Dylan N. GCSE Maths tutor, GCSE Law tutor, Mentoring -Personal Statem...

Dylan N.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Law (Bachelors) - Oxford, St Catherine's College University

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About me

I am a law student at Oxford University and looking forward to working with you. I have done a vast amount of mentoring whilst at school so I am extremely friendly and approachable. Questions are the best way to learn so never be afraid to ask absolutely anything - nothing is stupid! 

It is has taken me alot of hard work and grit to get to where I am today so I know when things can be a genuine struggle where you feel like giving up. It is so easy to drop everything and give up on getting that grade A you are looking for. Hopefully I can change that. 

An insight:

I want to offer a personalised learning experience so it is entirely up to you to decide what we look at and what you wish to gain from the session. In Maths, I think it is important to know why things are the way they are rather than just learning "that's what you do." In Law, obviously there are plenty of cases but past that, there are interesting theoretical disputes to be had. 

We will practice not only until you get it right but until you cannot get it wrong (per Mr H, my ex maths teacher).

Looking to be a lawyer, I can help!

Been through UCAS and the tough Oxford interview so if you have any questions or would like someone to help you through the process, I can be that person.

Going further...

If you have any questions, send me a 'WebMail' or book a 'Meet the Tutor Session'!

I look forward to meeting you in due course.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Economics GCSE £18 /hr
Law GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathsA-LevelA*
LawA-LevelA
EconomicsA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

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Questions Dylan has answered

Show that n^2 -n - 90 = 0

This is the full question: There are n sweets in a bag. 6 sweets are orange. The rest of the sweets are yellow. Hannah takes a sweet out of the bag at random. She eats the sweet and then takes another at random. She eats the second sweet.  The probability that Hannah eats two orange sweets is...

This is the full question:

There are n sweets in a bag. 6 sweets are orange. The rest of the sweets are yellow. Hannah takes a sweet out of the bag at random. She eats the sweet and then takes another at random. She eats the second sweet.  The probability that Hannah eats two orange sweets is 1/3. Show that n2 - n - 90 = 0

This is the question that caused much upset and pain during this years GCSE exam. But hopefully with my explanation we can work out what is going on.

Always in wordy question extract your information:

- n sweets (n could be any number)

- 6 orange 

- picks 2 sweet one at a time and eats them

The fact that she eats them is important because in probability we call this non-replacement (she is not putting the sweets back in so the probability of picking an orange/yellow sweet is always changing). 

- probability of orange and orange again is 1/3

So because we are not replacing the sweets we know that to get 2 orange, she picks an orange first and then another. 

If there are 6 to start of with, the chance of me picking one is 6/n. (n is the total number of sweets)

I eat this sweet so there is one less sweet in the bag: n-1 (n was the original total, now there is one less)

Therefore the probability of me taking another orange providing I have already picked one is  5/n-1

We were told in the question the probability of picking 2 orange is 1/3.

So:

6/n x 5/n-1 = 1/3

We know that when we multiply factions - you can do so instantly - no need to change anything so you get:

30/n(n-1) = 1/3

Lets multiply both sides by 3

90/n(n-1) = 1

Now lets multiply both sides by n(n-1)

90 = n(n-1)

Expand the brackets

90 = n- n 

Subtract 90 on both sides

n2 - n - 90 = 0

You have solved the questions and shown full working.

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1 year ago

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