Gemma P. GCSE Biology tutor, GCSE Chemistry tutor, GCSE Maths tutor

Gemma P.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Studying: Natural Sciences (Bachelors) - Durham University

5.0
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38 reviews| 52 completed tutorials

Contact Gemma

About me

About Me I am a second year student studying Biology and Chemistry as part of a Natural Sciences Degree at Durham University and have been tutoring with MyTutor for 9 months. I have always had a passion for science and teaching, both academically and non-academically, and have a broad understanding of the relevant scientific areas for GCSE and A-level. I started teaching figure skating at the age of 14 to people of all ages, so I have experience teaching to a range of age groups and individuals. I have also coordnated revision sessions with my friends, helping them understnad key scientific concepts and ultimately helping them pass their GCSE's! I can understand the frustration when you can't grasp a concept and sometimes in the classroom the topics are taught at such a fast pace that it is impossible to keep up. This is where I come in! I am a patient, friendly person with tutoring experience who loves to watch students' progress becoming more confident in their subject. The Sessions The most important thing is that the sessions are about you! You can decide what we cover at whatever pace is comfortable for you. Remember no question is a stupid question! The sessions are designed to be fun and to let you not just memorise key concepts but to help you understand them so that you feel confident in answering questions in the exam. I may use different techniques during the sessions to help you understand (diagrams, drawings and analogies etc.). Everyone learns differently and thus my sessions will be designed for you as an individual.  What Next? If you have any questions, feel free to send me a WebMail or MeetTheTutor Session request and we can discuss what you want to cover. Just tell me your exam board, subject and level and I'll look forward to meeting you!About Me I am a second year student studying Biology and Chemistry as part of a Natural Sciences Degree at Durham University and have been tutoring with MyTutor for 9 months. I have always had a passion for science and teaching, both academically and non-academically, and have a broad understanding of the relevant scientific areas for GCSE and A-level. I started teaching figure skating at the age of 14 to people of all ages, so I have experience teaching to a range of age groups and individuals. I have also coordnated revision sessions with my friends, helping them understnad key scientific concepts and ultimately helping them pass their GCSE's! I can understand the frustration when you can't grasp a concept and sometimes in the classroom the topics are taught at such a fast pace that it is impossible to keep up. This is where I come in! I am a patient, friendly person with tutoring experience who loves to watch students' progress becoming more confident in their subject. The Sessions The most important thing is that the sessions are about you! You can decide what we cover at whatever pace is comfortable for you. Remember no question is a stupid question! The sessions are designed to be fun and to let you not just memorise key concepts but to help you understand them so that you feel confident in answering questions in the exam. I may use different techniques during the sessions to help you understand (diagrams, drawings and analogies etc.). Everyone learns differently and thus my sessions will be designed for you as an individual.  What Next? If you have any questions, feel free to send me a WebMail or MeetTheTutor Session request and we can discuss what you want to cover. Just tell me your exam board, subject and level and I'll look forward to meeting you!

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18/06/2015

Ratings & Reviews

5from 38 customer reviews
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Susan (Parent)

March 15 2017

Excellent tutorial! My son looks forward to his tutorials and is definitely benefitting from them. Gemma is a reliable tutor. Would recommend.

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Susan (Parent)

February 1 2017

Great as always! Just about to book another tutorial.

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Susan (Parent)

January 12 2017

Excellent tutorial! Thank you

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Susan (Parent)

November 30 2016

Many thanks for a great tutorial!

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
ChemistryA-level (A2)B
BiologyA-level (A2)A
GeologyA-level (A2)A
MathsA-level (A2)A

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
BiologyGCSE£22 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£22 /hr
MathsGCSE£22 /hr

Questions Gemma has answered

Balance the Chemical Equation for the reaction of calcium carbonate with hydrochloric acid: CaCO3+ HCl -> CaCl2 + CO2 + H2O

To balance chemical equations we need to look at each element individually on both sides of the equation. 

To start with we can add up the elements to see which are unbalanced.


CaCO3 + HCl -> CaCl2 + CO2 + H2O


There is one Calcium atom on the left and one Calcium atom on the right so this is balanced.

There is 1 Carbon atom on the left and 1 Carbon atom on the right so this is balanced.

There are 3 Oxygen atoms on the left and 3 Oxygen atoms on the right so this is balanced.

There is 1 hydrogen atom on the left but 2 on the right so this is unbalanced. Therefore we need to balance it by using 2 molecules of HCl:


CaCO3 + 2HCl -> CaCl2 + CO2 + H2O


Lastly we need to check that the chlorine is balanced, and it is as we can see there are now 2 on each side. Therefore this is now a balanced equation.

Whenever we balance an eqaution you have to change the number of molecules used represented by the big numbers before a molecule e.g 2HCl. You cannot change the subscript (small) numbers as this is the number of each element in a molecule, and you would end up making up your own molecule that doesn't make sense! For example you could not do H2Cl!

