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About me

Hi there! I'm Charlie and I'm studying Natural Sciences at Durham University, specialising in Chemistry and Earth Sciences. At A Level I got 3 A*s in Chemistry, Geography and Maths from Bedford Modern School and at GSCE I have 12 A* grades (though I'm certain they got the French grade wrong!).

I'm super keen about all things Chemistry and Geography, so if you have any trouble with these subjects, please feel free to contact me! I also had to write 2 personal statements for my University application (one for Durham and one for all 4 other Unis!) so I'm well practised at all things UCAS!

In my spare time I love dance, playing pretty much every sport and going on field trips (like all die-hard geography fans!). 

I may have good grades but I'm very approachable and I can guarantee that I struggled with something similar to you during my time at school, but managed to work through the issue then. Please don't hesitate to contact me if you think that I can help. I got my grades through hard work, so I'm sure that's all it takes to get you those As and A*s!

I can tutor:

A Level Chemistry (OCR) and Geography (Edexcel)

GCSE Chemistry (AQA) and Geography (Edexcel)

Personal Statement writing (particularly those wanting to study science based courses at Uni- especially if you want to study at Durham!)

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Chemistry A Level £24 /hr
Geography A Level £24 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £22 /hr
Geography GCSE £22 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
ChemistryA-LevelA*
MathsA-LevelA*
GeographyA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

13/09/2013

General Availability

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Please get in touch for more detailed availability

Ratings and reviews

5from 30 customer reviews

Sara (Parent) November 12 2016

always excellent

Sara (Parent) October 30 2016

excellent

Sara (Parent) October 16 2016

Excellent in all respects

Nikki (Parent) August 18 2016

Charlotte is a fantastic tutor. Really committed, reliable, friendly and very clear and knows her subject very well. My son has really benefited from her sessions and has gone into year 13 confident and well prepared.
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Questions Charlotte has answered

Contrast the housing found in the "Inner City" region of a British town to the housing found in the "Suburbs"\? (GCSE Question)

Houses in the Inner City were normally built in the Victorian era/ pre WW1 and so reflect the requirements of housing at these times. They are normally terraced houses located on long, straight roads in a grid system, with small gardens so to fit as many houses as possible into a small space. ...

Houses in the Inner City were normally built in the Victorian era/ pre WW1 and so reflect the requirements of housing at these times. They are normally terraced houses located on long, straight roads in a grid system, with small gardens so to fit as many houses as possible into a small space. In most cases, these houses will open straight out onto the pavement, with minimal front gardens. Houses could be 3 or even 4 stories tall, so to accomodate multiple families during the rural-urban migrations occuring during the industrial revolution.

In contrast, suburbian housing was built post- WW2 up to the present day, where requirements were very different. 2 story, detached and semi-detached houses were more fashionable at these times as people searched for a "happy medium" between city and country. As such, suburban houses are more widely spaced, with larger gardens, parks nearby and wider streets (usually with "closes" and dead-end roads). Houses are normally larger (though not universally so) but most certainly have larger rooms. Driveways and garages allow for greater car-ownership during this period. 

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1 year ago

320 views

How do CFC's damage the Ozone Layer?

CFC's (Chloroflourocarbons) are pretty inert at ground level, but can harm the Ozone layer in the Stratosphere by catalysing it's destruction. In the first stage, a CFC reacts with UV radiation to form a Chlorine Radical (which has an unpaired electron). CCl2F2 + UV --> CClF2 + Cl*  In the s...

CFC's (Chloroflourocarbons) are pretty inert at ground level, but can harm the Ozone layer in the Stratosphere by catalysing it's destruction.

In the first stage, a CFC reacts with UV radiation to form a Chlorine Radical (which has an unpaired electron).

CCl2F2 + UV --> CClF+ Cl* 

In the second stage, that Chlorine Radical reacts with Ozone to produce Oxygen Gas and Chlorine Oxide.

Cl* + O--> O2 + *ClO

This is the actual destruction of Ozone. However the real problems are caused by the next stage.

In stage 3, ClO reacts with an Oxygen radical to produce more Oxygen gas and the initial Chlorine Radical.

*ClO + *O* --> O2 + Cl*

OR/ 

It reacts with Ozone (it just depends on which it happens to collide with in the atmosphere). The Chlorine Radical is still reformed this way.

*ClO +O3 --> 2O2 + Cl*

As you can see, the Clorine Radical doing all the damage is regenerated. This means that one CFC molecules can destroy lots of Ozone and this is why the issue is so vast.

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1 year ago

301 views

How is the structure of Sodium Chloride different to that of Diamond?

Sodium Chloride is an ionic compound which, when formed, exists as a 3D giant "cube based" ionic lattice with 6-6 coordination. In this lattice, each sodium ion (positive ion) is surrounded by 6 chlorine ions (negative ions) to which it is ionically bonded. The sodium ion is attracted to the c...

Sodium Chloride is an ionic compound which, when formed, exists as a 3D giant "cube based" ionic lattice with 6-6 coordination. In this lattice, each sodium ion (positive ion) is surrounded by 6 chlorine ions (negative ions) to which it is ionically bonded. The sodium ion is attracted to the chlorine ion by electrostatic forces (caused by opposing charges).

In contrast, Diamond is a covalently bonded form of Carbon in the form of a 3D giant tetrahedral covalent structure. Each carbon atom is covalently bonded to 4 other carbon atoms and there are no charges or ions. The covalent bonds are formed by the donation of an electron from each atom to form a pair of electrons. These electrons are attracted to the positive nuclei of both bonding atoms, holding them together. 

So in conclusion:

Sodium Chloride is: an IONIC LATTICE, based around a series of CUBES, with 2 DIFFERENT ELEMENTS- Sodium and Chlorine. Each ion is bonded to 6 others.

Diamond is: a COVALENT LATTICE, based around a TETRAHEDRAL STRUCTURE, with only 1 ELEMENT involved (Carbon). Each atom is bonded to 4 others.

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1 year ago

362 views
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