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Simon C.

Degree: Modern Languages and Cultures (Bachelors) - Durham University

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About me

Bilingual Durham undergraduate looking to help students with Spanish, Personal Statements, French, History, RS and MLAT performance.

About Me

Hi, I’m Simon and am currently a second year student at Durham University, studying Spanish, French and Italian. In addition to Spanish and French I also did RS and History at A Level, and have a very good knowledge of the syllabus of all 4 subjects at GCSE and A level. I am bilingual in English and Spanish, giving me an advantage as a Spanish tutor, particularly when working on preparation for your oral exam.

Spanish

I am a native Spanish speaker; I started speaking Spanish before English! For this reason I like to focus on speaking as much Spanish as possible in tutorials; this is key to develop the necessary skills for the Speaking and Listening aspects of both GCSE and A Level exams. I also enjoy the reading and writing side of Spanish, and have constructed many useful revision sheets and notes to help with grammar, key words and phrases, and accents. I already have experience teaching GCSE Spanish and being involved in conversation classes while at school.

French

I have been learning French since the age of 7 and have been to France on numerous exchanges. My specialist aspects of French GCSE and A Level are speaking, reading, listening and GCSE/AS writing sections. I feel it is important to practice speaking and listening to French in order to best prepare yourself for the exam; in my tutorials I would aim to expose the student to as much French as possible, whether it be through conversation, reading or commenting on a video.

Religious Studies

I studied RS for both GCSE and A Level, achieving A* in both. As a result I know the specification and syllabus very well. I would be especially helpful for working on writing essays in RS, and how to structure a consistent argument. At both GCSE and A Level it is important to consider multiple points of view; I feel that I am very well placed to help with this, having already studied the course. Discussions about different topics are crucial in RS, and I would hope to incorporate this into our sessions.

History

My specialist subjects in History are Weimar and Nazi Germany, Terrorism, US Civil Rights and English history in the years 1625-1689 (Charles I to the Glorious Revolution). If you need help specifically with these topics, then I would be very glad to help out with essay content and structure, and revision notes. More generally, I can help with working out an essay structure that you can use for your exam and giving advice for how to start your coursework at GCSE and A Level.

Personal Statement

Having recently gone through the process myself , I certainly know how stressful writing a good Personal Statement can be. I can help with Oxbridge applications, having spent many weeks focusing on personal statement writing. The key to writing a successful Personal Statement is to focus on what experiences have inspired you to take that subject at degree level, and why you specifically would be an ideal candidate for that university. I aim to help you structure a Personal Statement that is going to give you the best possible chance of getting into your first choice university.

MLAT

Having done the MLAT two years ago in Spanish, I know what is expected and the language/grammar you need to know in order to have a successful MLAT. I scored in the top quartile in last year’s exam, so certainly know what is needed to achieve a top mark. I can also help with information of the Oxford application process and what to expect at interviews, as well as giving Personal Statement advice.

What Now?

I am very happy to answer any questions you have about me and what I can offer in a tutoring session. You can get in touch with me by booking a free ‘meet the tutor session’, in which we can discuss what the focus of the lessons would be and also answer any questions you might have.

 I look forward to hearing from you soon!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
French A Level £22 /hr
Religious Studies A Level £22 /hr
Spanish A Level £22 /hr
French GCSE £20 /hr
History GCSE £20 /hr
Religious Studies GCSE £20 /hr
Spanish GCSE £20 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £22 /hr
.MLAT (Modern Languages) Uni Admissions Test £25 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
SpanishA-LevelA*
FrenchA-LevelA
HistoryA-LevelA
RSA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

20/07/2015

General Availability

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Ratings and reviews

4.4from 11 customer reviews

Sarah (Parent) November 5 2016

Simon was great, very confident, kind and knowledgeable about the subject. However, I do find the online tutoring strange due to time delay but overtime I'm sure I will get use to it. Looking forward to my next lesson. Vanessa

Nicola (Parent) October 30 2016

He Is very nice and has a firm grip on the Subject, as well as a good plan.

Jake (Student) January 8 2016

Really helped me get a essay up to scratch, would definitely recommend!

Lily (Parent) December 2 2015

Great lesson. My son said he really enjoyed it. It was informative and fun. Thank you, Simon. Look forward to contacting you in the future.
See all reviews

Questions Simon has answered

How should I prepare myself for my GCSE Oral Exam?

