Jack P.

Jack P.

£36 /hr

English Language and Literature (Bachelors) - St Catherine's College, Oxford University

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About me

I am currently studying at University of Oxford and I really enjoy literature's ability to comment on the society in which it is situated. The variety of forms and medium through which literature operates are really intriguing. I have a particular love for drama and plays, having involved myself in various productions outside of study, so I really do live and breathe literature! I can help you develop your answers outside a class environment that will really help you engage with the texts in the best possible way. I'm also a friendly face, and so I will hopefully help you to really enjoy the literature you're exploring, which itself will aid your writing and get you on track to secure the grades you need. I also have a knowledge of literary theory, and can provide some information on that, in order to really enhance your answers and make them stand out!

I am currently studying at University of Oxford and I really enjoy literature's ability to comment on the society in which it is situated. The variety of forms and medium through which literature operates are really intriguing. I have a particular love for drama and plays, having involved myself in various productions outside of study, so I really do live and breathe literature! I can help you develop your answers outside a class environment that will really help you engage with the texts in the best possible way. I'm also a friendly face, and so I will hopefully help you to really enjoy the literature you're exploring, which itself will aid your writing and get you on track to secure the grades you need. I also have a knowledge of literary theory, and can provide some information on that, in order to really enhance your answers and make them stand out!

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About my sessions

The A-level system is incredibly formulaic and requires a knowledge of how to play the game. In my sessions, I will set out what they are looking for and I will teach a framework that you will be able to apply to most texts, helping to get you the best possible grades. I will need you to send me the texts that you are doing in advance, so that I am able to do some research around them. In some sessions, we will also explore some literary theory to really boost the level of your answers - a skill that not all students will really have. If you have any further questions about my methods, or anything regarding myself, please feel free to contact me.

The A-level system is incredibly formulaic and requires a knowledge of how to play the game. In my sessions, I will set out what they are looking for and I will teach a framework that you will be able to apply to most texts, helping to get you the best possible grades. I will need you to send me the texts that you are doing in advance, so that I am able to do some research around them. In some sessions, we will also explore some literary theory to really boost the level of your answers - a skill that not all students will really have. If you have any further questions about my methods, or anything regarding myself, please feel free to contact me.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
EnglishA-level (A2)A
MathsA-level (A2)A
DramaA-level (A2)A

General Availability

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Pre 12pm
12 - 5pm
After 5pm

Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
EnglishA Level£36 /hr
EnglishGCSE£36 /hr

Questions Jack has answered

'The tragic hero's downfall is a product of their hubris' - To what extent do you agree with this view?

In an Aristotelian definition of tragedy, the tragic hero's downfall is an amalgamation of their hubris, hamartia, and the tragic villain. In Shakespearean tragedy, however, the hamartia is altered to becomes less of an act and more of an inherent character flaw, which is replicated in Miller's tragedy of 'the common man': Death of a Salesman. Willy Loman's downfall is a product of both his hubris and a mistaken belief in the Capitalist American Dream, as defined under the 1940s consumerist culture: the promise of material splendour. Willy believes in an outdated view that an individual must be 'well-liked' and stresses the importance of 'personality' in succeeding financially. However, this is in contention with the doctrine of hard-work promoted in the American Dream that boomed under the development in economic liberalism. Willy's hubris leads him into a state of self-delusion, in which he is unable to accept his failures, believing himself to be 'well liked' and 'vital in New England'. His hubris prevents him from abandoning his mistaken beliefs and leads him into further financial turmoil, for he refuses Charlie's job. This hubris concurrently prevents him from acknowledging the potential offered to him in the pastoral American Dream. The flute motif established at the start symbolises this pastoral American Dream, evident in the description of how it is 'telling of grass and tress and the horizon', which all display the natural imagery aligned with the pastoral. The flute occurs throughout the play, playing even after Willy's death. Miller describes how 'only the music of the flute is left on the darkening stage', which emphasises the sense of loss, in that it outlives Willy and offers the potential that he could have lived, had he adopted the pastoral American Dream. In contrast to the initial quotation, therefore, Willy's downfall is not only a product of his hubris, but a variety of factors. His hubris, tragic flaw, and the social environment that preys on him all work together in propelling his psychological turmoil and eventual suicide.In an Aristotelian definition of tragedy, the tragic hero's downfall is an amalgamation of their hubris, hamartia, and the tragic villain. In Shakespearean tragedy, however, the hamartia is altered to becomes less of an act and more of an inherent character flaw, which is replicated in Miller's tragedy of 'the common man': Death of a Salesman. Willy Loman's downfall is a product of both his hubris and a mistaken belief in the Capitalist American Dream, as defined under the 1940s consumerist culture: the promise of material splendour. Willy believes in an outdated view that an individual must be 'well-liked' and stresses the importance of 'personality' in succeeding financially. However, this is in contention with the doctrine of hard-work promoted in the American Dream that boomed under the development in economic liberalism. Willy's hubris leads him into a state of self-delusion, in which he is unable to accept his failures, believing himself to be 'well liked' and 'vital in New England'. His hubris prevents him from abandoning his mistaken beliefs and leads him into further financial turmoil, for he refuses Charlie's job. This hubris concurrently prevents him from acknowledging the potential offered to him in the pastoral American Dream. The flute motif established at the start symbolises this pastoral American Dream, evident in the description of how it is 'telling of grass and tress and the horizon', which all display the natural imagery aligned with the pastoral. The flute occurs throughout the play, playing even after Willy's death. Miller describes how 'only the music of the flute is left on the darkening stage', which emphasises the sense of loss, in that it outlives Willy and offers the potential that he could have lived, had he adopted the pastoral American Dream. In contrast to the initial quotation, therefore, Willy's downfall is not only a product of his hubris, but a variety of factors. His hubris, tragic flaw, and the social environment that preys on him all work together in propelling his psychological turmoil and eventual suicide.

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3 months ago

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