Chloe E.

Chloe E.

£18 - £25 /hr

English Literature (Bachelors) - Durham University

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12 completed lessons

About me

Hi, I'm Chloe and I'm studying English Literature at Durham. Having just completed my A Levels I know exactly how stressful uni applications and exam periods are and am here to help in these trying times! Growing up in Dubai, I found myself surrounded by a melting pot of different people, all with different backgrounds, cultures and stories. Two of the subjects I found to be the most rewarding were English and History. With these subjects, it wasn't just that my peers and I were able to meet on the same level, connecting over a shared subject, but it was also what other people brought to the table - experiences and interpretations that I had never considered before - impressions that often exceeded or occasionally challenged my own thought process. I look forward to giving you a taste of this and as we progress and I'm excited for you to introduce me to your thoughts as well!


Though A Levels were strenuous and at times I felt unbridling hatred towards coursework, when I look back I do feel the experience was a wholly positive one because the subjects I studied helped me realise the validity of what I had to say. I hope that when you look back on your academic experience you'll feel the same.


Hi, I'm Chloe and I'm studying English Literature at Durham. Having just completed my A Levels I know exactly how stressful uni applications and exam periods are and am here to help in these trying times! Growing up in Dubai, I found myself surrounded by a melting pot of different people, all with different backgrounds, cultures and stories. Two of the subjects I found to be the most rewarding were English and History. With these subjects, it wasn't just that my peers and I were able to meet on the same level, connecting over a shared subject, but it was also what other people brought to the table - experiences and interpretations that I had never considered before - impressions that often exceeded or occasionally challenged my own thought process. I look forward to giving you a taste of this and as we progress and I'm excited for you to introduce me to your thoughts as well!


Though A Levels were strenuous and at times I felt unbridling hatred towards coursework, when I look back I do feel the experience was a wholly positive one because the subjects I studied helped me realise the validity of what I had to say. I hope that when you look back on your academic experience you'll feel the same.


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About my sessions

A new student means a pair of fresh eyes on board, and this is exactly how I approach my lessons - I'm here and I'm interested in what you have to say! Our sessions broadly speaking will be in a tutorial style format: for each session I'll allocate a specific topic, we'll do a non-exam based starter question and have a casual chat, and then move on to specific analysis or exam. For English this could look something like, "Do you think Othello is likeable?" and later, "What are some authorial methods Shakespeare uses to convey Othello's pride." For History this could be, "Are revolutions a slow or rapid event?" and then, "How would you structure an essay about Charles I's problems in 1642?". 


Whether it be tackling exam technique - such as how to approach extract questions (i.e. Examine this extract in relation to the rest of the play as a whole); content based learning, where we run through the spec (i.e. Help, I completely don't

understand the English Restoration period!); or how to approach coursework, my goal is to imbue YOU with the confidence to apply your opinions to paper, not to memorise lines of quirky analysis. 



A new student means a pair of fresh eyes on board, and this is exactly how I approach my lessons - I'm here and I'm interested in what you have to say! Our sessions broadly speaking will be in a tutorial style format: for each session I'll allocate a specific topic, we'll do a non-exam based starter question and have a casual chat, and then move on to specific analysis or exam. For English this could look something like, "Do you think Othello is likeable?" and later, "What are some authorial methods Shakespeare uses to convey Othello's pride." For History this could be, "Are revolutions a slow or rapid event?" and then, "How would you structure an essay about Charles I's problems in 1642?". 


Whether it be tackling exam technique - such as how to approach extract questions (i.e. Examine this extract in relation to the rest of the play as a whole); content based learning, where we run through the spec (i.e. Help, I completely don't

understand the English Restoration period!); or how to approach coursework, my goal is to imbue YOU with the confidence to apply your opinions to paper, not to memorise lines of quirky analysis. 



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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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20/11/2018

Ratings & Reviews

5
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2 customer reviews
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★ 1
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PA
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Pirzada Parent from Stalybridge Lesson review 6 Dec, 16:30

6 Dec

Brill. As Usual.

PA
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Pirzada Parent from Stalybridge Lesson review 22 Nov, 16:00

22 Nov

Brilliant and thorough analysis of exam technique. She gave a detailed breakdown of what every exam essay should include in, order to get the top grades.

