PremiumColleen A. GCSE French tutor, A Level French tutor, GCSE German tutor...

Colleen A.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Modern Languages-French&German (Bachelors) - Durham University

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About me

About me:

Hi! My name is Colleen and I am an undergraduate student at Durham University, studying Modern Languages and Cultures (French & German). I have a love for foreign language learning and am passionate about getting other young people interested in French and German. As well as having tutored both languages to school pupils, I have spent time in France as an au pair, teaching English as a foreign language to young children. 

Our tutoring sessions:

I would like to get you speaking French or German as early as possible, in order to develop your confidence (I know just how nerve-wracking it can be!), so that you can go out and use it. However I understand that your goal may not be just to learn conversational French or German but to focus on your exams. I am happy for you to guide the sessions, as to what we will cover and I will adapt my teaching to how you learn best. I tutor GCSE and A-level French and German and look at past papers, honing in on exam techniques

What happens next?

Feel free to drop me a message in the box below and we can organise a free 15 minute Meet The Tutor Session. Let me know if you have any questions or queries and I will get back to you as soon as possible. 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
French A Level £24 /hr
German A Level £24 /hr
French GCSE £22 /hr
German GCSE £22 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
FrenchA-LevelA*
German A-LevelA*
Drama & Theatre StudiesA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Ratings and reviews

4.9from 8 customer reviews

Joanne (Parent) May 24 2016

A great tutor would highly recommend.

Joanne (Parent) April 20 2016

Colleen is a great tutor. She has really improved my daughter's confidence and fluency in French. Thanks Joanne

Claire (Student) April 20 2016

Really helpful tutorial as always, Colleen is a really great tutor, she has really helped me prepared for my AS French speaking resit with past exam questions and spontaneous talk.

Claire (Student) March 2 2016

Colleen is an amazing French tutor. She has really helped me with my French grammar and my preparation for my A level speaking exams. She is really friendly and helpful and has helped me identify mistakes in my pronunciation.
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Questions Colleen has answered

How do you use the Nominative Case in German?

Although we don't use them in English, cases are really important in German! Every noun/pronoun in a German sentence is in a particular case, depending on its function in the sentence.  There are 4 cases – The Nominative, The Accusative, The Dative and The Genitive. I am going to teach you h...

Although we don't use them in English, cases are really important in German!

Every noun/pronoun in a German sentence is in a particular case, depending on its function in the sentence. 

There are 4 cases – The Nominative, The Accusative, The Dative and The Genitive.

I am going to teach you how to use The Nominative Case:

The SUBJECT of a German sentence i.e the person/thing in charge of or doing the verb is in the nominative case. 

e.g. Ich wohne in England.                                                  I live in England. 

(In this example ‘ich’ is in the nominative because it is the SUBJECT of the sentence. The pronoun ‘ich’ is in charge of/doing the verb ‘wohnen’.)

The Nominative Case is also used after the verbs:

bleiben (to stay), heiβen (to be called), scheinen (to seem/shine), sein (to be), werden (to become) 

e.g. Sein Vater ist mein Lehrer.                                          His father is my teacher. 

(In this example ‘sein Vater’ is in the nominative because it is the SUBJECT of the sentence AND ‘mein Lehrer’ is also in the nominative because it comes after the verb ‘sein’.)

In the three other cases, articles may be declined (change form), however the nominative case is the only one where they do not change. 

Here are the definite and indefinite articles in the nominative case:

Definite Article: Masculine – der                                           (the)          Feminine – die                                                             Neuter – das                                                                Plural – die 

Indefinite Article: Masculine – ein                                        (a/an)           Feminine – eine                                                          Neuter – ein                                                                  Plural – (k)eine 

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1 year ago

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