Emily B. GCSE Maths tutor, GCSE Biology tutor, GCSE Chemistry tutor, ...

Emily B.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Medicine (Doctorate) - Durham University

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About me

Hi! I'm Emily, a second year medical student at Durham University. I am happy to help your child with Maths GCSE and AS-Level, Biology, Chemistry and Geography GCSE and A-Level and medical school applications. I have achieved an A* in Maths, Biology and Geography A-Level and an A in Chemistry A-Level. 

I recently applied to medical school so have experience in medical school applications. I can offer good advise on how to make your personal statements stand out, and give tips for interviews. 

I had a tutor throughout A-Levels so I understand what it feels like to be the tutee. Sometimes people just need things to be explained in a differet way or maybe they just need a confidence boost. Whatever it is you or you child nedds, I will try to provide it. 

So please do get in touch with your exam board and the topics you are struggling with!

I look forward to hearing from you! 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Biology GCSE £18 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
-Medical School Preparation- Mentoring £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathsA-LevelA*
BiologyA-LevelA*
ChemistryA-LevelA
GeographyA-LevelA*
UKCATUni Admissions Test760
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

29/09/2014

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

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Questions Emily has answered

Describe adaptations of plants that live in dry conditions, such as the desert.

Plants that live in these areas need to minimise the rate at which they transpire in order to preserve as much water as possible.  One way they do this is by reducing their surface area:volume ratio, in many cases they are reduced to just spines like on a cacti. This reduces the amount of lea...

Plants that live in these areas need to minimise the rate at which they transpire in order to preserve as much water as possible. 

One way they do this is by reducing their surface area:volume ratio, in many cases they are reduced to just spines like on a cacti. This reduces the amount of leaf exposed to the sun, which therefore reduces evaporation and transpiration of water in the leaf. 

in order to get the water in the first place, these plants have two types of roots. Very deep root are required to reach the very low groundwater and shallow roots that spread far to collect the occassoinal rainfall.

In these plants there are often fewer or smaller stomata (the holes in which gas exchange can occur from the air inside and outside the leaf). Fewer stomata means less water will transpire from the leaf. Another adaptation is for the stomata to close during midday when it is hottest. although this means that the plant cannot photosynthesise, it also means the plant has water to survive, so it is a compromise. 

Other adaptations plants can make to reduce transpiration are rolled leaves, leaf hairs and stomata sunken in pits. All of these adaptations trap moist air which increases humidity. This results in a smaller diffusion gradient for the water vapour between the air and the stomata, slowing the diffusion of the water vapour away from the stomata. 

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1 year ago

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Solve the simultaneous equation: 6x+y = 27 3x-2y = 6

To work out simultaneous equations, the aim is to remove one letter from the equations, i.e. Remove the y's so you have only x's and numbers (or vice versa). One way to do this is to get the coefficient in front of either the y's or x's to equal each other. In this example, you can get th...

To work out simultaneous equations, the aim is to remove one letter from the equations, i.e. Remove the y's so you have only x's and numbers (or vice versa).

One way to do this is to get the coefficient in front of either the y's or x's to equal each other.

In this example, you can get the coefficients of the x's to equal each other if you multiply the second equation by two:

3x-2y = 6    (x2)

=   6x-4y = 12

So now..

6x+y = 27

6x-4y = 12

Since the coefficients equal each other, you can take one equation away from the other to remove the x's:

6x+y = 27

6x-4y = 12

------------

5y = 15           (y--4y = 5y, and 27-12 = 15)

Now solve y. 

y = 15/5

y= 3

Now to find what x is, you put 3 in as y to either of the original equations:

6x+y = 27

6x+3 = 27

6x = 24

x = 4

There you go! 

x=4 and y=3

to check you have the correct values, you can put the numbers back into the other equations. If the equation works you have it right.

3x-2y = 6

12-6 = 6

It works! 

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1 year ago

404 views

What is the mass (g) of 0.25mols of NaCl?

What you need for these equations are a calculator, periodic table and the following equation: Mass (g) = Mr x Moles     (important equation to remember) In this case we already know the moles as it's in the question, 0.25 moles.  to find the Mr, you need to look at your periodic table. Fin...

What you need for these equations are a calculator, periodic table and the following equation:

Mass (g) = Mr x Moles     (important equation to remember)

In this case we already know the moles as it's in the question, 0.25 moles. 

to find the Mr, you need to look at your periodic table. Find the relative atomic mass of Na and Cl and add the two numbers together. 

Na = 22.99

Cl = 35.45

NaCl = 58.4

Now just put all of the numbers into the equation. 

0.25 x 58.4 = 14.6g

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1 year ago

415 views
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