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
English LiteratureA-level (A2)A*
HistoryA-level (A2)A*
MathsA-level (A2)A
Extended Project QualificationA-level (A2)A*

General Availability

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Pre 12pm
12 - 5pm
After 5pm

Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
English LiteratureA Level£20 /hr
Extended Project QualificationA Level£20 /hr
English LiteratureGCSE£18 /hr
HistoryGCSE£18 /hr
ELATUniversity£25 /hr

Questions Chloe has answered

Explore the significance of this extract in relation to the tragedy of the play as a whole. (Act 1, Scene 2 of Othello)

Firstly make sure you read the extract. Once initially, just to understand the scene and then again with a pen or a highlighter to underline bits you plan on using in your essay. Take about 5 minutes to annotate and then another 5 to make a plan of your answer, you should think about making 3 or 4 points in your essay with a paragraph dedicated to each of these.There are two requirements to nail extract questions, and though they sound deceptively simple, a lot of candidates often forget them!1. Use the extract. This means quotation, quotation, quotation. Every point you make should be backed up with a quote, you should be prepared to show the examiner your ability to decipher and selectively choose essential components of the extract. Quotes should be integrated seamlessly into your point, and you can use the form of PEA (Point, Evaluation, Analysis) to structure your sentences. 2. Answer the question!It might seem silly but a lot of candidates will forget to direct their answer towards the question. If the extract is asking you to examine it in relation to tragedy, then make sure you use tragic terms – i.e. the tragic hero, catharsis, anagnorisis, peripeteia, hubris, etc. You need to show the examiner you have a firm understanding of both the text, but also the genre as a whole, remember the exam is an exam about the genre, and how the given text subscribes to this. For example if the extract was Act 1 Scene 2 of Othello and you had to explore it in relation to the tragedy of the play as a wholeone of the points could be: "In regard to the tragic hero, the extract is of significance due to its portrayal of Othello, particularly so in regard to his nobility. Shakespeare creates an articulate and measured character, able to eloquently express himself through declarations of “Let him do his spite” and “My services […] Shall out-tongue his complaints.” Highlighting his poise, an elevation of status can be seen in Othello’s confidence, holding himself to his duty as General, a rank of great prestige in the military context of the play."Firstly make sure you read the extract. Once initially, just to understand the scene and then again with a pen or a highlighter to underline bits you plan on using in your essay. Take about 5 minutes to annotate and then another 5 to make a plan of your answer, you should think about making 3 or 4 points in your essay with a paragraph dedicated to each of these.There are two requirements to nail extract questions, and though they sound deceptively simple, a lot of candidates often forget them!1. Use the extract. This means quotation, quotation, quotation. Every point you make should be backed up with a quote, you should be prepared to show the examiner your ability to decipher and selectively choose essential components of the extract. Quotes should be integrated seamlessly into your point, and you can use the form of PEA (Point, Evaluation, Analysis) to structure your sentences. 2. Answer the question!It might seem silly but a lot of candidates will forget to direct their answer towards the question. If the extract is asking you to examine it in relation to tragedy, then make sure you use tragic terms – i.e. the tragic hero, catharsis, anagnorisis, peripeteia, hubris, etc. You need to show the examiner you have a firm understanding of both the text, but also the genre as a whole, remember the exam is an exam about the genre, and how the given text subscribes to this. For example if the extract was Act 1 Scene 2 of Othello and you had to explore it in relation to the tragedy of the play as a wholeone of the points could be: "In regard to the tragic hero, the extract is of significance due to its portrayal of Othello, particularly so in regard to his nobility. Shakespeare creates an articulate and measured character, able to eloquently express himself through declarations of “Let him do his spite” and “My services […] Shall out-tongue his complaints.” Highlighting his poise, an elevation of status can be seen in Othello’s confidence, holding himself to his duty as General, a rank of great prestige in the military context of the play."

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1 month ago

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What problems did the Weimar government face in 1919-1923?