The best long-term advice I can give is that you have got to practice speaking the language as much as possible. Try to organise weekly sessions with teachers/language assistants/online tutors to get used to speaking the language and interacting with someone who is fluent in the language you a...

The best long-term advice I can give is that you have got to practice speaking the language as much as possible. Try to organise weekly sessions with teachers/language assistants/online tutors to get used to speaking the language and interacting with someone who is fluent in the language you are learning. Doing this can only improve your proficiency in the language, and give you confidence for when it comes to the real thing! Ensuring you listen to a lot of that language is also key when you are forced to improvise answers and are put on the spot. The more you are used to hearing the language, the better.

In addition, I have always found that a sheet of notes are perfect as short-term preparation. For GCSE, you tend to know the questions you will be asked and the answers you’re going to give; a few key phrases that you learn off by heart are still very useful, especially in case your examiner asks you a question you haven’t seen before. For example: Sin embargo, Se suele decir que, No obstante, Que yo sepa, Es un tema delicado. These are just some of the phrases that will ensure you stand out in the Oral exam. Take the time to construct a sheet covered in useful words and tips for the exam; it comes in very handy in the days leading up to the exam/before the exam itself.

In summary, I would advise that there are two key ways to prepare for the oral exam. 1)Get as much practice speaking the language as you can. 2)Write down key words/phrases and information that will help you stand out to the examiner; learn as many as you can off by heart.

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1 year ago

314 views

How should I prepare myself for my GCSE/A Level Oral Exam?

The best long-term advice I can give is that you have got to practice speaking the language as much as possible. Try to organise weekly sessions with teachers/language assistants/online tutors to get used to speaking the language and interacting with someone who is fluent in the language you a...

The best long-term advice I can give is that you have got to practice speaking the language as much as possible. Try to organise weekly sessions with teachers/language assistants/online tutors to get used to speaking the language and interacting with someone who is fluent in the language you are learning. Doing this can only improve your proficiency in the language, and give you confidence for when it comes to the real thing! Ensuring you listen to a lot of that language is also key, particularly for A Level when you are forced to improvise answers and are put on the spot. The more you are used to hearing the language, the better.

In addition, I have always found that a sheet of notes are perfect as short-term preparation. For GCSE, you tend to know the questions you will be asked and the answers you’re going to give; a few key phrases that you learn off by heart are still very useful, especially in case your examiner asks you a question you haven’t seen before. For A Level, I would advise a sheet with key words and phrases useful for the debate and questions on chosen topics. For example: Sin embargo, Se suele decir que, No obstante, Que yo sepa, Es un tema delicado. These are just some of the phrases that will ensure you stand out in the Oral exam. Take the time to construct a sheet covered in useful words and tips for the exam; it comes in very handy in the days leading up to the exam/before the exam itself.

In summary, I would advise that there are two key ways to prepare for the oral exam. 1)Get as much practice speaking the language as you can. 2)Write down key words/phrases and information that will help you stand out to the examiner; learn as many as you can off by heart. 

see more

1 year ago

408 views

What are the general accent rules in Spanish?

Words ending in a vowel, ‘n’ or ‘s’ are stressed on the penultimate syllable. Words ending in a consonant (not ending in ‘n’ or ‘s’) are stressed on the last syllable. Words that break these two rules have an accent For example, ‘I ate’ in Spanish is ‘comí’. You need the accent on the ‘i’ as ...

Words ending in a vowel, ‘n’ or ‘s’ are stressed on the penultimate syllable.

Words ending in a consonant (not ending in ‘n’ or ‘s’) are stressed on the last syllable.

Words that break these two rules have an accent

For example, ‘I ate’ in Spanish is ‘comí’. You need the accent on the ‘i’ as the stress is on the last syllable and ‘comí’ ends in a vowel; it therefore breaks the first rule, and needs an accent.   

Similarly, the word ‘estación’ (station) needs an accent on the ‘o’ as the stress is on the last syllable and ‘estación’ ends in an ‘n’; it also breaks the first rule, and needs an accent.

The words ‘lápiz’ and ‘árbol’ both need accents as they both end in a consonant that isn’t ‘n’ or ‘s’, and both aren’t stressed on the last syllable; they therefore break the second rule, and need an accent.

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1 year ago

322 views
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