Steven K. GCSE Maths tutor, A Level Maths tutor, Mentoring -Personal ...

Steven K.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Material Science (Masters) - Oxford, The Queen's College University

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About me

I started tutoring through my father who is a maths teacher, as he would pass on requests for lessons to me. Through my A levels I tutored GCSE maths, and began to also teach physics, chemistry and biology, the other subjects i was studying. I have now been tutoring for over 2 years, and as i am now studying Material Engineering at Oxford, I came to My tutor as a way to keep my teaching online as it's something i really enjoy.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Maths A Level £20 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathsA-LevelA*
BiologyA-LevelA*
PhysicsA-LevelA*
ChemistryA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

General Availability

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Ratings and reviews

5from 3 customer reviews

Peter (Parent) March 17 2016

Good teaching style - nicely executed.

Patricia (Parent) January 23 2016

Another excellent turorial thank you

Patricia (Parent) January 20 2016

I was extremely pleased with my first tutorial with Steven K His teaching was clear, at the right pace and with the right amount of praise and encouragement. I would like to continue lessons with this tutor

Questions Steven has answered

how do you find the original price of something that has been changed by a percentage decrease

Lets say something has been decreased in price by 20% and is now £40. The tempting thing to do here is to find 20% of 40 and add it back on, but this is not okay! The reason we can't do this is that 20% of 40 is different to 20% of the original, bigger number. Instead, think of our original nu...

Lets say something has been decreased in price by 20% and is now £40. The tempting thing to do here is to find 20% of 40 and add it back on, but this is not okay! The reason we can't do this is that 20% of 40 is different to 20% of the original, bigger number. Instead, think of our original number as 100%. We took away 20% so now we have 80% left, how can we get back? well, if we divide 80% by 4 we get 20%, then multiply it by 5 we get 100%! Do the same to the £40, which is our 80%, and you will get back to the original. I like to draw a grid

80% = £40

divide by 4

20% = £10

multiply by five

100% = £50

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1 year ago

420 views

What's the difference between ionic and covalent bonds?

First, let's think about what atoms even bond together. The 'aim' for every atom is to get a full outer shell of electrons, that means two if it's the first shell or eight if it's any other. Ionic and covalent bonds are just two ways in which atoms can work together to achieve this. For ionic,...

First, let's think about what atoms even bond together. The 'aim' for every atom is to get a full outer shell of electrons, that means two if it's the first shell or eight if it's any other. Ionic and covalent bonds are just two ways in which atoms can work together to achieve this. For ionic, one atom which has a small number of extra electrons on it's outer shell, gives one or two electrons to a different atom which is missing one or two on it's outer shell. Since electrons have a negative charge, this leaves the first positively charged and the second negative, so they attract to eachother forming an electrostatic bond. In a covalent bond, two atoms with just less than 8 electrons 'agree' to share a few electrons in order to increase their overall number of electrons. These shared electrons are attracted to the neclei of both atoms, leaving the atoms bonded together

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1 year ago

392 views

Why do we need active transport if we have Diffusion?

Diffusion is very useful when it comes to the movement of molecules down a diffusion gradient. That means from somewhere of a high concentration, so where there's lots of molecules in a given space, to somewhere of a low concentration, so the opposite. Imagine you just ate a huge meal. There a...Diffusion is very useful when it comes to the movement of molecules down a diffusion gradient. That means from somewhere of a high concentration, so where there's lots of molecules in a given space, to somewhere of a low concentration, so the opposite. Imagine you just ate a huge meal. There are loads of glucose molecules in your intestines, but in your cell walls there's very few, so the glucose can diffuse down the concentration gradient, from your intestines to your cell walls and hence your blood. However as this happens, the concentration in your cell walls increases and the concentration in intestines decreases, until they are even... But only half the glucose has been absorbed, half is still in your intestines! in order to absorb the rest, we need to work against the concentration gradient. Active transport can continue to bring glucose into the cell wall even when the concentration in the small intestine is lower, so it can work against the concentration gradient and allow the rest of the glucose to be absorbed. see more

1 year ago

701 views
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