From the onset of it’s creation, the Weimar Republic already suffered from a host of problems. The very admittance of a Republic angered a lot of Germans who were still loyal to the the previous rule of the Kaiserreich - seeing Ebert’s new government as illegitimate. Ebert, as the President of the Weimar Republic represented the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD) - a party of the left that was often attributed to the failures of WWI, according to the ‘stab in the back’ policy created by conservative parties such as the National People’s Party (DNVP), blaming socialists and Jews for German defeat. What Germany faced was a large proportion of resentful, nationalist German people, with the DNVP winning 10.3% of the election vote in January 1919. Much of the angry disillusioned population that Ebert faced were ex-army men and soldiers too young to serve in the army: an infamous group that became known as the Freikorps. Where the government faced resentment from the right, this was also present on the left as seen in the January 1919 Spartacus Uprising. This uprising started as a protest against the removal of left-wing government officials but became seized by the Communist Party (KPD) who began occupying buildings in Berlin, imitating the 1918 Russian Revolution. To quell the liberal threat, the government used the Freikorps to restore order, brutally crushing the revolution and arresting, torturing and murdering Luxemburg and Liebknecht, leaders of the KPD. Yet in temporarily shutting down the left the government was faced with a new problem - the growing violence of militarily styled right wing associations. During 13-17 of March 1920, Dr Wolfgang Kapp led a Freikorps takeover in Berlin. The regular army refused to attack the Freikorps, and the takeover was only defeated when workers of Berlin went on strike. Despite their disbandment, conservative resentment only grew, and particularly towards the end of Weimar and rise of the Nazis can we see this to truly topple the German government. In addition, economically Weimar Germany was in decline. In 1923 the German government was unable to pay the reparations required by the Treaty of Versailles. In response the French and Belgian governments sent troops to the Ruhr (the heart of Germany’s coal, iron and steel production) and cut it off from Germany, expelling trade union leaders, civil servants and government officials. As an incredibly industrial based economy this was a huge blow to German employment, leading to massive unemployment and increased striking workers. In attempt to combat this the government printed more money but this resulted in a hyperinflation crisis that crippled the middle classes, ex-soldiers and elderly who had savings and were dependent on pensions.From the onset of it’s creation, the Weimar Republic already suffered from a host of problems. The very admittance of a Republic angered a lot of Germans who were still loyal to the the previous rule of the Kaiserreich - seeing Ebert’s new government as illegitimate. Ebert, as the President of the Weimar Republic represented the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD) - a party of the left that was often attributed to the failures of WWI, according to the ‘stab in the back’ policy created by conservative parties such as the National People’s Party (DNVP), blaming socialists and Jews for German defeat. What Germany faced was a large proportion of resentful, nationalist German people, with the DNVP winning 10.3% of the election vote in January 1919. Much of the angry disillusioned population that Ebert faced were ex-army men and soldiers too young to serve in the army: an infamous group that became known as the Freikorps. Where the government faced resentment from the right, this was also present on the left as seen in the January 1919 Spartacus Uprising. This uprising started as a protest against the removal of left-wing government officials but became seized by the Communist Party (KPD) who began occupying buildings in Berlin, imitating the 1918 Russian Revolution. To quell the liberal threat, the government used the Freikorps to restore order, brutally crushing the revolution and arresting, torturing and murdering Luxemburg and Liebknecht, leaders of the KPD. Yet in temporarily shutting down the left the government was faced with a new problem - the growing violence of militarily styled right wing associations. During 13-17 of March 1920, Dr Wolfgang Kapp led a Freikorps takeover in Berlin. The regular army refused to attack the Freikorps, and the takeover was only defeated when workers of Berlin went on strike. Despite their disbandment, conservative resentment only grew, and particularly towards the end of Weimar and rise of the Nazis can we see this to truly topple the German government. In addition, economically Weimar Germany was in decline. In 1923 the German government was unable to pay the reparations required by the Treaty of Versailles. In response the French and Belgian governments sent troops to the Ruhr (the heart of Germany’s coal, iron and steel production) and cut it off from Germany, expelling trade union leaders, civil servants and government officials. As an incredibly industrial based economy this was a huge blow to German employment, leading to massive unemployment and increased striking workers. In attempt to combat this the government printed more money but this resulted in a hyperinflation crisis that crippled the middle classes, ex-soldiers and elderly who had savings and were dependent on pensions.

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1 month ago

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