & therefore the magnitude of V for an object of mass m is GM/R. However, we also know that V by definition is the work done in moving our object from 'infinity' (the hypothetical point at which gravity = 0) to its current position in space. Also by definition, we know that the force of gravity is purely attractive, therefore rather than expending energy by moving our object from infinity to its current position, we release energy. Think of 2 magnets, with opposing poles facing each other. If you're holding one magnet away from the other, it takes effort to keep them separated: if you were to let go of one it would move towards the other by itself, i.e. the work done in moving the two magnets towards each other is negative because they pull each other. The same is true for gravitational force, negative work is done in moving our object away from infinity because it's attracted towards other masses. Applying this theory to our eqn derived above, we get: V = -GM/R, as desired.

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5 months ago

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