Hayden M. A Level Further Mathematics  tutor, GCSE Maths tutor, A Lev...

Hayden M.

Unavailable

Physics (Masters) - Warwick University

5.0
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22 reviews

This tutor is also part of our Schools Programme. They are trusted by teachers to deliver high-quality 1:1 tuition that complements the school curriculum.

24 completed lessons

About me

Hi, my name is Hayden.

I am finishing off my Masters in Physics at The University of Warwick and having a great time. What I will hopefully be able to convey to tutees is the satisfaction when you can solve a problem just with some scribbles and applied thinking.

If you find your study boring or dull I will go out of my way to show you how whatever you're learning is used to do something cool. We can set up tightropes with trigonometry or design rollercoasters with differentiation, promise.

Still not convinced? Book a free 'meet the tutor' session with me to get a feel for my personality and teaching style. I look forward to meeting with you, thanks!

Hi, my name is Hayden.

I am finishing off my Masters in Physics at The University of Warwick and having a great time. What I will hopefully be able to convey to tutees is the satisfaction when you can solve a problem just with some scribbles and applied thinking.

If you find your study boring or dull I will go out of my way to show you how whatever you're learning is used to do something cool. We can set up tightropes with trigonometry or design rollercoasters with differentiation, promise.

Still not convinced? Book a free 'meet the tutor' session with me to get a feel for my personality and teaching style. I look forward to meeting with you, thanks!

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About my sessions

I'm a pretty relaxed and patient person who is a big believer in practice makes perfect, especially with maths. If you tend to get frustrated at yourself for not understanding things: you are not alone and we can just work at it until the penny drops. This means a lot of practicing of questions.

My tutoring style utilises a lot of analogies because science can be very confusing with unncecessary long words and terms so I find it important to show that the underlying concepts of science are straightforward and I can prove it to you. It's nto necessary to just memorise for an exam, it helps so much to understand why something works, and that's how I hope to teach.

As for what you want to be taught: that's up to you. Exam questions, lesson-like explanations of theory, helping you work through some homework - you decide and I'll do my best to help.

We can work to a schedule towards a goal and I find that it works best when we integrate the tutorials with school lessons and use mock papers to assess progress.

I'm a pretty relaxed and patient person who is a big believer in practice makes perfect, especially with maths. If you tend to get frustrated at yourself for not understanding things: you are not alone and we can just work at it until the penny drops. This means a lot of practicing of questions.

My tutoring style utilises a lot of analogies because science can be very confusing with unncecessary long words and terms so I find it important to show that the underlying concepts of science are straightforward and I can prove it to you. It's nto necessary to just memorise for an exam, it helps so much to understand why something works, and that's how I hope to teach.

As for what you want to be taught: that's up to you. Exam questions, lesson-like explanations of theory, helping you work through some homework - you decide and I'll do my best to help.

We can work to a schedule towards a goal and I find that it works best when we integrate the tutorials with school lessons and use mock papers to assess progress.

Show more

Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Ratings & Reviews

5from 22 customer reviews
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Ryuko (Parent from Cambridge)

October 1 2016

Very good first session. It was clear and easy to follow. Thank you.

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Adnan (Parent from balgeddie)

March 1 2018

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Ryuko (Parent from Cambridge)

March 15 2017

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Ryuko (Parent from Cambridge)

March 8 2017

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
MathematicsA-level (A2)A*
PhysicsA-level (A2)A*
ChemistryA-level (A2)A
Further MathematicsA-level (A2)A

General Availability

Pre 12pm12-5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
Further MathematicsA Level£36 /hr
MathsA Level£36 /hr
PhysicsA Level£36 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£36 /hr
EnglishGCSE£36 /hr
MathsGCSE£36 /hr
PhysicsGCSE£36 /hr
ScienceGCSE£36 /hr

Questions Hayden has answered

How do I simplify a surd?

To simplify a surd, remember that

sqrt(a*b) = sqrt(a)*sqrt(b)

If either a or b are square numbers, you can simply write its square root. Hence, to simplify a surd, you must look for any factors of the number inside the square root that are sqaure numbers.

For example, 

sqrt(20) = sqrt(4*5) = sqrt(4)*sqrt(5)

sqrt(4) = 2 therefore sqrt(20) = 2sqrt(5)

To simplify a surd, remember that

sqrt(a*b) = sqrt(a)*sqrt(b)

If either a or b are square numbers, you can simply write its square root. Hence, to simplify a surd, you must look for any factors of the number inside the square root that are sqaure numbers.

For example, 

sqrt(20) = sqrt(4*5) = sqrt(4)*sqrt(5)

sqrt(4) = 2 therefore sqrt(20) = 2sqrt(5)

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3 years ago

1506 views

How do I solve a simultaneous equation with more unknowns than equations?

If a set of equations has more unknowns than equations, you cannot get a value for each unknown. However, you can find the relationships between the variables.

Start by rearranging one variable in terms of the others and then plug that equation into the others, eliminating one variable. You will then be able to link the rest of the variables together in terms of each other.

Finally, set one variable as a parameter, say u, and give the values of all the variable in terms of that uniting parameter.

For example, you will end up with something like:

x = 2u - 1

y = 1/2u + 4

z = u

If a set of equations has more unknowns than equations, you cannot get a value for each unknown. However, you can find the relationships between the variables.

Start by rearranging one variable in terms of the others and then plug that equation into the others, eliminating one variable. You will then be able to link the rest of the variables together in terms of each other.

Finally, set one variable as a parameter, say u, and give the values of all the variable in terms of that uniting parameter.

For example, you will end up with something like:

x = 2u - 1

y = 1/2u + 4

z = u

Show more

3 years ago

973 views

What if my equation doesn't factorise?

For all quadratic equations, you can use the quadratic formula. Given an equation of the form ax2+bx+c, you can plug those values into this formula:

x1, x= (-b +/- sqrt(b- 4ac)) / 2a

Note: the term b- 4ac is called the determinant  and must be greater than 0 for your equation to have any solutions.

For all quadratic equations, you can use the quadratic formula. Given an equation of the form ax2+bx+c, you can plug those values into this formula:

x1, x= (-b +/- sqrt(b- 4ac)) / 2a

Note: the term b- 4ac is called the determinant  and must be greater than 0 for your equation to have any solutions.

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3 years ago

912 views

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