The easiest way to balance equations is by going through step by step and each time you make a change- check how it affects the rest of the equation. 

To balance chemical equations we need to look at each element individually on both sides of the equation. 

To start with we can add up the elements to see which are unbalanced.


CaCO3 + HCl -> CaCl2 + CO2 + H2O


There is one Calcium atom on the left and one Calcium atom on the right so this is balanced.

There is 1 Carbon atom on the left and 1 Carbon atom on the right so this is balanced.

There are 3 Oxygen atoms on the left and 3 Oxygen atoms on the right so this is balanced.

There is 1 hydrogen atom on the left but 2 on the right so this is unbalanced. Therefore we need to balance it by using 2 molecules of HCl:


CaCO3 + 2HCl -> CaCl2 + CO2 + H2O


Lastly we need to check that the chlorine is balanced, and it is as we can see there are now 2 on each side. Therefore this is now a balanced equation.

Whenever we balance an eqaution you have to change the number of molecules used represented by the big numbers before a molecule e.g 2HCl. You cannot change the subscript (small) numbers as this is the number of each element in a molecule, and you would end up making up your own molecule that doesn't make sense! For example you could not do H2Cl!

The easiest way to balance equations is by going through step by step and each time you make a change- check how it affects the rest of the equation. 

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2 years ago

91918 views

Describe the role of blood vessels in the control of body temperature.

The control of body temperature as well as other factors such as blood CO2 concentration, or blood glucose concetration is part of a biological mechanism called homeostasis. 

Blood vessels have the ability to dilate and constrict to control body temperatre. 

When body temperature is too low, the tiny blood vessels near the surface of the skin (capillaries) constrict (vasoconscriction). This decreases the blood flow near the surface of the skin so less heat is lost through radiation.

When body temperature is too high, the capillaries dilate (vasodilation), which increases blood flow near the surface of the skin and so more heat is lost through radiation.

The control of body temperature as well as other factors such as blood CO2 concentration, or blood glucose concetration is part of a biological mechanism called homeostasis. 

Blood vessels have the ability to dilate and constrict to control body temperatre. 

When body temperature is too low, the tiny blood vessels near the surface of the skin (capillaries) constrict (vasoconscriction). This decreases the blood flow near the surface of the skin so less heat is lost through radiation.

When body temperature is too high, the capillaries dilate (vasodilation), which increases blood flow near the surface of the skin and so more heat is lost through radiation.

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2 years ago

3663 views

Simplify (x^2-9)/2x^2+5x-3

To simplify this equation we need factorize both quadratic equations into brackets, so we can then cancel out terms on both the denominator and numerator.

For the first euqation: x2-9, there is no x value so when we split the quadratic equation into 2 brackets we know our values must add up to 0. As it is x2 we know that each bracket has an x.

(x   )(x   ), becuase there is a minus sign we can deduce that one of the brackets must have a negative sign. Therefore as 9 is a square number we can deduce that it is (x-3)(x+3).

For the second quadratic there is a 2x2 so we know that there must be a 2x and an x in each bracket, (2x   )(x   ). We must then think of 2 values that times together to make -3. We know that one of our values must be neative and one positive in order to make -3. (2 negatives or 2 positives would both make a positive). Values we may have are: -1,3 or 1,-3.

Therefore by methods of trial and error our second qudratic is: (2x-1)(x+3)

We can then put both factorised quadratics back into the original equation and cancel out an brackets that are the same:

(x-3)(x+3)

(2x-1)(x+3)

We can see that (x+3) is common on both the numerator and denominator so it can be cancelled out. Therfore our simplified equation is:

x-3

2x-1

To simplify this equation we need factorize both quadratic equations into brackets, so we can then cancel out terms on both the denominator and numerator.

For the first euqation: x2-9, there is no x value so when we split the quadratic equation into 2 brackets we know our values must add up to 0. As it is x2 we know that each bracket has an x.

(x   )(x   ), becuase there is a minus sign we can deduce that one of the brackets must have a negative sign. Therefore as 9 is a square number we can deduce that it is (x-3)(x+3).

For the second quadratic there is a 2x2 so we know that there must be a 2x and an x in each bracket, (2x   )(x   ). We must then think of 2 values that times together to make -3. We know that one of our values must be neative and one positive in order to make -3. (2 negatives or 2 positives would both make a positive). Values we may have are: -1,3 or 1,-3.

Therefore by methods of trial and error our second qudratic is: (2x-1)(x+3)

We can then put both factorised quadratics back into the original equation and cancel out an brackets that are the same:

(x-3)(x+3)

(2x-1)(x+3)

We can see that (x+3) is common on both the numerator and denominator so it can be cancelled out. Therfore our simplified equation is:

x-3

2x-1

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2 years ago

3897 views

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