Daniel E. Uni Admissions Test .TSA. Oxford. tutor, A Level Economics ...

Daniel E.

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Degree: PPE (Philosophy, Politics and Economics) (Bachelors) - Oxford, Lincoln College University

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About me

About me

Hi, my name is Dan and I'm studying PPE (Philosophy, Politics and Economics) at Oxford University. At school, I did Cambridge Pre Us and attained D1s (A*+ equivalent at A-Level) in Maths, Economics and Russian and a D2 (A* equivalent at A-Level) in Further Maths (here is a link to the Pre U website for details of grade conversions: http://www.cie.org.uk/images/121798-cambridge-pre-u-guide-for-framing-offers.pdf).

I feel very lucky to have been taught by some excellent teachers and I am instinctively drawn towards tutoring by the desire to help others find that inspiration to truly engage with their subjects. I have enjoyed gaining experience of working in education through volunteering as a classroom assistant in two local schools, as well as coaching several sports. 

Maths and Economics form a large part of my course and I have enjoyed studying them immensely. I found being tutored before my exams extremely helpful, since they are both technical subjects which require thorough understanding rather than simply the regurgitation of facts.

The Lessons

In order to get the most out of our lessons, you will be able to guide them by specifying the areas which are most relevant to you. It is important that you ask for clarification on any topic where you have doubts, and never write off a question as too stupid to ask, since they are often the most important ones!

Having experienced the stress of university admissions myself, I understand how complex and overwhelming the process can seem, so I also feel well placed to offer advice on preparation for Oxbridge applications. Whether it concerns personal statements, the TSA aptitude test or interviews, I am keen to pass on key tips and techniques to bypass any potential pitfalls.

Getting in touch

If you are interested in arranging a free meeting with me, or just want to ask any questions, I would be very pleased to hear from you.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Economics A Level £20 /hr
Maths A Level £20 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr
.TSA. Oxford. Uni Admissions Test £25 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
EconomicsA-LevelD1/A*+
MathematicsA-LevelD1/A*+
Further MathematicsA-LevelD2/A*
RussianA-LevelD1/A*+
TSA OxfordUni Admissions Test73.2
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable:

Ratings and reviews

5from 1 customer review

Mandy (Parent) July 17 2016

Questions Daniel has answered

What is the best market structure?

In Economics, we tend to think of "best" as synonymous with "most efficient." There are many different types of efficiency, but the most important of them are allocative and productive efficiency, since they indicate the degree to which goods and services are produced and sold at the lowest po...

In Economics, we tend to think of "best" as synonymous with "most efficient." There are many different types of efficiency, but the most important of them are allocative and productive efficiency, since they indicate the degree to which goods and services are produced and sold at the lowest possible price. Intuitively, perfectly competitive markets seem the best equipped to manage this, since, in the long run, the absence of firms with market power and the availability of perfect information mean that price equals marginal cost (the condition for allocative efficiency) and production is capped at the point where average total cost is at its lowest (the condition for productive efficiency). However, the assumptions of perfect competition, such as perfect information and complete absence of barriers to entry, are unrealistic. Furthermore, whilst monopolistic markets are neither allocatively nor productively efficient, their firms often benefit from economies of scale, since their privileged positions allow them to increase their size. This can shift their cost curves downwards, allowing them to produce and sell their product at lower prices than their perfectly competitive counterparts. Therefore, whilst monopolistic markets remain allocatively and productively inefficient in absolute terms, they can be relatively more efficient than others, if they take advantage of their economies of scale. (I would only target this at a fairly advanced student, as it is higher level analysis / evaluation.) 

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1 year ago

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