Charlotte R.

Charlotte R.

£20 - £22 /hr

English Literature (Bachelors) - Exeter University

5.0
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4 reviews

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This tutor is also part of our Schools Programme. They are trusted by teachers to deliver high-quality 1:1 tuition that complements the school curriculum.

10 completed lessons

About me

A bit about me:

I am currently studying English literature at Exeter University, and when I'm not in Exeter I live in London. I love studying English for the variety and freedom of study that it allows, and I would like to help younger students find more enjoyment in the subject as well as improve their essay writing style and exam technique. My favourite texts that I studied at school were Arthur Miller's plays, Hamlet and any 20th Century American literature. As well as English I still have a passion for History, and believe I could help students nail their exam and revision technique to get the best grade possible, especially studying the world wars, Russian history and the Tudors.

I am certainly very dedicated to helping my students as much as I am able to in the areas that they wish to improve.

A bit about me:

I am currently studying English literature at Exeter University, and when I'm not in Exeter I live in London. I love studying English for the variety and freedom of study that it allows, and I would like to help younger students find more enjoyment in the subject as well as improve their essay writing style and exam technique. My favourite texts that I studied at school were Arthur Miller's plays, Hamlet and any 20th Century American literature. As well as English I still have a passion for History, and believe I could help students nail their exam and revision technique to get the best grade possible, especially studying the world wars, Russian history and the Tudors.

I am certainly very dedicated to helping my students as much as I am able to in the areas that they wish to improve.

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About my sessions

I think that the most useful way to deliver a lesson is for the student to let me know in advance the area that they would like to work on, so that I can prepare research and materials and use the time we have most efficiently. I would help students achieve their goals by setting focused aims and working step by step. For instance, to help with writing technique I would work through how I plan an essay in a way that is clear and easy to grasp, which is the basic start to boosting grades in English and History. I also hope that my passion for the subjects helps to motivate students that otherwise do not find these as their favourite subjects.

I can also help with reviewing a student's work and giving feedback on how to improve that is very useful.

I think that the most useful way to deliver a lesson is for the student to let me know in advance the area that they would like to work on, so that I can prepare research and materials and use the time we have most efficiently. I would help students achieve their goals by setting focused aims and working step by step. For instance, to help with writing technique I would work through how I plan an essay in a way that is clear and easy to grasp, which is the basic start to boosting grades in English and History. I also hope that my passion for the subjects helps to motivate students that otherwise do not find these as their favourite subjects.

I can also help with reviewing a student's work and giving feedback on how to improve that is very useful.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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21/06/2017

Ratings & Reviews

5
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4 customer reviews
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Selvarajah Parent from Bristol Lesson review 18 Nov, 14:00

18 Nov

Very kind, helpful and is prepared for the lesson.

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Selvarajah Parent from Bristol Lesson review 8 Dec, 17:30

8 Dec

ST
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Selvarajah Parent from Bristol Lesson review 30 Nov, 20:00

30 Nov

ST
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Selvarajah Parent from Bristol Lesson review 25 Nov, 11:00

25 Nov

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
English LiteratureA-level (A2)A*
HistoryA-level (A2)A
EconomicsA-level (A2)A*

General Availability

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Pre 12pm
12 - 5pm
After 5pm

Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
EnglishA Level£22 /hr
EnglishGCSE£20 /hr
HistoryGCSE£20 /hr
English13 Plus£20 /hr
History13 Plus£20 /hr
English11 Plus£20 /hr

Questions Charlotte has answered

Consider how Miller dramatically presents his view of “The American Dream”.

