Kilda C. GCSE Chemistry tutor, GCSE Biology tutor, GCSE Maths tutor, ...
£18 - £20 /hr

Kilda C.

Degree: Medicine (Bachelors) - Oxford, New College University

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About me

Hello! I'm Kilda, I come from Belgium and I'm about to start my third year reading Medicine at the University of Oxford.

I have been tutoring Science, Maths, Piano and Music Theory since 2011. When I am tutoring, or trying to learn something myself, I always try to use not just a verbal explanation of the facts, but also diagrams and short-answer questions.I find this is the best way not only to memorise concepts, but also to fully understand them.

I am happy to help with GCSE Biology, Chemistry, Maths, Physics and French, and can also offer guidance to anyone thinking of applying to study Medicine. This could include practice inteviews, help with BMAT questions, advice on your personal statement or anything else you might find useful!

Please feel free to get in touch if you have any questions, I look forward to hearing from you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Biology GCSE £18 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Physics GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
EnglishBaccalaureate9.15
FrenchBaccalaureate9.28
Philosophy Baccalaureate9.20
MathsBaccalaureate9.10
HIstoryBaccalaureate9.36
GeographyBaccalaureate8.25
SportBaccalaureate8.28
PhysicsBaccalaureate9.12
BiologyBaccalaureate9.32
Lab BiologyBaccalaureate8.33
ChemistryBaccalaureate9.45
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

General Availability

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Ratings and reviews

5from 5 customer reviews

Ben (Student) October 12 2016

Lovely tutor, patient and very helpful in her teaching style.

Ben (Student) September 21 2016

An excellent tutor lovely personality and good methods :)

Ben (Parent) October 12 2016

Ben (Parent) September 5 2016

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Questions Kilda has answered

How are action potentials transmitted?

Information passes through nerves rapidly in the form of action potentials, or transient changes in voltage across the nerve cell membrane. Nerve cells, or neurons, are able to transmit action potentials thanks to specific ion channels in their membranes. At rest, the voltage across the membra...

Information passes through nerves rapidly in the form of action potentials, or transient changes in voltage across the nerve cell membrane. Nerve cells, or neurons, are able to transmit action potentials thanks to specific ion channels in their membranes. At rest, the voltage across the membrane, or 'resting potential', is close to -70mV. At the start of an action potential, sodium channels in the membrane open, and positively charged sodium ions flow into the neuron, depolarising the membrane by driving the potential up to 30mV or higher. Slower-opening potassium channels allow potassium ions to flow out of the neuron, driven by the increase in charge inside due to the buildup of sodium. The efflux of potassium decreases membrane potential (hyperpolarises) to slightly below resting potential, reffered to as an 'overshoot'. Finally, resting potential is restored by the sodium-potassium pump, which uses energy from the breakdown of ATP to exchange sodium inside the cell for potassium outside. This sequence of events continues along the neuron axon as depolarisation of one segment causes sodium channels to open in the adjacent segment and the process to restart.

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5 months ago

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How are single-gene disorders inherited?

Most of our characteristics are encoded by a pair of alleles. These are different forms of the same gene, one inherited from the father and one from the mother. Inheriting a mutated allele can lead to disease in one of two ways. In 'dominant' diseases, such as Huntington's chorea, only one mut...

Most of our characteristics are encoded by a pair of alleles. These are different forms of the same gene, one inherited from the father and one from the mother. Inheriting a mutated allele can lead to disease in one of two ways. In 'dominant' diseases, such as Huntington's chorea, only one mutant allele need be inherited for the disease to develop. In 'recessive' diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, a person must inherit two mutant alleles, one from each parent, to be affected. Genetic counsellors commonly use Punnett squares to determine the probability that a given pregnancy will result in a child with a single-gene disorder. This involves drawing up all the possible combinations of the parents' alleles, and calculating the percentage or ratio of children which would be affected. A subset of single-gene disorders are said to be X-linked, as the alleles responsible are encoded on the X-chromosome. An interesting consequence of this is that although an X-linked disease may be classed as recessive, a boy can inherit only one mutant allele and still develop disease, as he has no second X-chromosome containing a healthy allele to offset the effects of the mutant one.

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5 months ago

183 views
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