Contact Stephen
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About me

About Me:

I am a second year mature student at the University of Bristol, studying Classics. I harbour a true love for the Classics, as well as for English and French literature, and I find great pleasure in sharing this enthusiasm for learning with others. In my time I have had the great privilege of being taught by some truly outstanding teachers, besides some less outstanding ones, and I have strived to develop my teaching methods by learning from these experiences, as I have chosen teaching for my intended career.

I have a considerable amount of experience of teaching already behind me.

I am patient and empathetic, and I have been told by past pupils that I possess in abundance the ability to ‘tailor’ my teaching to the needs of the student.

The Sessions:

During the sessions, you will guide what we cover. With languages, it is essential to have a solid foundational knowledge of the way in which that language works, before going on to tackle the literature side of things. However, despite what some people think, building this foundational base need not be a chore, but may be turned into a fun exercise that the students enjoy.

I will use a range of teaching methods to ensure that the concept is understood not just from one but from varying angles, and until the student has the confidence in his/her understanding of it to be able to explain it through to me.

I aim to make the sessions as enjoyable as possible, and will aim to finish each session on a high note. It is an excellent thing to end something like this just when the student is really enjoying it, as he/she will be looking forward all the more to the next session, so that an enthusiasm for the subject may be cultivated in this way. 

What next?

If you have any questions, send me a 'WebMail' or book a 'Meet the Tutor Session'!

I look forward to meeting you! :)

Stephen

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Classical Civilisation A Level £20 /hr
Classical Greek A Level £20 /hr
Latin A Level £20 /hr
Classical Civilisation GCSE £18 /hr
Classical Greek GCSE £18 /hr
English Language GCSE £18 /hr
French GCSE £18 /hr
Latin GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
LatinA-LevelA
GreekA-LevelA
FrenchBaccalaureate6
EnglishBaccalaureate6
SpanishBaccalaureate6
MathsBaccalaureate6
HistoryBaccalaureate6
BiologyBaccalaureate5
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

21/09/2015

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Ratings and reviews

4.8from 19 customer reviews

Saira (Parent) August 18 2016

My son really enjoyed his first lesson of Latin with Stephen.

Saira (Parent) December 3 2016

Saira (Parent) November 27 2016

Saira (Parent) November 19 2016

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Questions Stephen has answered

How does the ablative case work?

The easiest way to explain it is that it is the 'adverbial' case. This means that it will always tell us something more about how an action (described by the verb) took place. One of the simplest examples to demonstrate this is the following sentence: puer militem gladio necavit If the sente...

The easiest way to explain it is that it is the 'adverbial' case. This means that it will always tell us something more about how an action (described by the verb) took place.

One of the simplest examples to demonstrate this is the following sentence:

puer militem gladio necavit

If the sentence had lacked the ablative 'gladio' then we would not have known how the boy killed the soldier; as it is, we are told that the boy killed the soldier 'with a sword'.

The ablative thus provides more information about the action taking place, information that is often interesting and extremely useful in understanding the text.

If you get stuck about how a noun in the ablative case fits into the sentence, just remember that it will always be answering one of the four following questions about how the action took place: 'how', 'when', 'where' or 'why'.

When you ask yourself which of these four the ablative is answering, it will soon be obvious which one and will be then much clearer how you should translate it.

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1 year ago

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