Point 1: Portrayal of the American DreamWilly's character emphasises the idea that through hard work and being well-liked, a man can achieve anything. He says that this is 'the wonder of this country, that a man can end with diamonds here on the basis of being liked'. This faith in America being a place where anyone can become rich is what drives Willy- and he also teaches his sons these same principles, placing his hope in their success; more specifically Biff. He reminds his son 'you got all kinds of greatness', suggesting his faith in his son and that he will succeed in a way that is special. Whilst the Loman parents focus their attention mainly on Biff, the more reluctant son, it seems that their other son Happy is more likely to meet this dream and holds many of the same principles as his father. After Willy dies, Happy says that 'he had a good dream. It's the only dream you can have- to come out number-one man'. This creates further emphasis of a grand dream, and one that Happy is honoured to continue, believing that to be better than your neighbours is the best thing to want. Therefore the characters Willy and Happy represent the American ideal. Point 2: Miller contrasts this with the realityIn the opening scene of 'Death of a Salesman', the stage directions describe the set as if 'an air of the dream clings to the place, a dream rising out of reality'. Although this may seem useless to a director or stage manager, this gives an important insight to the atmosphere of the setting. The line suggests a set where people have lived on a dream, where reality is so present but somehow ignored. This is an example of the contrast Miller creates between the created ideals and the realities. Another way in which this is suggested is through the moments when reality creeps into the mind of Willy- the character who seems to be consumed by the idea of the American Dream. Thinking of his son's promise, he exclaims 'a star like that, magnificent, can never really fade away', which alludes to the hope for his invincible seeming success. However, whilst Willy speaks this line, 'the light on Willy is fading', which creates an irony and doubt by his statement on never fading. This lighting is also symbolic of Willy's journey through the play, during which we see him fading from the salesman he used to be to a man without a job who commits suicide to give his son the insurance money. Another way in which Miller portrays this contrast is through the beliefs and dialogue of Willy's family, for instance when Biff exclaims that they had 'been talking in a dream for fifteen years', suggesting they had created what they thought was reality with delusions and lies, ignoring the truth. This places emphasis on the false beliefs that they held. Happy also finds that the things he thought he would need in his life- according to the American ideal, are not what is making him satisfied. He confesses that 'it's what I've always wanted. My own apartment, a car, and plenty of women. And still, goddammit, I'm lonely'. This possession of money, success and love is what he was brought up to strive for, and he seems to be successful, but this is still not enough to fulfill him or make him happy, suggesting that this material wealth is not the correct thing to desire. Even Willy seems to notice the consumerist lifestyle he lives is in some ways claustrophobic, and psychologically suffocating, as he is standing in his yard and complains at 'the way they boxed us in here. Bricks and windows. Windows and bricks'. He feels trapped within his own neighbourhood and home as more and more people are squeezed into apartment blocks around him. The chiasmus used here in particular emphasises how the surroundings are all the same, and overwhelming. Therefore the reality of how this American community lives begins to appear, and it is very different to the happy lifestyle it is imagined to be. Point 1: Portrayal of the American DreamWilly's character emphasises the idea that through hard work and being well-liked, a man can achieve anything. He says that this is 'the wonder of this country, that a man can end with diamonds here on the basis of being liked'. This faith in America being a place where anyone can become rich is what drives Willy- and he also teaches his sons these same principles, placing his hope in their success; more specifically Biff. He reminds his son 'you got all kinds of greatness', suggesting his faith in his son and that he will succeed in a way that is special. Whilst the Loman parents focus their attention mainly on Biff, the more reluctant son, it seems that their other son Happy is more likely to meet this dream and holds many of the same principles as his father. After Willy dies, Happy says that 'he had a good dream. It's the only dream you can have- to come out number-one man'. This creates further emphasis of a grand dream, and one that Happy is honoured to continue, believing that to be better than your neighbours is the best thing to want. Therefore the characters Willy and Happy represent the American ideal. Point 2: Miller contrasts this with the realityIn the opening scene of 'Death of a Salesman', the stage directions describe the set as if 'an air of the dream clings to the place, a dream rising out of reality'. Although this may seem useless to a director or stage manager, this gives an important insight to the atmosphere of the setting. The line suggests a set where people have lived on a dream, where reality is so present but somehow ignored. This is an example of the contrast Miller creates between the created ideals and the realities. Another way in which this is suggested is through the moments when reality creeps into the mind of Willy- the character who seems to be consumed by the idea of the American Dream. Thinking of his son's promise, he exclaims 'a star like that, magnificent, can never really fade away', which alludes to the hope for his invincible seeming success. However, whilst Willy speaks this line, 'the light on Willy is fading', which creates an irony and doubt by his statement on never fading. This lighting is also symbolic of Willy's journey through the play, during which we see him fading from the salesman he used to be to a man without a job who commits suicide to give his son the insurance money. Another way in which Miller portrays this contrast is through the beliefs and dialogue of Willy's family, for instance when Biff exclaims that they had 'been talking in a dream for fifteen years', suggesting they had created what they thought was reality with delusions and lies, ignoring the truth. This places emphasis on the false beliefs that they held. Happy also finds that the things he thought he would need in his life- according to the American ideal, are not what is making him satisfied. He confesses that 'it's what I've always wanted. My own apartment, a car, and plenty of women. And still, goddammit, I'm lonely'. This possession of money, success and love is what he was brought up to strive for, and he seems to be successful, but this is still not enough to fulfill him or make him happy, suggesting that this material wealth is not the correct thing to desire. Even Willy seems to notice the consumerist lifestyle he lives is in some ways claustrophobic, and psychologically suffocating, as he is standing in his yard and complains at 'the way they boxed us in here. Bricks and windows. Windows and bricks'. He feels trapped within his own neighbourhood and home as more and more people are squeezed into apartment blocks around him. The chiasmus used here in particular emphasises how the surroundings are all the same, and overwhelming. Therefore the reality of how this American community lives begins to appear, and it is very different to the happy lifestyle it is imagined to be. 

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1 month ago

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